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LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




Maryland Room 
Uahrertlty of Maryland Llbftcr 

Collece Park. MM 



I 



Digitized 


by the Internet Archive 








in 2013 





http://archive.org/details/report00mary_76 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1948 




Baltimore, Maryland 



STATE OF MARYLAND 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE, 1948 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres .Cumberland MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

NICHOLAS OREM, Vice-Pres Hyattsville OSCAR B. COBLENTZ Catonsville 

WENDELL D. ALLEN Baltimore MRS. CURTIS WALKER Chevy Chase 

HORACE M. MORGAN Queen Anne 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 



OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1111 Lexington Building, Baltimore- 1 



State Superintendent of Schools 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. 
Ass't State Sup't for Vocational Education 

JOHN J. SEIDEL 
Directors 

MERLE S. BATEMAN, Certification, Ac- 
creditation, Publications 

JAMES E. SPITZNAS, Instruction 

BESSIE C. STERN, Finance, Statistics, Ed- 
ucational Measurements 
Supervisors 

GRACE L. ALDER, Elementary Schools 

ELIZABETH AMERY, Home Economics 

BRIAN M. BENSON, Finance 

MRS. GERTRUDE N. BOWIE, School Lunch 
Program 

*GLEN D. BROWN, Industrial Education for 
Adults 

R. FLOYD CROMWELL, Guidance 
WILBUR DEVILBISS, High Schools 
THOMAS C. FERGUSON, Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation 
E. CLARKE FONTAINE, High Schools 
R. CHRISTINE HOGAN, Statistics 
MRS. GLADYS T. HOPKINS, Curriculum 
PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools 
HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Education 
HARRY M. McDONALD, Agriculture 
RICHARD K. McKAY, On-the-job Training 
WILLIAM O'DELL, Surplus Property 
JAMES L. REID, School Lunch, Surplus 
Property 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN, Spec. Ed., At- 
tend., Transport., On-the-job Training 
Assistant Supervisors 

CHARLES V. AKELEY, Finance, Statistics 
CHARLES C. CONLON, Jr., Accreditation 
GEORGE M. CRAWFORD, Curriculum 
E. B. DEXTER, Surplus Property 
AUSTIN E. GISRIEL, On-the-job Training 
M. ELEANOR RICE, Certification 
ETHEL E. SAMMIS, Physical Education, 
Recreation 

DOROTHY SHIRES, Elementary Schools 
MRS. M. MARIE WHEATLEY, Curriculum 
Consultant Architect 
*F. J. THUMAN 



Administrative Assistant I 

RUTH E. HOBBS 
Clerk- Receptionist 

E. SUE WALTER 
Telephone Operator I 

MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 
Statisticians 

WILLIAM C. FEADER, I 

HELEN D. GEORGE, I 

MARION FREYER, II 

MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS 
Principal Account Clerks 

MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 

MINNIE GERBER, II 

BLANCHE E. KEEN, II 
Stenographer-Secretaries 

MARGARET E. ALBAUGH 

E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS 

ELSIE F. FORMAN 

CARRYE HAMBURGER 

ELIZABETH McGINNITY 
Senior Stenographers 

BEVERLY L. BENNETT 

DENA BORES 

MARGARET G. BROOKS 

HELEN P. ELLIS 

MRS. HELEN C. KATENKAMP 

MRS. ANNA E. KILNER 

MARTHA LEE MARSH 

MRS. JEANNE S. MORGAN 

CAROLYN A. RYE 

MARTHA SAPPINGTON 

MRS. BETTY JEAN WAGGONER 

ZITA WALDERMAN 
Stenographer-Accounting 

MRS. LAURA M. GAITHER 
Senior Clerks 

CATHERINE D. GIBSON 

MRS. CATHERINE L. OWINGS 
Senior Typists 

MRS. OLIVIA GOODRICH 

MARGARET H. MILLER 
Junior Clerks 

FLORENCE N. BRADY 

VIOLET C. CAMPBELL 

CHARLOTTE S. WAXMAN 



11 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

1112 Lexington Building, Baltimore- 1 

Counselor 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 

LIONEL BURGESS, Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Service for the Blind 
W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Guidance, Place- 
ment, Training 



* Part time 



MYRTLE E. CHELL, Tuberculosis Cases 
Medical Consultant 
♦DEAN W. ROBERTS, M.D. 

2612 N. Charles St., Baltimore-18 
Stenographer-Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 
Senior Stenographers 
ANNE NUSINOV 
CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 



2 



Branch Offices, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 



Baltimore Branch 

500 Liberty Building, Baltimore-1 
District Supervisor 

THOMAS D. BRAUN 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

CHARLES P. FONDA 

CHARLES L. HILL 

FOY L. LUNSFORD 

IRWIN D. MEDINGER 

JEWELL M. PRESNELL 

RUTH F. RING 

H. SMITH SHUMWAY 
Stenographer-Secretary 

EMMA E. LUECKERT 
Senior Stenographers 

MILDRED R. ECK 

MRS. CHRISTINE HATCH 

BELL M. SKLAR 
Senior Clerk 

MRS. MARGARET A. SCHROFF 

Central Maryland Branch 

1116 Lexington Building, Baltimore-1 
District Supervisor 

R. KENNETH BARNES 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

B. W. BARKER 
Senior Stenographer 

ROBERTA M. SPOONER 



t At 108 Washington Street, Cumberland 



Western Maryland Branch 

170 W. Washington Street, Hagerstown 
District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

tJ. LEO DELANEY 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 

109 Calvert Building, Salisbury 
District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 
Rehabilitation Counselors 

ROBERT L. BURTON 

GEORGE W. ENGLE 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. PAULINE P. DAWSON 

Southern Maryland Branch 

4700 Baltimore Blvd., Hyattsville 
District Supervisor 

MERL D. MYERS 
Rehabilitation Counselor 

HENRY D. DEVLIN 
Senior Stenographer 

MRS. LILLIAN MAY BELT 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-1 



Director 

HELEN M. CLARK 
Supervisor 

MAE GRAHAM, School and Children's 
Libraries 
Counselors 

CATHERINE M. BARNHART, Technical 

Counselor 
IVEN CASE, Readers' Counselor 



Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON 

JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN, Assistant 

MRS. SUZANNE V. PEARCE, Senior Asst. 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER, Junior 
Assistant 
Stenographer-Secretary 

RUTH TIMANUS 
Senior Stenographer 

EVELYN M. SCHABB 
Junior Typist 

CATHERINE A. HOLLAND 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg WILLIAM E. HENRY Bowie 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 



HOOPER S. MILES, State Treasurer, Chairman 
EDWIN W. BROOME, Sup't Schools 

Montgomery County, Vice-Chairman 
JAMES J. LACY, State Comptroller 
THOMAS J. PULLEN, Jr., 

State Superintendent of Schools 
ALTHEA FULLER, Principal, Allegany County 



J. P. MANNION, Director 
THOMAS I. HAYS, Executive Secretary 
MINNIE HAMILTON, Stenographer-Secretary 
HELEN M. KIRKMAN, Principal Clerk 
MRS. MAMIE RUSSELL TODD, Senior Clerk 
BERNADETTE DUFFY, Senior Typist 



/ 6 Q f<t& 



3 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS AND 
SUPERVISORS- June 1948 



County Address 
ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Superintendent 

CHARLES L. KOPP 
Assistant Superintendent 
♦RICHARD T. RIZER 
Directors 

RUBY M. ADAMS, Elementary Education 
RALPH E. KESSLER, Special Education 
WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 
Supervisors 
♦RICHARD T. RIZER, High 
JANE E. BOTSFORD, Elementary 
MILDRED WILLISON, Elementary 
WINIFRED GREENE, Primary 
JULIUS D. LONNHOLM, Vocational and 

Adult Education 
JACK E. PLATT, Music 
EVELYN MILLER, Home Economics 
MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, 

JOSEPH T. DOWNEY, Buildings & Grounds 
ARTHUR G. RAMEY, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 

Director 

♦R. HAROLD McCANN, Transportation 
Supervisors 
♦HOWARD A. KINHART, High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR, Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY, Elementary 
MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elementary 
LEVIAH DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES, Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational and 

Veterans Training 
LEE W. ADKINS, Agriculture and Cafeterias 
*R. HAROLD McCANN, Maintenance 
MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING, Pupil 
Personnel 

BALTIMORE— Towson 
Superintendent 

RAYMOND S. HYSON 
Associate Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON 
Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH, Elementary Educat'n 

M. LUCETTA SISK, Curriculum and In- 
struction 
Supervisors 

JAMES B. O'TOOLE, Jr., Junior High 

C. JAMES VELIE, Music 

OLIVE JOBES, Art 

HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 

MARY E. KELLEHER, Home Economics 

ANNA MEEKS, Guidance 

T. M. GREENE, Business Subjects and Adult 
Education 

JENNIE E. JESSOP, Elementary 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT, Elementary 
ANNA G. SHEPPARD, Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST, Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and Junior High 
ARTHUR A. DICK, Transportation and 

Maintenance 
HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personnel 

CALVERT— Prince Frederick 
Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 
Supervisors 

CLARENCE W. MASON, Elementary and 
High 

JAMES P. LAYNE, Colored Elementary and 
High 

C. ELIZABETH REIG, Pupil Personnel 



County Address 
CAROLINE— Denton 
Superintendent 

W. STEWART FITZGERALD 
Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON, Jr., High 
A. MAY THOMPSON, Elementary 
♦MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. ELIZABETH A. STONE, Pupil 
Personnel 

CARROLL— Westminster 
Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS 
Supervisors 

JOHN F. WOODEN, Jr., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
♦PHILIP S. ROYER, Music 
♦MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST, Home Economics 

and Cafeterias 
♦MAE E. PRINCE, Colored Elementary and 
High 

MAYE E. GRIMES, Pupil Personnel 



CECIL— Elkton 
Superintendent 

H. E. McBRIDE 
Supervisors 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER, High 

OLIVE L. REYNOLDS, Elementary 

PAUL S. HYDE, Elementary 
♦RACHEL E. BOYD, Home Economics 

EDWIN II. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— LaPlata 
Superintendent 

F. B. GWYNN 
Supervisors 

B. LUCILE BOWIE, Elementary 
♦MILTON M. SOMERS, High 
JOSEPH C. PARKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. CECELIA E. FARRALL, Pupil 
Personnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 

Superintendent 

W. THEODORE BOSTON 

Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER, High 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON, Elementary 
MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored El- 

mentary and High 
JOHN T. COMER, Jr., Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 
Supervisors 

DUVAL W. SWEADNER, High 

MRS. CHARLOTTE E. BURRIER, Ele- 
mentary and Junior High 

MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elementary 

A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Ele- 
mentary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Education 
and Health 
♦CHARLES C. T. STULL, Music 
♦MRS. DOROTHY S. RANCK, Home Eco- 
nomics 

♦CHARLES E. HENSON, Colored Elementary 
and High 

GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT— Oakland 
Superintendent 

FRANKLIN E. RATHBUN 
Assistant Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 



* Part time in this position 



County Address 
Supervisors 

KATE BANNATYNE, Elementary 
MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 
JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD— Bel Air 

Superintendent 

CHARLES W. WILLIS 

Assistant Superintendent 

BENJAMIN S. CARROLL 

Supervisors 

DOROTHY A. MUDD, Junior High 
HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU, Elementary 
ALLEN B. AMOSS, Cafeterias and Adult 
Education 

♦PERCY V. WILLIAMS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

♦ESTELLA EVERETT, Pupil Personnel 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 
Superintendent 

HERBERT C. BROWN 
Supervisors 
♦ELEANOR M. DRIES, High 

GAIL CHADWICK, Elementary 
♦RUTH S. MacVEAN, Home Economics 
♦MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Elementary 
and High 

HARRY T. MURPHY, Pupil Personnel 

KENT— Chestertown 
Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 
Supervisors 

G. WATSON ALGIRE, High 
LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 
*MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. MAY M. BECK, Pupil Personnel 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 
Assistant Superintendents 

RICHARD E. CARPENTER, School Prop- 
erty 

EDGAR M. DOUGLASS, Administration 
Director 

WILLIAM B. MARKS, Transportation 
Supervisors 

MRS. FERN D. SCHNEIDER, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH S. GLASS, Elementary 
LILLIAN L. GORE, Elementary 
LUCILLE E. JOHNSON, Music 
MARJORIE J. BILLOWS, Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Education 
WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Special Educa- 
tion 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Arts and 

C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum Develop- 
ment 

MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
EDWARD U. TAYLOR, Colored Elementary 
and High 

T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
Superintendent 

G. GARDNER SHUGART 
Assistant Secretary 

PAUL D. COOPER 
Director 

WILLIAM B. SCHMIDT, Instruction 
Supervisors 

ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Junior High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
MILDRED HOYLE, Elementary 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED, Elementary 
MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
MRS. LEO J. QUINN, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 
Education 



County Address 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial and Adult 
Education 

*M. GLADYS DICKERSON, Home Econo- 
mics 

ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, Cafeterias 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

WILLIAM H. HALL, Assistant in Colored 
Schools 

JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
KATHLEEN SHEARS, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 

Superintendent 

FRANKLIN D. DAY 

Supervisors 

GEORGE T. PRATT, High 
MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elementary 
MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Ele- 
mentary and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S— Leonardtown 
Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 
Supervisors 

E. VIOLETTE YOUNG, Elementary 
♦MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home 
Economics 

RALPH S. WATERS, Colored Elementary 
and High 

HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
Superintendent 

C. ALLEN CARLSON 
Supervisors 

CLINTON W. CORBIN, High and Pupil 
Personnel 

ALICE MAE COULBOURN, Elementary 
♦KERMIT COTTMAN, Colored Elementary 
and High 

TALBOT— Easton 
Superintendent 

J. WILLARD DAVIS 
Supervisors 

ARTHUR R. HIGGINBOTTOM, High 
M. LILLIAN CHEEZUM, Elementary 
♦W. H. FAUNTLEROY, Colored Elementary 
and High 

MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW, Pupil 
Personnel 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 

Assistant Superintendent 
WILLIAM C. DIEHL 

Supervisors 

PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY, Elementary 
ANNE H. RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Jr., Industrial Arts 
ELEANOR HARTNETT, School Lunch 
WILBUR M. PHILLIPS, Pupil Personnel 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 
Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 
Supervisors 

LESTER A. HALL, High 

MRS. LEAH M. PHILLIPS, Elementary 

MARIE A. DASHIELL, Colored Elementary 
and High 

CHARLES E. TILGHMAN, Pupil Personnel 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 
Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS 
Supervisors 

MRS. MARGARET LAWS ENGLE, 
Elementarv 

♦MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Personnel 



Part time in this position 



5 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of transmittal 7 

State Superintendent's Review of 1947-1948 8 

1947-1948 Special Sessions Legislation Affecting Education 13 

Excerpts from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 15 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Instruction 19 

Certification and Accreditation 25 

Library Extension 30 

Vocational Education 32 

Vocational Rehabilitation 36 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools.. 38 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 39 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools, Births 40 

Per Cent and Index of Attendance 45 

Grade Enrollment; Non-promotions in Elementary Schools 48 

Age Grade Distribution, Over Ageness 54 

Education for Handicapped Children 57 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupation, Colleges Attended 60 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 67 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 84 

Teachers by Subject, Certification, Sex, Summer School Attendance, 

Resignations, Turnover 90 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 105 

Clerks in Schools; Janitors, Utility Men, etc 106 

Number Pupils Belonging; Average Salary per Teacher 108 

Number and Size of Schools Ill 

Baltimore City Adult Education and Summer Schools 116 

Schools and Institutions for Atypical Children 119 

Vocational Rehabilitation 120 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 122 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 126 

Cost per Pupil 128 

Salaries 134 

Vocational Program, Adult Education 136 

Transportation 141 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 145 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 149 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 156 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 157 

Sources Other than Public Funds; Parent-Teacher Associations 159 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland 161 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Bowie, Frostburg, Salisbury, Towson.. 162 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers Retirement System 169 

Library Extension; Aid to School Libraries 170 

The State and County Health Program for School Children 173 

List of Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 177 

Index 223 

6 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1949 



HONORABLE WILLIAM PRESTON LANE, Jr. 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor Lane: 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77 of the Laws of Maryland, the 
eighty-second "annual report, covering all operations of the State Department 
of Education and the support, condition, progress, and needs of education through- 
out the State" for the school year ending in June 1948, is herewith presented to 
you. 

In the preparation of this report we have endeavored to limit the descriptive 
material to statements setting forth the philosophy of education prevalent in 
the State during the period under review and an analysis of the activities of each 
division of the Department. 

During the year we saw the first effects of the epoch making legislation of 
1947. The new salary schedule for teachers, principals, supervisors, and superin- 
tendents is reflected in the sharp increase in annual salaries during the year. 
According to the biennial report of the United States Office of Education for 
1947-48 the average salary for the instructional staff in Maryland was $3,321 
and the average salary for the country was $2,639, with Maryland ranking fourth. 
The amount of State aid for public elementary and secondary schools for local 
political subdivisions was $20,186,931. This represents an increase over 1946-47 
of $10,393,326 or 106 per cent. 

While the supply of teachers is not yet adequate to meet the demand at the 
elementary level, the various counties and the City of Baltimore have been able 
to staff their high schools with qualified personnel. The shortage of qualified 
teachers at the elementary level will probably continue until the peak enrollment, 
due to the sharp increase in the birth rate, is reached in 1957-58. 

Much progress has been made in school building construction to provide 
for this increased enrollment. Additional financial assistance from the State will 
probably be necessary in order to provide the necessary extra classrooms. 

The continued interest and support of the citizens of Maryland are responsible 
in large measure for the progress which has been made in public education. 



Respectfully submitted, 



THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr. 

Secretary-Treasurer 



State Board of Education 



Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Nicholas Orem, Vice-President, 
Wendell D. Allen 
Oscar B. Coblentz 



Horace M. Morgan 
Mrs. Alvin Thalheimer 
Mrs. Curtis Walker 



7 



8 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION REVIEWS 
SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF 1947-48 

Public education today is a far cry from the early days when 
it was considered that only the elements of literacy were necessary. 
Life today is far more complex and the need therefore for extended 
educational opportunities far greater than ever before. The purpose 
of public education in a democracy is to develop free-thinking, in- 
telligent, and self-reliant citizens, and this can only result when the 
extent of education offered is commensurate with the complexities 
of the decisions that citizens under a free government have to make. 

Jefferson, a strong advocate of universal education, realized 
that education would have to keep pace with the changes in a free 
society, and in the following words he warned against the loss of 
faith in the power of education to develop citizens who can make 
intelligent decisions: 

"I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers 
of society but the people themselves; and if we think them 
not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a 
wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from 
them, but to inform their discretion by education. No 
government can continue good but under the control of 
the people." 

As time goes on and conditions change, the State must con- 
stantly be rethinking its educational program and be making ad- 
justments and extensions. The public educational system is the 
life blood of a democracy. It should be concerned not only with 
the extent of educational opportunity but with its quality. Ad- 
ministrators must regularly examine what they are doing to be sure 
that all children are receiving the best opportunities possible; 
personal and professional consciences demand that they be satisfied 
constantly in respect to both duties and opportunities. 

Teachers' Salaries 

John Dewey, on the occasion of his eighty-eighth birthday, re- 
marked that, "attracting the best minds to teaching is a major prob- 
lem in education," and further that, "it is imperative that teaching 
be made so attractive that the best minds will want to be teachers." 
No thinking person will disagree with these statements of Dr. 
Dewey. Maryland has always emphasized the teacher above every 
other factor in its educational program. 

A very real problem faced the State in respect to the teaching 
situation. For several years during the war period thousands of 
teachers left the profession. Every year there was a turnover of 
over thirty per cent. Thousands of Maryland children never had the 
advantage of a qualified teacher during their elementary school 
career, and the same was true in respect to many high school pupils. 
With the advent of the postwar period and its inflationary prices, 
the situation worsened rather than improved. Obviously only a 
realistic approach to the problem would be an effective one. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



9 



The State administration and the General Assembly met the 
problem without temporizing. A new minimum State salary schedule 
was recommended by the school authorities and passed unanimously 
by the General Assembly during its 1947 meeting. The salary scale 
calls for a beginning salary of $2,200 for a teacher with a bachelor's 
degree and an ultimate maximum of $3,800, with immediate credit 
for twelve years of successful experience. According to the laws of 
the State, any county or Baltimore City may supplement the salary 
required by the State. As of September 1, 1948, Baltimore, Mont- 
gomery, Prince George's, Allegany, Anne Arundel, Washington, 
Harford, Kent, and Calvert Counties and Baltimore City had all 
supplemented these salaries to a minimum of $2,400 or $2,500 and a 
maximum of $4,000 to $4,500, with additional salaries for teachers 
holding the master's degree. 

What have been the results of this important step? In the 
counties only, approximately 1,100 new teachers were employed. 
Of this number over 900 were fully qualified and the remainder 
were very near qualification. For the first time in years a number 
of teachers were secured for some of the highly specialized fields, such 
as physical education, agriculture, industrial arts, music, and art. 

Maryland is not "out of the woods" yet, but is coming out 
much more quickly than had been anticipated. The State administra- 
tion is not only interested in compensating properly the teachers on 
the jobs and in securing presently qualified teachers, but is also 
interested in making teaching so attractive that the best minds 
among the young people will prepare for teaching. In brief, Mary- 
land is building for the future. 

During the war the State teacher training institutions sank to 
new low levels in enrollment. Although four or five times the num- 
ber of graduates annually were needed, the enrollment in the four 
teachers' colleges dropped to less than half of what it was in normal 
times. The new salary schedule for teachers has reversed this trend. 
The freshmen enrollment figures were greater in 1947-48 than they 
were during the previous ten years. In one college, Towson, the en- 
rollment was the largest since 1932. If the trend continues, and 
there is every reason to believe that it will, Maryland should have a 
full quota of prospective teachers in its institutions within the next 
few years. It will, however, be several years before the full benefit 
of this increased enrollment will be reflected in the schools. 

The need for teachers over a period of years has been projected, 
with due regard to the expansion in the public school system as al- 
ready provided by law, and it is known that there will have to be an 
enrollment of approximately 2,500 in the three colleges for whites 
and between 400 and 500 in the college for the colored to meet the 
demand. This refers only to the need for elementary teachers. 
Obviously there will be many and good jobs for bright and ambitious 
minds. 



10 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



High School Supervision 

For thirty or more years Maryland has been noted for its system 
of State and local supervision of elementary schools. Every county 
has had at least one well-trained supervisor in charge of the ele- 
mentary schools and in the State Department of Education there 
has been one or more nationally known experts in this field. This 
cooperative system of supervision has made possible the most efficient 
system of its kind in the entire country. 

When supervision in the elementary schools was accepted as 
State-wide policy and State aid was given to the counties and Balti- 
more City for this purpose, high school supervision was provided 
also but only in the office of the State Department of Education. 
There was a good reason for this arrangement. There was only a 
relatively small number of pupils in the high schools of the State 
and it was not necessary to provide this service on the local level. 
During this period, however, enrollment in the public high schools 
of the State has multiplied more than ten times. Several counties 
now have more high school pupils than some counties have ele- 
mentary pupils. During the past few years some of the larger coun- 
ties have employed high school supervisors at their own expense as 
it has been impossible for the small number of State supervisors to 
render the services needed. 

If supervision is a sound practice in the elementary school, it 
is equally so in the high school field. Furthermore, every school sys- 
tem in the State should enjoy the privileges of sound educational 
practice. Legislation was therefore proposed in 1947 to provide State 
aid for high school supervision in every county and Baltimore City. 
During the year 1947-48 high school supervision was made available 
at the local level in all except three counties. This represented a 
decided step forward. 

Adult Education 

Intelligent people are beginning to realize the importance of 
providing educational opportunities for adults who are concerned 
with problems — national, state, local, and international. It is neces- 
sary that they be given an opportunity to study these problems 
under satisfactory conditions. They are interested in improving 
themselves vocationally in order to be better equipped to make a 
living; they should be given this opportunity. One has but to study 
the enrollment figures in the more progressive communities of the 
country to see how eagerly adults are taking advantage of the chance 
to continue their studies. The people of Maryland wish the same 
privilege also as our limited past experience will testify. In 1940 
the first appropriation in the amount of $10,000 was made for this 
service to supplement the funds spent by the counties for this pur- 
pose. This amount was increased to $20,000 in 1946, and was raised 
to $50,000 during the past year. 

During the war period this part of the program su^ered rather 
severely due to the lack of vocational teachers. However, the regular 
teachers were giving training to a large number of people in prepara- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



tion for work in war industries. In 1947-48 there was a fairly well- 
organized program of adult education in practically every county 
and Baltimore City. Furthermore, eight counties considered this 
program so important that they appointed supervisors who devoted 
their full time to this work and at county expense. Baltimore City 
has had a splendid program for a number of years. 



Improvement in the School Plant 

Possibly one of the greatest weaknesses of the Maryland school 
system in the past has been its lack of educationally adequate school 
buildings. There was a valid reason for this situation. Maryland, for 
twenty-five years or more, has spent the greater part of its school 
funds in securing well-qualified teachers. The soundness of this 
policy cannot be questioned. Another factor responsible for this 
condition is that the entire cost of constructing school buildings has 
had to be borne by the counties and the City of Baltimore locally. 
The third, though temporary, factor has been the inability to con- 
struct school buildings during the war period which in effect extended 
over a period of seven or eight years. As a result, there is quite a 
backlog of building needed. 

During 1947-48, State aid was given to the local subdivisions 
toward the construction of their school buildings. The State un- 
hesitatingly aids every county and Baltimore City in the current 
cost of operating its schools. It is equally as sound to aid in the cost 
of constructing buildings, which are a necessary and integral part 
of the school's operation. The counties vary greatly in their ability 
to provide school buildings, the richest county having nearly four 
times the wealth for each child in school as the poorest county. 
Obviously State aid is needed to give equality of education to all 
Maryland youth. 

The plan of State aid gives help to every county and Baltimore 
City on an equalizing basis. This represents a pioneering effort at 
the State level, Maryland being one of the few states to provide 
permanent State aid on an annual basis for school building con- 
struction. 

The school should be a place of community life. It should be 
designed with this purpose in mind. The local people should have a 
part in its planning. By this is not meant that the legal responsibility 
for the proper construction should be taken away from the local 
Board of Education; that is where it belongs. However, lay participa- 
tion in the planning of school buildings should be encouraged. The 
school belongs to the people; they should have an opportunity to 
make it the kind of building that will serve their community the best. 
If this procedure is followed, Maryland shall have more and better 
buildings for the simple reason that the community working co- 
operatively will see to it that its children have equal and adequate 
facilities and that the buildings will really serve the community. 
This is the democractic way of doing things. 



12 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



Greater State Aid for Counties and City of Baltimore 

For some months preceding the meeting of the General 
Assembly of 1947 the Sherbow Commission made an intensive study 
of the distribution of State funds to the local communities. This 
study and the subsequent report were quite comprehensive and 
dealt with all forms of revenue distributed by the State to the coun- 
ties and the City of Baltimore. Briefly, the report recommended that 
all State funds for education be distributed to every unit on the same 
formula. In the past, the City of Baltimore had not received its 
proportionate share of funds for public education, but this had been 
balanced largely by an increased appropriation for its welfare pro- 
gram. 

The Sherbow Commission, which worked very closely with the 
State school authorities in making its proposals, recommended further 
that the method of distribution be simplified and that the percentage 
of State aid to education be increased. These recommendations were 
carried out in full, so that under the present law every unit is 
treated exactly alike as far as the formula for distribution is con- 
cerned. State school funds are now distributed in the following 
forms of State aid: basic aid of $20 per pupil, basic aid of $400 per 
teacher, part-payment of salaries of administrative and supervisory 
personnel, and equalization aid. This is in contrast to the seven 
different forms of State aid prior to the 1947 legislation. The State 
is now bearing 40 per cent of the over-all cost of public education 
against 28.5 per cent last year. In round figures, the increase in 
the State appropriation to public education is $11,700,000, or 118 
per cent, and in addition legislation was passed that will increase 
this amount in subsequent years. 

The increase to the counties and Baltimore City for education, 
when translated into tax rates, ranges from 17 cents in Baltimore City 
and Baltimore County to $2.27 in Calvert County. In other words, 
the counties and Baltimore City would have had to increase their 
tax rates from 17 cents to $2.27 annually if the State had not as- 
sumed the burden of providing higher salaries and newer educational 
facilities. This is a point that every resident of the State should 
think about when he considers the extent to which his county is 
sharing in the cost of education. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED IN THE 1947 and 1948 
SPECIAL SESSIONS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

(The dates of the special sessions were November 1947 and May 1948.) 

Allegany — Retirement of teachers 

Chapt. 39, S. B. 47, Special Session 1947, provides that Allegany County 
shall levy sufficient funds to supplement the annual retirement allowance of 
certain former public school teachers in Allegany County. Such supplement 
shall not be greater than the amount required to raise the regular annual 
retirement allowance for each qualifying teacher to $100 per month. 

Anne Arundel — School bonds 

Chapt. 25, S. B. 29, Special Session 1947, authorizes the County Board 
of Education of Anne Arundel County to borrow in order to finance the con- 
struction, improvement, or extension of public schools subject to the limita- 
tion that the total debt which may be incurred hereunder shall not exceed 
$7,000,000 in the aggregate, including the authorization of $2,500,000 by 
Chapter 434 of the Laws of 1947. 

Anne Arundel — Transportation for parochial children 

Chapt. 75, H. B. 43, Special Session 1947, permits transportation of 
pupils who attend parochial schools on public school buses without changing 
the routes of buses or conveyances now or hereafter established by the Board 
of Education of Anne Arundel County for transporting children to and 
from the public schools. This transportation is to be provided on the same 
terms and conditions as now are or as may be hereafter established by the 
Board of Education of Anne Arundel County for children now attending 
public schools. The County Commissioners of Anne Arundel County are 
authorized to levy and appropriate annually sufficient funds to defray any 
costs incurred by these provisions. This cost shall be determined by the 
County Board of Education, but in no event shall the amount be greater or 
less than the cost of transporting children to public school. 

Baltimore — School bonds 

Chapt. 33, S. B. 39, Special Session 1948, authorizes the County Com- 
missioners of Baltimore County to use, for the purchase of buildings and land 
suitable for public school purposes, money borrowed under Chapter 422 of 
the Acts of 1947. 

Calvert — Transportation for non-profit schools 

Chapt. 11, S. B. 11, Special Session 1948, authorizes the Board of Educa- 
tion of Calvert County to provide transportation for children attending non- 
profit schools which do not receive State aid. This transportation is to be 
provided without changing the routes of buses or conveyances now or here- 
after established by the Board of Education of Calvert County for transporting 
children to and from the public schools. Also, this transportation is to be 
provided on the same terms and conditions as now are or as may be hereafter 
established by the Board of Education of Calvert County for children attend- 
ing public schools. The County Commissioners of Calvert County are 
authorized to levy and appropriate annually sufficient funds to defray any 
costs incurred by these provisions. This cost shall be determined by the 
County Board of Education, but in no event shall the amount be greater or 
less than the cost of transporting children to public school. The provisions 
of this Act are subject to a favorable referendum in November, 1948. (Referen- 
dum unfavorable.) 

Carroll — School bonds 

Chapt. 15, S. B. 16, Special Session 1948, authorizes the County 
Commissioners of Carroll County to issue $1,500,000 in school bonds and 
$1,500,000 in road bonds if there is a favorable referendum in November, 
1948. The school bonds are for the purpose of construction, reconstruction, 
improvement, extension, alteration, and modernization of schools in Carroll 
County, including the cost of acquiring the sites. (Referendum favorable.) 



14 Eighty-Second Annual Report 

Cecil — Retirement of teachers 

Chapt. 36, S. B. 42, Special Session 1948, authorizes and directs the 
County Commissioners of Cecil and Harford Counties to supplement the 
retirement allowances of their retired teachers so that no one receives less 
than $600 per year. 

Charles — Transportation for parochial children 

Chapt. 76, H. B. 44, Special Session 1947, amends Chapt. 918 of the Acts 
of 1947 to permit the Board of Education of Charles County, to provide 
transportation for all children attending public and parochial schools, elimi- 
nating the previous provision preventing the Board of Education from chang- 
ing public school bus routes. 

Harford — Retirement of teachers 

See Chapt. 36, S. B. 42, Special Session 1948, under Cecil County. 

Howard — School bonds 

Chapt. 18, S. B. 19, Special Session 1948, authorizes the County Com- 
missioners of Howard County to borrow $800,000 for the purchase of land 
and the construction and equipment of a Central Senior High School, and 
for the addition of classrooms, an auditorium, and cafeteria at the West 
Friendship Elementary School. The provisions of this Act are subject to a 
favorable referendum in November, 1948. (Referendum unfavorable.) 

St. Mary's — Payment of bonds 

Chapt. 48, H. B. 14, Special Session 1948, requires the use of the State 
Incentive Fund for buildings to pay the interest and principal on the $200,000 
school bond issue authorized by Chapter 674 of the Laws of 1947. In the 
event the Incentive Fund is not sufficient to pay the interest on said notes 
and/or bonds and the principal thereof, the County Commissioners shall 
pay the deficit out of the General Fund of the County or shall levy sufficient 
taxes for this purpose. 

St. Mary's — School bonds 

Chapt. 49, H. B. 15, Special Session 1948, authorizes the issuance of 
$350,000 in school bonds for the purpose of erecting and equipping school 
buildings and building additions to existing school buildings and equipping 
same. The interest and principal to pay off this issue are to be paid from 
the State Incentive Fund for school buildings and supplemented if necessary 
by funds from the General Fund of the County or from county taxes levied 
for this purpose. 

Washington — Washington County Free Library 

Chapt. 26, S. B. 30, Special Session 1947, directs the County Commis- 
sioners of Washington County to contribute annually $20,000 for the care 
and maintenance of the Washington County Free Library. In addition they 
are authorized in their discretion to appropriate not over $10,000 additional 
annually for the above purpose. 

This Act also directs the Mayor and City Council of Hagerstown to 
contribute $13,333.33 annually for the care and maintenance of the Wash- 
ington County Free Library. In addition they are authorized in their dis- 
cretion to appropriate not over $6,666.67 additional annually for the above 
purpose. 

Washington— School building construction and improvement 

Chapt. 10, S. B. 10, Special Session 1948, authorizes and empowers the 
Board of County Commissioners of Washington County (1) to authorize the 
Board of Education to prepare plans for a program of school building construc- 
tion and improvements, (2) to levy and collect taxes in such amount as they, 
in their discretion, deem advisable to cover such expenditures, and (3) to set 
aside the amount collected in a School Improvement Fund. Chapter 1075 of 
the Laws of 1945 which provided for a levy of $100,000 for each of five years 
is repealed. 

Wicomico — School bonds 

Chapt. 12, S. B. 13, Special Session 1948, authorizes the issue of $400,000 
for the construction, aid in construction, making additions and improvements 
to, and equipment of schools on the Anderson Road Site in Salisbury and at 
Pittsville. 



Maryland State Department of Education 15 
FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Schedule of Reimbursement for Adult Educaticn Program 

On October 9, 1947, the following schedule was approved for 
reimbursing the counties for their teachers in the adult education 
programs: 

Years of teaching 
experience in 

evening school 2-hour session 3-hour session 

1 $5.50 $7.00 

2 6.50 8.00 

3 7.50 9.50 

Vacations 

On November 20, 1947, By-Law 51 was amended in part as 
follows: 

A vacation of fifteen working days shall be given each assistant, the 
time for which shall be determined by the county superintendent of schools 

Repeal, Enactment, and Revision of By-Laws 

On February 20, 1948, all by-laws were repealed and enacted in 
the form in which they will appear in the 1948 edition of the State 
School Laws. The following by-laws were revised as indicated : 

By-Law 59 — Professional and Clerical Staff of the County Superin- 
tendent 

The county board of education shall appoint, on the nomination of the 
county superintendent and not later than June fifteenth of the year in which 
the respective vacancies occur, the professional and clerical assistants of the 
county superintendent, and fix their salaries; provided that the tenure of the 
professional assistants shall be the same as that of a teacher. A vacation 
of not less than fifteen working days shall be given each assistant, the time 
for which shall be determined by the county superintendent. Under the 
direction of the county superintendent, the supervisor of pupil personnel 
shall keep a record of each child in the county between the ages of six and 
eighteen years, and submit to the board for the biennial census the number 
of such children on or before June 1, 1918, and every two years thereafter. 

By-Law 60 — Report of Names and Qualifications of County School 
Officials 

The State Superintendent shall report to the State Board of Education 
at its next subsequent meeting the names and qualifications of all superin- 
tendents and other professional assistants approved under authority of 
Sections 131 and 142, together with a statement of the amount of their salaries 
to be borne by the State. 

By-Law 61 — Accommodations for and Duties of County Professional 
Assistants 

The county board of education shall provide suitable office space and 
equipment for the professional assistants of the county superintendent. 
When not visiting schools or otherwise officially employed, they shall spend 
their time in the office performing such duties, consistent with their positions, 
as may be assigned by the superintendent; and they shall not engage in any 
other gainful occupation while filling their respective positions. 

By-Law 63 — Pledge of Student at State Teachers Colleges 

Every student admitted to a Maryland State Teachers College without 



16 Eighty-Second Annual Report 

having to pay tuition shall sign the following pledge: 

"In obedience to the Laws of Maryland governing exemption 
from payment of tuition fees in the State Teachers College, 
I hereby obligate myself to teach in the public schools of the 
State for a period of at least two years after being graduated 
from the State Teachers College at 



Election of Officers of the State Board of Education 

On April 15, 1948, Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes was reelected 
President of the State Board of Education and Dr. Nicholas Orem 
was elected Vice-President. Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., was re- 
elected State Superintendent of Schools for another 4-year term. 

Day Nurseries, Child Care Centers, and Similar Institutions 

The Board, on April 15, 1948, passed the following resolution 
concerning day nurseries, child care centers, and similar institutions: 
Resolved: That in the light of the Attorney General's opinion 
dated February 27, 1948, the State Board of Education shall 
consider that day nurseries or child care centers or similar 
institutions, however designated, where no specific educational 
program is given, are not nursery schools and therefore do not 
come under the provisions of Chapter 489 of the Acts of 1947, 
Section 14A of Article 77. Since the law gives the State Board 
of Education authority over educational institutions only, the 
Board shall exercise no jurisdiction over day nurseries and 
similar institutions, except that it shall not permit them to use 
the word "school" in their names. 

Resignations 

On April 15, 1948, the Board accepted with regret the request 
for retirement by Miss Bessie C. Stern, Director of the Bureau of 
Finance, Statistics, and Educational Measurements, effective as of 
August 1, 1948. Mr. David W. Zimmerman was appointed Acting 
Director as of July 1, 1948, and Director on August 1, 1948. The 
Board adopted the following resolution with regard to Miss Stern: 
"Miss Bessie C. Stern, Director of the Bureau of Finance, 
Statistics, and Educational Measurements, who has requested 
retirement as of August 1, 1948, has devoted herself tirelessly 
to the interests of the Maryland public schools since 1921. At 
that time she became statistician in the Bureau of Educational 
Measurements, which was established in 1921 with a grant from 
the General Education Board. In 1939 she became Director of 
the Bureau of Educational Measurements and in 1945 assumed 
the title of Director of the Bureau of Finance, Statistics, and 
Educational Measurements. 

"Miss Stern did her undergraduate work at Cornell Uni- 
versity, later took a course in accounting, and in 1921 qualified 
for the degree of Master of Education at Harvard. She has 
since studied at Columbia and the University of Chicago. 

"Miss Stern began her career as a teacher of German and 
French at Silver Creek, New York. In 1911 she did statistical 
work for the New York City Committee on School Inquiry and 
in 1914 became examiner for the City Committee on Education, 
of the Board of Estimates and Apportionment. Between 1918 
and her appointment at the State Department of Education in 
Maryland, she was a statistician with the United States Ship- 
ping Board and later was office manager in a silk factory. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



"To Miss Stern belongs the credit of establishing the 
Bureau of Measurements and Statistics and of developing it to 
its present status. The Division is responsible for handling 
all the finances of the Department including State aid to county 
schools; gathers and analyzes statistical data relating to the 
State public school system; and gives advice and help with 
regard to standard tests. The Annual Report, which is pub- 
lished by the Division, has received wide commendation as 
being unusually comprehensive and helpful. Miss Stern has 
given invaluable assistance also in working out plans for 
changes in forms of State aid. 

"The State Board cannot express too strongly its admira- 
tion and respect for Miss Stern. She has been an indefatigable 
worker, and through her experience and detailed study of 
school and State finance has become one of the leading experts 
in those fields, not only in Maryland but in the entire country. 
Furthermore, her intimate knowledge of the operations of 
school systems is remarkable. The State Board is proud of her 
achievements and of the recognition that has been accorded her 
as an expert in her field. 

"The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the ad- 
mirable work Miss Stern has done and to wish for her many 
years of leisure in which she may enjoy to the full whatever 
avocations may contribute most to her happiness." 

The Board also accepted with regret the request of Miss E. Sue 
Walter for retirement, effective as of July 1, 1948. The following 
resolution was passed: 

"Miss E. Sue Walter has been a member of the State De- 
partment of Education under three State Superintendents. She 
was appointed as bookkeeper under the superintendency of Dr. 
M. Bates Stephens, in 1919, when the offices were in McCoy 
Hall. Most of her service was rendered under the superin- 
tendency of Dr. Albert S. Cook, under whom she became 
receptionist and whose appointments she made. She has com- 
pleted her service in the Department under the direction of the 
present State Superintendent, Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., and 
has thus been a member of the Department over a period of near- 
ly thirty years. 

"The initial contact which anyone has with an office is 
extremely important and many people have commented on the 
cordiality with which Miss Walter greeted callers and on the 
courtesy and kindness with which she expedited their business. 
She has come to know and be known by a great many people in 
the Maryland public school system and by many others who are 
interested in public education. They will miss the voice and 
the presence which have so long been identified with the State 
Department of Education. 

"The members of the State Board of Education hope that 
Miss Walter will have many years of leisure and happiness. 
She carries with her the best wishes of the Board." 

The request of Dr. E. Clarke Fontaine for retirement, as of 
June 30, 1948, was accepted by the Board which unanimously 
passed the following resolution: 

"Dr. E. Clarke Fontaine, Supervisor of High Schools, who 
retired as of June 30, 1948, has been connected with the public 
school system of Maryland during most of his distinguished 
career as an educator. From 190'2 to 1912 he taught Latin, 
French, and mathematics in the Pocomoke High School. After 
an interval of two years, during which he taught at the Gilman 
Country School, Roland Park, and the Stuyvesant School, 
Warrenton, Virginia, he returned to Pocomoke High School as 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 

principal and served in this capacity until 1920. He then be- 
came principal of the Cumberland High School and in 1921 
accepted an invitation to become the second State Supervisor 
of High Schools in Maryland. He therefore shared with the 
late Dr. Samuel M. North the responsibility and the honor of 
standardizing Maryland high schools. Over the years, also, he 
has frequently taught summer school at the University of Mary- 
land and Johns Hopkins University, and once at Bates College, 
Maine. 

"Dr. Fontaine did his undergraduate work at St. John's 
College, Annapolis, where he received also his Master's degree. 
Washington College, Chestertown, conferred upon him in 1931 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters. 

"Dr. Fontaine has been among the most forward-looking 
educators in Maryland. He has been vitally interested in im- 
proving classroom instruction, helping to evolve a more func- 
tional program of offerings in the high schools, and interpreting 
the schools and their purposes to the public. To these ends he 
has frequently visited the schools in his area, has supervised the 
revision of curricula, has led or has otherwise participated in 
group conferences, has published much for general use by pro- 
fessional and lay people, and has appeared before citizen groups 
in the interests of the public schools. 

"Especially notable in the work Dr. Fontaine has done 
during his connection with the State Department of Education 
have been the bulletins he has written and published under the 
auspices of the Department. During the earlier years, he wrote 
three bulletins dealing with the teaching of the social sciences, 
with a course in problems of democracy, and with teaching oral 
and written English. The bulletins have stimulated improve- 
ments in Maryland high schools and have received wide recogni- 
tion beyond the State borders. In December 1942, he wrote 
Redirection of the School Program in Wartime and two years 
later The Public and Its Schools. Both volumes have been used 
as the basis for many regional and State conferences. Further- 
more, Dr. Fontaine served as chairman of important com- 
mittees at the workshops held at Towson during the summers of 
1945, 1946, and 1947, and thus had major responsibility for the 
lengthy committee reports which guided the transition of the 
State public schools from an eleven- to a twelve-year system. 

"Another accomplishment through which Dr. Fontaine re- 
flected credit upon the Department was the writing of a text- 
book entitled Ways to Better Teaching in the High School. This 
has been used not only in the secondary schools of Maryland 
but in professional courses in universities throughout tne coun- 
try. 

"The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the 
admirable contribution Dr. Fontaine has made to the educa- 
tion of Maryland youth over a period of approximately forty-five 
years, and hopes he will enjoy many years of happy leisure." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

Three significant developments in the fields of curriculum and 
supervision mark the year 1947-48: a tri-purpose workshop at 
Towson during the summer of 1947; provision of more adequate 
consultant service to the counties; and a spring conference rep- 
resentative of the growing sense of continuity in the educational 
program, grades one through twelve. 

The first phase of the tri-purpose workshop at Towson was the 
Supervisory conference during the summer of 1947. Supervisors of 
the State Department of Education and of the counties held a 
three-day conference at the State Teachers College, Towson, to 
reconsider program and relationships in the light of the newly 
created county high school supervisory positions and to project the 
program for the following year. In the general sessions of the con- 
ference, outstanding educators, recognized as specialists in the field 
of supervision, discussed such topics as the following: The Essential 
Nature of Supervision, Types of Supervisory Services, the Super- 
visor as a Curriculum Worker, the Supervisor as a Leader in Group 
Planning, Supervision that Builds Local Leadership, (Supervision 
that Builds Local Leadership in Maryland,) Utilizing the Group 
Conference Technique, Human Relations in Supervision, and the 
Supervisor as a Person in the Community. Each of the presentations 
was followed by group discussions of the implications and applica- 
tions of the points of view elaborated. To assure that each super- 
visor would be engaged in the process of evaluating the program of 
supervision critically, the conference organized itself into small 
discussion groups. 

The second phase of the workshop program, of which the Super- 
visory Conference was the first, was a workshop of representative 
teachers from the counties, who during the preceding year had been 
developing in their classrooms unified programs of general education 
in line with the theories advanced in the State workshops of 1945 
and 1946. For a period of three weeks, these representative teachers 
met in groups to report in detail their experiences in creating unified 
programs in their classrooms and to edit these accounts for publica- 
tion. One of the groups produced a report on safety in the educational 
program, grades one through twelve; a second group produced a re- 
port on resources education; a third on consumer education; and a 
fourth on education for recreation. 

A third phase of this summer program consisted of a conference 
workshop of high school principals, who in a period of ten days pro- 
duced an administrative manual for the senior high school. 

A second significant development of the 1947-48 school year 
which helped to advance the curriculum program in the State, was 
the provision of more adequate consultant service to the counties. 
This service was made possible by an appropriation for the De- 
partment. 

Specialists in the field of curriculum and supervision, along with 
State supervisors, planned and participated cooperatively with 



20 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



county educators in conferences and workshops giving consultative 
service concerning curriculum problems and instructional materials. 
The conferences and workshops were held at both State and county 
levels. During this year the workshop program was taken over 
gradually by the counties in order to facilitate participation by an 
increased number of teachers. 

An aspect of the increased consultant service was the estab- 
lishing of curriculum laboratories at Towson and Bowie State 
Teachers Colleges. The latest and best curriculum materials, both 
instructional and professional, were assembled at these centers for 
use by county and State personnel. 

Consultant service on the local level was further strengthened 
by the 1947 legislation which provided for the appointment of high 
school supervisors in the counties. Until 1947 supervision of Mary- 
land county high schools was organized on a regional basis with 
three supervisors from the State Department of Education serving 
the county high schools. Several of the large counties supplemented 
this program by providing local high school supervisors. 

The retirement of Dr. E. Clarke Fontaine, at the close of the 
1947-48 school year, after a long and outstanding career of super- 
visory service in the State, (see page 17 regarding Dr. Fontaine's 
retirement) may be said to bring to a close Maryland's plan of 
regional high school supervision. 

At this time the supervisory staff of the State Department of 
Education began to read apt its program in the light of the provision 
of adequate high school supervision on the county level. To effect 
the supervisory and curriculum programs equitably throughout the 
State, a Supervisor and Assistant Supervisor of Curriculum were 
appointed. The newly appointed Supervisor and Assistant Super- 
visor of Curriculum began immediately to expand the resources 
of the State curriculum laboratories at Towson and Bowie State 
Teachers Colleges and to make these centers an integral part of the 
State curriculum program. 

At this time the State Department of Education initiated a pro- 
gram of audio-visual education. A film library was established to 

(a) assist supervisors with their in-service programs for teachers; 

(b) promote a more functional kind of education in the schools; 

(c) interpret educational policies and practices to parents and other 
adult groups. 

The third significant development of the year 1947-48 was the 
growing sense of continuity in the educational program, grades one 
through twelve. In recognition of this concept, the High School 
Principal's Conference was converted into the Maryland Educational 
Conference made up of elementary and high school principals and 
supervisors. The conference in the spring of 1948 was planned as a 
culminating professional activity and was devoted to " Implementing 
Maryland's Educational Program Through Cooperative Leadership." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



Child Study 

The school year 1947-48 was the third year of the State-wide 
program for child study. The work for the year began with two two- 
week workshops for all third-year leaders, one for white leaders and 
one for colored leaders, and continued with meetings in January 
and March at each of the four teachers colleges for leaders of first, 
second, and third year groups. Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, who had 
joined the faculty at the University of Maryland as Director of the 
Child Study Institute, was chief consultant for the program aided 
by members of the Institute staff. The third-year work emphasized 
the direct study of children as members of groups, building on the 
work of the two previous years. Participants were introduced to the 
study of group dynamics, the making and interpretation of socio- 
grams, and the use of operational anecdotes as a means of studying 
pupils in peer groups. This year marked the largest number of 
participants in child study. Approximately 3,000 white teachers 
participated, a growth from 30 per cent of all white teachers in 
1946-1947 to 53 per cent in 1947-1948. The number of white teachers 
participating in the counties ranged from 25.4 per cent in Baltimore 
County to 92.8 per cent in Kent County. This year also marked a 
trend in the counties- to procure services of child study consultants 
to work directly with the teachers, nine of the counties having this 
service: Anne Arundel, Allegany, Baltimore, Harford, Montgomery, 
Prince George's, Somerset, Washington, and Worcester. This trend 
was most promising, indicating that the counties would eventually 
assume responsibility for the program as it developed on the local 
level, with consultants working directly with the teachers as needed. 

This was the first year that money was appropriated for a 
State program for child study. The program had previously been 
financed by the counties and the State teachers colleges. The coun- 
ties plan to continue to help support the program, since it is con- 
sidered one of the fnest types of in-service training that can be 
given teachers. With county and State funds, the child study pro- 
gram can provide more services to teachers than it hitherto has 
done. 

As in the white schools, the child study program in the colored 
schools, in its third year of the three-year cycle, continued to ex- 
pand. By June 1948, approximately 85 per cent of all colored 
teachers had had the benefits of one or more years of participation. 
Rather conclusive evidence as to its effect on teaching practices 
was shaping up in the reduction of overageness, pupil failures, and 
disciplinary problems. Approximately seventy supervisors and 
teachers attended the series of leadership conferences held at Bowie 
in the fall, winter, and spring. 

High School Supervision 

The work in high school supervision concerned itself primarily 
with developing with the county high school supervisors a clear 
conception of the job of the local supervisor. This involved a series 
of individual and group conferences. Growing out of these con- 



22 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



ferences were a series of workshops, conducted by the supervisors 
in the several counties and attended by representative teachers, 
where intensive curriculum work was undertaken. As an aid to the 
supervisors in working with the teachers on the curriculum, the 
services of Dr. Harold Alberty of Ohio State University were made 
available for visits to several counties and for individual and group 
conferences. 

Progress was made during this year toward closer coordination 
of the work in the white and colored schools. This coordination 
was made possible, to a large extent, at the county level, by the 
high school supervisors who accepted the responsibility for super- 
vision of both white and colored secondary schools. 

The major responsibility of the State supervisor for colored 
schools was to work with the local supervisors through conferences 
and school visits in furthering the shift from an eleven- to a twelve- 
year program, in giving overall direction to the third year of the 
child study program and in orienting the Assistant Supervisor of 
Curriculum. 

Maryland School Health Program 

Of special significance during this year was the further improve- 
ment of the school health program in the State. To this end con- 
ferences were held with superintendents, supervisors, principals, and 
teachers. Meetings were held also with the State Department of 
Health personnel to implement the health service in the schools. 
Conferences with staff members of the colleges were carried on 
to identify the professional educational problems and to seek their 
solutions. In several meetings with staff members of the State De- 
partment of Education, State Department of Health, and consultants 
plans were made for the outdoor education and health education 
workshops to be held at the State Teachers College at Towson dur- 
ing the summer months in 1948. 

Many aspects of the health service program received careful 
consideration by the State School Health Council through studies of 
vital problems and policies. Two bulletins were published and dis- 
tributed. In addition, subcommittees reported progress in the 
development of handbooks outlining policies and procedures in 
carrying out the school health service program. An extensive plan 
was developed to give audio-visual tests to children in selected 
grades of all schools. 

Numerous clinic programs for school children were inaugurated 
in many counties. Nutrition studies were started in Prince George's 
and Allegany Counties. Some counties developed school health 
councils, while others extended the activities of their councils. 
Baltimore County initiated its school health program through the 
cooperative efforts of the County Departments of Education and 
Health, with its direction under Dr. Patricia Thomeson. 

A study of the health, physical education, and recreation pro- 
gram in the county schools was begun by Allegany County under 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



the leadership of the staff. Several counties participated in its pro- 
jection. Dr. Lloyd Jones of Pennsylvania State College and mem- 
bers of the State Department of Education acted as consultants. 
This project is scheduled to continue for three or more years and 
will involve personnel in and out of the schools concerned with these 
programs. 

The bi-monthly meetings of supervisors of health, physical 
education, and recreation, and health personnel from the counties 
and Baltimore City have served as a clearing house for consideration 
of problems, procedures, and policies regarding these programs in 
the schools. Resource materials, which have been developed in the 
counties and by publishers, were exhibited for review by the group. 

The athletic program in our schools has been studied by the 
Maryland Public School Athletic Association. A platform statement 
outlining the functions and relationships to county programs was 
adopted by the representative assemblies of both the white and 
colored associations. Tournaments were operated on the State 
level in soccer, f eldball, cross country, basketball, volleyball, and 
track and field athletics. These tournaments were operated by sub- 
committees of the athletic associations. 

In-service training clinics were conducted by the State Depart- 
ment of Education, in conjunction with the State Department of 
Health, the Maryland Public School Athletic Association, and the 
Maryland Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Association. 
These clinics included demonstrations, interpretations, training, and 
organization of various aspects of the program. Mrs. Ruth Ehlers 
of the National Recreation Association carried on recreational 
institutes for teachers, students, and lay personnel in several coun- 
ties. This latter program was directed to the development of rec- 
reational leadership in schools and in civic organizations. 

A decided gain was realized also in the field of recreation by the 
inauguration of school-community programs in Allegany, Prince 
George's, Wicomico, and Baltimore Counties. Many recreational 
projects were undertaken in several counties involving the use of 
school facilities and personnel. 

Conferences During 1947-48 

Conferences sponsored and directed cooperatively by the State 
and county staffs included the following: 

1. Fall regional conferences of county Supervisors and prin- 
cipals of colored high schools 

General Theme — "Evaluating our School Programs in 
Terms of the Imperative Needs of Youth" 

2. State-wide conferences with the supervisors of vocational 
education in agriculture and home economics 

3. State-wide conference of supervisors and principals in 
Baltimore, May 7 and 8 

Theme — "Implementing Maryland's Educational Program 
through Cooperative Leadership" 



24 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



Special Education 

The main emphasis in special education in the counties during 
1947-48 was on the conservation of hearing program. In September, 
1947, the State Department of Education in cooperation with the 
State Department of Health embarked upon a planned conservation 
of hearing program. 

Dr. Marie Wheatley and Dr. David W. Zimmerman of the 
Staff of the State Department of Education appeared before the 
State Board of Education in November, 1947, to present the com- 
prehensive program for the prevention of deafness. 

Plans for this program included the testing with an audiometer 
of all elementary children in grades 2 to 6 inclusive in order to identify 
those with a hearing loss of 15 decibels or approximately 20 per cent. 
The Maryland State School for the Deaf has agreed to supply a 
full-time audiometrist and if necessary to employ a second person 
during 1948-49. In some of the larger counties the health and educa- 
tion departments cooperated in the purchase of an audiometer and 
arranged to employ a full-time person to do the testing. When this 
latter plan was followed Dr. Wheatley was responsible for the train- 
ing of the local audiometrist. 

Following the testing, hearing clinics were available in each 
county under the supervision of Dr. M. L. Breitstein. Dr. Breitstein 
was appointed consultant for these clinics, effective September 1, 
1947. 

The purpose of the clinic is to provide a competent otologist to 
make a thorough examination of the children who show an apparent 
loss of hearing. Recommendations are made for medical treatment. 

The plan for carrying out the conservation of hearing program 
is initiated in county meetings of educational and health personnel. 
Prior to a screening program using a pure tone audiometer, there is a 
conference in each school between the principal and the technician. 
Parents are informed of the testing by letter. Children failing the 
test are given a complete audiometric test and the results are recorded 
on the school health card. Teachers and parents are informed of the 
results, and appointments are made for clinics. Parents who wish 
may take their children to private physicians. Diagnosis and treat- 
ment through ear clinics are provided for all children showing a 
specific hearing loss as well as ear, nose, and throat conditions which 
might lead to deafness. 

The educational follow-up and rehabilitation may involve one 
or more of the following: favorable seating, lip-reading instruction, 
speech correction, acoustic aids and training, tutoring and remedial 
work, psychological testing, guidance and placement, and informa- 
tion to parents and teacher. 



Maryland State Department of Education 25 

DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 
Certification 

In July 1947, an Assistant Supervisor of Certification was ap- 
pointed to handle most of the routine work in connection with the 
certification of teachers. 

The 1947 General Assembly provided State aid for several new 
positions in the county schools. It therefore became necessary to 
formulate requirements for certification in these areas and the State 
Board of Education adopted requirements as follows: 

Certification in high school supervision 

A certificate in high school supervision, valid throughout the State 
for three years, renewable on evidence of successful experience and 
professional spirit, required of county supervisors of high schools, may 
be granted to persons who have had a year of graduate work, chiefly in 
appropriate Methods and Supervision, and who have had four years of 
satisfactory teaching experience. 

Upon special request of a county superintendent, the State Super- 
intendent may issue such a certificate on a minimum of twelve semester 
hours of graduate work, chiefly in appropriate Methods and Supervision, 
with the provision that eighteen semester hours of additional graduate 
work, approved by the State Superintendent, shall be completed within 
five years. 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

A certificate for the position of Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I, 
valid throughout the State for three years, renewable on evidence of 
successful experience and professional spirit and required of any person 
holding a position as Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I, may be issued to 
an applicant who has graduated at a standard college, who has had three 
years of successful teaching experience, and who has had a year of 
graduate work, chiefly in courses in Pupil Personnel, including the 
following: 

Personal Growth and Development 

Counseling Techniques 

Social Case Work (with supervised field work) 
Educational Tests and Measurements 
Aptitudes and Aptitude Testing 

Mental Hygiene with Emphasis on the Psychiatric Approach 
Upon special request of a county superintendent, the State Super- 
intendent may issue such a certificate on a minimum of twelve semester 
hours of graduate work, chiefly in pupil personnel studies, with the 
provision that eighteen semester hours' additional graduate work, ap- 
proved by the State Superintendent, shall be completed within five 
years; provided that any person serving as a county attendance officer in 
1946-47 who does not meet the foregoing qualifications shall be issued a 
certificate for the position of Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II. 

Visiting teacher 

A certificate for the position of visiting teacher, valid throughout the 
State for three years, renewable on evidence of successful experience and 
professional spirit and required of visiting teachers, may be issued to a 
person who qualifies for a Maryland teacher's certificate, based on a 
degree, who has had three years of successful teaching experience and 
who has had courses in the following fields: 

Personal Growth and Development 

Counseling Techniques 

Social Case Work (with supervised field work) ; 
provided that the State Superintendent may, upon the recommendation 
of a county superintendent, issue a one-year certificate to an applicant 



26 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



who has not had the foregoing courses; provided, further, that the 
certificate shall not be renewed until the full requirement is met. 

To tide over the next few years, the State Superintendent is author- 
ized to issue Emergency Certificates corresponding to the War Emergency 
Certificates. The latter will be valid until the end of the school year when 
the war is declared officially closed. 

County superintendents shall appoint qualified applicants whenever 
possible to replace teachers holding War Emergency or Emergency 
Certificates. 



The State Board adopted on May 28, and July 17, 1947, the 
following revisions of certificate requirements: 



Content requirement for certification in high school science 

Six semester hours each of chemistry, physics, and biology; at least 
twelve semester hours in one of these three sciences; and three semester 
hours in other sciences, such as the following: 



Content requirement for certification in social studies 

Twenty-four semester hours in social studies distributed as follows: 

eighteen semester hours in history, including American History; and six 

semester hours in economics, sociology, political science, geography, or 

Consumer Education. 

It is recommended that more than six semester hours in these allied 

fields be presented. 

Requirement for certification in guidance 

Counselors who are to spend less than half their time in guidance 
services must have met the regular requirements for High School Teach- 
ers' Certificates, shall have had at least two years of teaching experience, 
and must present credit for at least six semester hours in guidance 
courses, including principles and practices in guidance, techniques of 
counseling, and occupational information. These courses shall preferably 
be given on a graduate level. 

Counselors who are to spend half or more of their time in guidance 
services must have met the regular requirements for High School Teach- 
ers' Certificates, shall have had at least three years of teaching experience, 
and must present credit for at least twelve semester hours in guidance 
courses, including the areas necessary for part-time certification in 
guidance, and, in addition, analysis of the individual (with utilization 
of test results), mental hygiene in the classroom, and occupational ad- 
justment to business and industry. 

Certification for junior high school teaching 

Both High School Teachers' Certificates and Elementary School 
Teachers' Certificates shall be accepted for the time being for teaching in 
the junior high school. 

A junior high school teacher's certificate, valid throughout the 
State for three years, renewable on evidence of successful experience and 
professional spirit and six weeks' additional preparation in a standard 
institution, and valid in a State-aided junior high school, may be granted 
to an applicant who has graduated at a standard college, has had twelve 
semester hours of work in each of the three fields, English, social studies, 
and science, and has had sixteen semester hours in education, including 
Adolescent Psychology and Principles and Methods of Teaching in the 
Junior High School, and at least twenty-five clock hours of practice teach- 
ing in the core curriculum. 

For certification in any one subject the applicant must present credit 
for eighteen semester hours of college work in that field. 

Certificate in elementary school supervision 

A certificate in elementary school supervision, valid throughout the 



Geology 
Astronomy 
Meteorology 



Radio 
Physiology 
Conservation 



Agriculture 



Maryland State Department of Education 

State for three years, renewable on evidence of successful experience and 
professional spirit, required of county supervisors of elementary schools, 
may be granted to persons who have had a year of graduate work, 
chiefly in Elementary Methods and Supervision, and who have had four 
years of satisfactory teaching experience. 

Upon special request of a county superintendent, the State Super- 
intendent may issue such a certificate on a minimum of twelve semester 
hours of graduate work, chiefly in Elementary Methods and Supervision, 
with the provision that eighteen semester hours of additional graduate 
work, approved by the State Superintendent, shall be completed within 
five years. The list of elective courses in Secondary Education acceptable 
toward the requirements for a High School Teacher's Certificate shall be 
increased by the addition of the following courses: 

A Audio- Visual Education 
B Guidance 

Revised requirement in Observation and Practice Teaching, in place of 
paragraph 13, page 58, of the State School Laws, 1944 edition: 

The course in Observation and Practice Teaching shall cover three 
semester hours of work. Not fewer than twenty-five clock hours of the 
course shall be devoted to responsible teaching, supplemented by con- 
ferences. It is recommended that this experience be given over a five- 
week period with one high school or junior high school class. 

The Practice Teaching should preferably be done in connection with 
Special Methods during the last year of college or later and must be in 
a subject in which the applicant will qualify for certification. 

Credits for the renewal of certificates 

For the full renewal of a teacher's or a principal's certificate the 
summer school or other credits which are to be accepted as evidence of 
the professional growth necessary for the full renewal of a certificate 
must total at least six semester hours. The credits may be earned in 
summer school or in a winter session. This requirement shall be effective 
for credits earned subsequent to the summer of 1946. 

Definition of "year of credit" 

For certificate purposes, a "year of credit" shall be considered thirty 
semester hours. This definition shall be used in determining the quali- 
fications for certificates in 1948-49 and subsequently. 

Standards for workshops 

Beginning with the school year 1947-48, workshops which are to be 
accepted as satisfactory evidence of professional growth for the full 
renewal of certificates must extend over a period of at least thirty days. 
The individual concerned must be certified by the superintendent or by 
the appropriate college official to have accomplished work worth six 
semester hours of college credit. 

Acceptable workshops extending over from two to five weeks may be 
used for proportional satisfaction of the requirement for renewal. 

Child study work 

Three years of participation in a child study group may be accepted 
as evidence of professional growth for the full renewal of a certificate, 
provided the applicant is certified by the superintendent to have done 
satisfactory work throughout the period. 

War Emergency Certificates 

At the meeting held on May 28, 1947, the Board also decided to con- 
tinue issuing War Emergency Certificates. Such certificates are valid 
until the end of the school year when the war is declared officially closed. 
Teachers holding these certificates are to be replaced by qualified ap- 
plicants as these become available. 



28 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



Accreditation 



Legislation passed in 1945 and strengthened in 1947 makes the 
State Superintendent responsible for the approval of all nonpublic 
schools except those which operate under bona fide church organiza- 
tions or with State charters. 

To work with the nonpublic schools the Division of Accreditation 
was established, with a Director and an Assistant Supervisor, to- 
gether with the necessary stenographic and clerical help. An 
Assistant Supervisor from the Division of Instruction also was given 
the responsibility of working with the Division of Accreditation in 
the areas of the nursery school, the kindergarten, and the elementary 
school. 

The f rst task of the Division of Accreditation was to find out 
what schools and what types of schools were in existence. All sources 
of information were thoroughly canvassed and the various categories 
were determined. 

Committees composed of several members of the Department 
and outside experts in the fields in which the instruction was being 
offered then drew up tentative requirements for all the different 
types of schools. General standards also were formulated. Copies 
of the requirements and a request for suggestions for changes then 
went to the schools which would be affected. Very few schools either 
made suggestions or indicated objections to the requirements. The 
State Board of Education therefore adopted the general standards 
and special ones for schools in the following areas: 

Nursery Secondary 
Kindergartens Junior colleges 



Beginning in the summer of 1947, members of the Accreditation 
Division and other members of the Department with special knowl- 
edge of the types of schools to be studied visited every nonpublic 
school in the State. The Department also engaged outside experts, 
including some from surrounding states, to help determine whether 
the various schools should be recommended for approval. The rec- 
ommendations in most cases were favorable, though suggestions for 
improvement were made in connection with certain schools. In a 
few cases it was necessary to request that conditions be changed be- 
fore certificates of approval were issued. 

Two hundred thirty-nine schools were approved as of January 
1, 1948, the date when the law became effective. By July 1, 1948, 
this number had been increased to two hundred eighty-four. 

The State Superintendent took the position that no school in 
existence when the law went into effect should be closed arbitrarily. 



Elementary 
Aerial navigation 
Art, drama, music, speech, 



Tutoring 
Flying 

Merchant and marine licensing 



and "special education" 
Automobile mechanics 
Barber 
Beauty 
Business 
Dance 



(Preparation for examination) 
Oil burner 
Photography 
Practical nursing 
Radio and electrical 
Refrigeration and/or air conditioning 
Watchmaking 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



It was assumed, furthermore, that while few if any schools would 
meet the standards exactly, all the schools would try to approach 
them gradually. A number of schools have improved markedly 
since the State Department began its work in this field. 

When a new school wishes to open, the Division of Accreditation, 
sometimes with outside help, studies the application, the course of 
study, the quarters which are to be used, and the training of the 
teaching staff. If these are satisfactory, the school is permitted to 
start, pending a later visit from members of the Division, other 
members of the State Department of Education, and, if desirable, 
outside advisers. If the school is carrying out well the plans which 
it has submitted, the State Superintendent issues a certificate of 
approval. If a new type of school wishes to operate, the Division 
employs an advisory committee of competent specialists in the 
particular field to draw up standards and may use a member or 
members of the same committee to visit the school. 

The number of schools approved between January 1 and July 
1, 1948, in the various categories, are indicated in the following table. 



Types of schools Number approved 

Nursery 77 

Kindergartens 77 

Primary 8 

Elementary 28 

Secondary 18 

Tutoring 8 

Special 3 

Professional 2 

Junior colleges 2 

Art 4 

Barber 1 

Beauty 18 

Business 20 

Cleaning and dyeing 1 

Drafting 1 

Dramatics 2 

Electricity 1 

Flight 26 

Music 35 

Navigation 4 

Oil burner 1 

Photography 5 

Radio and television 5 

Refrigeration and air conditioning 3 

Speaking (Effective Speaking) 1 

Speech 1 

Special Education 1 

Tailoring 1 

Transportation rating 1 

Watchmaking 4 



The total number of schools in the preceding list is not exactly 
the same as the figures mentioned earlier, because some schools have 
been approved for several types of instruction. 

The approval of dance schools was delayed beyond July 1, 1948, 
because of the difficulty in agreeing upon standards and in employing 
experts who might help to survey the schools. 



30 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The Division of Library Extension works throughout the State 
with staffs of public libraries, schools, State hospitals and institutions, 
and groups and individuals interested in developing, improving, 
and interpreting library services. In order to carry out the program 
of improved library service, the staff of the Division was increased 
in the 1947-48 State budget. As a result four new professional 
positions and three new clerical positions were added. 

The professional positions included a supervisor of school and 
children's libraries, a supervisor of county and institution libraries, 
a readers' counselor, and a technical counselor. 

The activities of the Supervisor of School and Children's 
Libraries during her first year included: (1) A survey of school 
libraries in seven counties and visits to schools in six other counties; 
(2) Visits to training classes for teacher-librarians; (3) Consultant 
in county-wide teachers' meetings and county workshops. 

In addition to working with the county librarians and the 
county boards of library trustees to improve library service for all 
county residents, the new Supervisor of County and Institutional 
Libraries worked in close cooperation with the State hospitals and 
correctional institutions in surveying their library needs. 

As a result of an agreement between the Division of Library 
Extension, the State Department of Health, and the Maryland 
Tuberculosis Association, a demonstration library project was under- 
taken at the Victor Cullen Tuberculosis Hospital near Sabillasville. 
This project was undertaken to show the value of good library service 
in the rehabilitation and therapy of tuberculous patients. The 
Maryland Tuberculosis Association agreed to finance this project 
for a period of two years. 

The Readers' Counselor, also provided in the 1947-48 State 
Budget, heads reference and circulation. She selects materials re- 
quested to supplement public and school libraries, serves individuals 
in the counties which do not have public libraries, and borrows from 
other libraries for residents of the counties. The Technical Counselor 
is responsible for cataloging and ordering of books and other library 
materials, supplies, and equipment. 

County Libraries 

During 1947-48, library service was available to residents in ten 
counties and Baltimore City. These ten counties operating libraries 
in accordance with the provisions of the 1945 Public Libraries Law, 
were Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Cecil, Garrett, Harford, Howard, 
Prince George's, Queen Anne's, Talbot, and Wicomico. The General 
Assembly of 1945 passed the Public Libraries Law which gives the 
Boards of County Commissioners the power to establish and main- 
tain public libraries. When county tax money of not less than two 
cents on each one hundred dollars of assessed valuation of taxable 
property is made available for library support, the county is eligible 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



for an annual grant of State aid for books, which ranges from eight 
cents to two cents per capita, according to the population of the 
county. 

State aid distributed to libraries operating under the 1945 public 
libraries law amounted to $40,279 in 1947-48 as compared to $19,980 
in 1946-47. 

In 1947-48, seven bookmobiles operated in seven counties (Anne 
Arundel, Cecil, Garrett, Harford, Prince George's, Talbot, and 
Wicomico) as compared with four in 1946-47 and one in 1945-46. 
These libraries on wheels run on announced schedules and stop for 
library service in small communities, schools, and group meetings. 
The Prince George's County bookmobile makes one hundred stops 
once each month. In other counties, with fewer stops, service is 
given every two weeks. 

The progress in improving and increasing public library service 
throughout the State has been due not only to the leadership of the 
Division of Library Extension, but to the interest and work of many 
individuals, groups, and organizations. Among these groups are the 
Maryland Library Association, the Maryland Congress of Parents 
and Teachers, the Homemakers, the League of Women Voters, the 
Maryland State Teachers Association, the Maryland Federation of 
Women's Clubs, the American Association of University Women, 
the Farm Bureau, the Grange, and the service clubs. 



32 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
Agriculture 

An essential part of the agriculture program throughout the 
State has been the activities provided for rural youth in the organiza- 
tions, Future Farmers of America and New Farmers of America. 
During the year 1947-48, the State officers of these organizations met 
to plan ways of improving the program in their local groups. As a 
result, leadership training classes were held for local chapter officers 
and a mimeographed paper. The Maryland Future Farmer, made 
its appearance for the first time. 

The State Supervisor of Agriculture, working with local agricul- 
ture teachers, prepared the following bulletins: Suggested Evaluative 
Criteria for Maryland Teachers of Vocational Agriculture, Course of 
Study in Farm Forestry, Teaching Farm Veteran Classes. 

The following agriculture conferences were held: Annual 
summer conference of vocational agriculture teachers at Solomons 
Island, Teachers of Veterans at Easton and Towson, Mid-year con- 
ference of colored vocational agriculture teachers at Annapolis. 

Home Economics 

During the year 1947-48 the separate administration of the 
school lunch program was carried out quite fully in the high schools, 
relieving the home economics teachers of this responsibility. These 
teachers continue to act in an advisory capacity concerning nutrition 
and cafeteria management. 

Teacher turnover has been a serious problem in the home econo- 
mics program. With the present high salary schedule, well qualified 
teachers have been secured in most cases. Because the enrollment 
in home economics education courses in the Maryland colleges for 
white students is low, many of the replacements and additional 
teachers have come from out-of -State. 

Considerable time during this year was given to planning for the 
home economics departments in the new school building program. 
In this connection, available equipment was checked and new trends 
studied. The county superintendents have shown much interest in 
making ample provision for the program of home economics and for 
separate cafeterias in the new schools. 

During this year the State Supervisor of Home Economics 
acted as State adviser for the New Homemakers of America (for 
colored girls). Each of the three regional N.H.A. organizations held 
a meeting in the fall of 1947. A State meeting was held in Annapolis 
in May, 1948. Every high school offering home economics has an 
N.H.A. chapter and all chapters were represented at the State meet- 
ing. In June, 1948, Maryland New Homemakers of American enter- 
tained the Second National Convention of this organization at 
Morgan College in Baltimore. The preparation for this convention 
was an excellent experience for the State chapters and advisers. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



As a follow-up of the Family Life Workshop conducted at the 
University of Maryland in July, 1947, three conferences were held 
during the year with a group of county supervisors and teachers. 
Under the leadership of Dr. Muriel W. Brown, progress was made 
in adapting the findings in the workshop to methods of teaching, 
organization, and curriculum materials in the home economics pro- 
gram. 

Industrial Education 

Activity on the State and local level in Industrial Education 
was directed toward the improvement of instruction, the improve- 
ment and expansion of present facilities, the layout of new shops 
and buildings, and the writing of specifications for construction 
and purchase of equipment. 

Group projects worked by the Supervisor of Industrial Educa- 
tion and his associates included: (1) An analysis of the supervisor's 
job, (2) The Maryland Plan for Related Instruction for Appren- 
tices, (3) Courses of Study Outlines for Related Courses, (4) Sug- 
gestive Vocational Shops, (5) General Considerations in Planning 
School Shops, (6) The Maryland Plan for Diversified Occupations 
Training. 

The trade and industrial program in Maryland schools showed 
improvement in the instructional program and in the physical plant 
facilities. Instructional improvement resulted from improved super- 
visory activities, the new salary schedule for teachers, improved 
facilities and equipment, better selection of instructors, and teacher 
upgrading activities that were made available. 

The Glen Burnie Vocational School is an outstanding example 
of things to come in physical plant facilities. The first major structure 
since the war, it is designed and erected to house a program of voca- 
tional industrial needs consistent with community needs. This 
school provides for training in metal and wood industries, automotive 
and electrical trades, plumbing and metal fittings, aircraft trades and 
drafting. The building is used for both day and evening programs. 

During 1947-48, a total of 230 evening trade extension classes 
were conducted throughout the State. The wide variety of offerings 
in these classes was planned to meet the community needs of trade 
and industrial workers. In centers of population, classes were organ- 
ized homogeneously by trades. In the counties classes were formed 
from apprentices representing many trades. Whenever possible, 
the classes were made up of apprentices representing a family of 
trades. 

The School Lunch Program 

The school lunch program in Maryland public schools is main- 
tained either through independent local effort or through Federal 
assistance. Participation by any school in the Federal program is 
voluntary. It is based upon the school's need for help in providing a 
good lunch program for the children it serves. 



34 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



The Federal School Lunch Act passed in June 1946 requires 
that the state departments of education administer the funds and 
supervise the school lunch programs. Most schools which participate 
in the national lunch program serve Type A lunch which is a com- 
plete meal, including milk, and /or the Type C lunch which is milk 
only. 

Federal funds available for the school lunch program totaled 
$613,727 in 1946-47 and $585,183 in 1947-48. The State distributes 
to the participating schools the Federal money which is provided 
each year. This is distributed on the basis of the number of children 
participating. The average daily participation in 1946-47 was 63,925 
and in 1947-48 was 75,862. Because of the decrease in Federal funds 
and the increased participation the average annual amount dropped 
for the same two year period from $9.60 to $7.71 per child and the 
average contribution per lunch from 5.33 cents in 1946-47 to 4.28 
cents in 1947-48. 

The planning and administration of the school lunch program 
is largely the responsibility of the local units. The State provides 
two supervisors who give direction and assistance in establishing 
and maintaining the same standards of food service, sanitation, record 
keeping, and supervision. 



Veterans training programs were set up after the war in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Public Law 346 (G. I. Bill of Rights, later 
amended) and Public Law 377. The first of these two laws provided 
for the training of veterans in occupations which require two years 
or less of training and in apprenticeships requiring more than two 
years because of the skills involved. The second law provided for 
training veterans on-the-farm. In Maryland the Governor designated 
the State Department of Education as the approving agency for 
firms and persons desiring to set up on-the-job and on-the-farm 
training programs. 

In 1947-48 the Veterans Administration requested that the 
State Department of Education provide related instruction for all 
veterans receiving apprentice training, the Veterans Administration 
reimbursing the State for all expenses involved. One hundred 
forty-four clock hours were required for each year of apprenticeship. 
During the year 1947-48, sixty-seven apprentice related instruction 
classes were conducted for veterans training. Thirty-six classes were 
organized in Baltimore City and thirty-one classes in the counties. 
Approximately 1,000 veterans were enrolled in these classes. 

Since the passage of Public Law 346, the number of veterans 
receiving training in Maryland on-the-job (occupations requiring two 
years or less of training) and in apprenticeships (occupations re- 
quiring more than two years of training) was as follows: 



Veterans Training Programs 



Veterans training under 



Year ending June 30 



provisions of Public Law 346 



1946 
1947 
1948 



7,355 
11,191 
6,954 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



These figures do not include disabled veterans in training under 
the Provisions of Public Law 16. This law, administered directly by 
the Veterans Administration, had the following number of veterans 
in training under its provisions: 

Veterans training under 
Year ending June 30 provision of Public Law 16 

1946 943 

1947 1,736 

1948 1,369 

During 1947-48 approximately 5,000 individuals and firms were 
approved for training veterans on-the-job and in apprenticeships. 

The on-the-farm program, which got under way in September 

1946, had 330 veterans in training during the year ending June 30, 

1947. For the year ending June 30, 1948, the number had increased 
to 733. The County Boards of Education in cooperation with the 
State Department of Education provided related instruction through 
local school facilities for on-the-farm training programs. Instruction 
was provided by regular vocational agriculture teachers and special 
teachers employed for this program. 

Thus these programs providing for training veterans on-the- 
job, in apprenticeships, and on-the-farm were vital links in the read- 
justment of veterans of World War II. 

Surplus Property 

During the year 1947-48, the State Department of Education 
undertook the responsibility for screening and securing surplus mater- 
ials which were made available by the government to the schools. 
This plan replaced the one in which individual schools attempted to 
locate and obtain the material. 

Mr. James L. Reid, appointed in May, 1947, to supervise this 
program, was joined in November, 1947, by Mr. William O'Dell 
and Mr. Edward B. Dexter. These men were constantly locating 
and securing at various depots and inquiry headquarters, desirable 
property which could be used in the public and private schools of 
the State. 

An attempt was made to see that all eligible schools in the State 
both public and private, on the elementary, secondary, and college 
levels, were given the opportunity to share in the distribution of 
surplus materials. This included state owned institutions, such as 
Cheltenham, Maryland School for the Deaf, and others, as well as 
the Teachers Colleges and the University of Maryland. 



36 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Rehabilitation Program in Sanatoria 

Highlighting the program of the year, 1947-48, in the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation was the rehabilitation work in the 
State sanatoria. One counselor who had shown particular interest 
in this type of disability was given special training and assigned 
full time to the tuberculous, with financial aid made available from 
the Maryland Tuberculosis Association. The special counselor, 
after studying the work in the sanatoria in several states, used the 
best practices observed and developed an over-all program for 
Maryland. 

A complete home economics unit was installed at Sabillasville, 
and a qualified teacher was supplied by the Frederick County Board 
of Education. Educational and vocational counseling services were 
established for numerous patients who were physically able to profit, 
and a bedside teaching program was begun for the patients who were 
still undergoing treatment. 

Continuation of the programs at Mount Wilson and Henryton, 
as initiated several years before, consisted of a commercial course 
at the former and a sewing course at the latter. Counseling and test- 
ing services were available for ambulatory patients. 

General Activities 

The Division engaged in three major publicity activities in 
awakening the disabled to availability of services for them, and em- 
ployers to the need for hiring the handicapped. 

The film COMEBACK, a moving picture story in sound and 
color, about physically impaired men and women performing actual 
jobs in industry and business after being trained and placed by 
vocational rehabilitation, was shown to 5,952 persons in 86 different 
groups in Maryland. "David Felton, Counselor," a series of thirteen 
15-minute transcriptions, was broadcast over seven radio stations 
located throughout the State. The promotion of "National Employ 
the Physically Handicapped Week," promoted cooperatively with 
the Maryland State Employment Service and various other agencies 
working with the disabled, had as its primary purpose: creating 
employer consciousness to hire the handicapped. NEPH Week, 
occurring in October of each year, is observed throughout the State 
by means of newspaper and radio publicity and window displays. 

Action on Case Load 

Of the 4,287 disabled persons on the live roll, 2,309 were on the 
rolls at the beginning of the year and the other 1,978 were new cases. 
During the year, 3,053 persons actually received service. The "new" 
cases were reported by 33 different agencies from all 23 counties 
and Baltimore City; public schools led the list with 317, while 
hospitals and clinics came next with 206. While rehabilitation funds 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



were used to purchase 2,215 services, at least 1,500 additional services 
were rendered with funds contributed by other agencies or by the 
disabled clients themselves, or their families, but secured through the 
efforts of the counselors. 

A total of 602 persons were rehabilitated — 331 in Baltimore 
City and 271 in the counties. Among the group were 43 blind persons. 
These 602 rehabilitated persons are now supporting with their earn- 
ings, at the rate of $1,024,400.00 a year, not only themselves but, in 
addition, 717 dependents. 

Expenditures 

Expenditures for the year, amounting to $276,208.95, were 
appropriations of $195,298.53 from Federal funds and $80,910.42 
from State funds. These funds were expended as follows : Administra- 
tion (Federal), $19,792.64; Guidance and Supervision (Federal), 
$125,254.91; Case Services (State and Federal), $130,642.13; Sup- 
plies (State, non-matching), $519.27. 



38 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 1— Enrollment, Teaching Staff, and Number of Schools, Public and Non-Public bj 
Color: State of Maryland, Baltimore City, and Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


ENROLLMENT 


Public and Non-Public 




















State 


374,754 


303,378 


71,376 


260,588 


206,693 


53,895 


114,166 


96,685 


17,481 


City 


154,450 


114,688 


39,762 


111,486 


80,947 


30,539 


42,964 


33,741 


9,223 


Countiest 


220,304 


188,690 


31,614 


149,102 


125,746 


23,356 


71,202 


62,944 


8,258 


Public 




















State 


*309,512 


240,717 


68,795 


*207,868 


156,329 


51,539 


*101,644 


84,388 


17,256 


City 


*115,725 


77,702 


38,023 


*80,069 


51,073 


28,996 


*35,656 


26,629 


9,027 


Countiest 


*193,787 


163,015 


30,772 


*127,799 


105,256 


22,543 


*65,988 


57,759 


8,229 


Non-Public 




















State 


65,242 


62,661 


2,581 


52,720 


50,364 


2,356 


12,522 


12,297 


225 


City 


38,725 


36,986 


1,739 


31,417 


29,874 


1,543 


7,308 


7,112 


196 


Counties 


26,517 


25,675 


842 


21,303 


20,490 


813 


5,214 


5,185 


29 



TEACHING STAFF 



Public and Non-Public 




















State 


12,939 


10,781 


2,158 














City 


5,131 


3,951 


1,180 














Countiest 


7,808 


6,830 


978 














Public 




















State 


10,160 


8,079 


2,081 


5,726 


4,339 


1,387 


4,434 


3,740 


694 


City 


3,693 


2,563 


1,130 


2,135 


1,361 


774 


1,558 


1,202 


356 


Countiest 


6,467 


5,516 


951 


3,591 


2,978 


613 


2,876 


2,538 


338 


Non-Public 




















State 


2,797 


2,702 


95 














City 


1,456 


1,388 


68 














Counties 


1,341 


1,314 


27 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Non-Public 




















State 


*1,316 


*972 


*344 


1,190 


866 


324 


303 


256 


47 




*271 


*204 


*67 


237 


177 


60 


55 


45 


10 


Countiest 


*1,045 


*768 


*277 


953 


689 


264 


248 


211 


37 


Public 




















State 


*982 


*661 


*321 


879 


577 


302 


228 


185 


43 


City 


*151 


*98 


*53 


122 


76 


46 


33 


26 


7 


Countiest 


*831 


*563 


*268 


757 


501 


256 


195 


159 


86 


Non-Public 




















State 


*334 


*311 


*23 


311 


289 


22 


75 


71 


4 


City 


*120 


*106 


*14 


115 


101 


14 


22 


19 


3 




*214 


*205 


*9 


196 


188 


8 


53 


52 


1 



For basic data on these subjects, see TABLES I, II, III, IV, V, and X. 

* Excludes duplicates. t Excludes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State 
Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



TABLE 2— Opening and Closing Dates, Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1947 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools in 
1948 



County 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools in 
September, 
1947 



Baltimore City 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 



3 


June 


18 


4 


June 


16 


4 


June 


11 


8 


June 


18 


4 


June 


8 


3 


May 


31 


3 


June 


11 


3 


June 


11 


8 


June 


11 


8 


June 


11 


3 


June 


9 


2 


June 


11 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



8 


June 


11 


8 


June 


18 


3 


June 


10 


10 


June 


18 


10 


June 


17 


3 


June 


3 


8 


June 


18 


2 


June 


2 


8 


June 


4 


3 


June 


11 


3 


June 


4 


3 


June 


4 



TABLE 3— Number of County Schools in Session Fewer Than 180 Days, Year 

Ending June 30, 1948 



Year or County 


Total Number 


Number Having 
One Teacher 


Number Larger 
Elementary Schools 


white SCHOOLS 


1947 


22 


11 


11 


1948 


4 


3 


1 


Frederick 


1 


al 




Garrett 


1 


61 




Montgomery 


1 


ci 


Prince George's 


1 


di 








COLORED SCHOOLS 


1947 


3 


1 


2 


1948 


2 




2 


Talbot 


2 




e2 









a 176 days. 

b 161 days, due to difficulty in obtaining teacher. 

c 178 days, due to late opening of new school building. 

d 174 days. 

e 179 days each. 



40 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 1 



Total White and Colored Enrollment in Public Schools: Counties of Maryland 
and Baltimore City: 1923-1948 



160 



9 80 
a 

% 



60 



Baltimore City 



Dibit e 



Counties - Colored 



Baltimore 



1923 '25 127 '29 »31 '53 »35 '37 '39 '41 '43 '45 '47 

Tear 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



TABLE 4 — Enrollment in Public and Non-Public Schools by Color: Counties of 
Maryland and Baltimore City: 1939-1948 



Year 

Ending 


Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Non-Public Schools 


















June 30 


Countie8*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



White Enrollment 



1939 


161,633 


126,660 


146,216 


89,860 


11,845 


33,700 


3,572 


3,100 


1940 


162,992 


124,040 


147,646 


88,317 


11,911 


32,788 


3,435 


2,935 


1941 


166,058 


122,185 


1 149,969 


87,291 


12,578 


31,753 


3,511 


3,141 


1942 


169,579 


119,651 


152,449 


85,039 


13,319 


31,122 


3,811 


3,490 


1943 


172,317 


118,800 


154,701 


84,389 


13,770 


30,809 


3,846 


3,602 


1944 


171,917 


117,414 


153,158 


82,709 


14,721 


31,097 


4,038 


3,608 


1945 


174,113 


115,289 


154,502 


79,552 


15,192 


31,783 


4,419 


3,954 


1946 


177,016 


113,021 


155,873 


77,086 


16,221 


31,571 


4,922 


4,364 


1947 


181,278 


112,648 


157,992 


76,471 


17,069 


31,608 


6,217 


4,569 


1948 


189,224 


114,688 


163,549 


77,702 


18,584 


31,935 


7,091 


5,051 



Colored Enrollment 



1939 


29,171 


33,668 


28,619 


32,088 


529 


1,473 


23 


107 


1940 


29,146 


34,026 


28,627 


32,441 


519 


1,490 




95 


1941 


29,282 


34,703 


28,720 


33,169 


562 


1,447 




87 


1942 


28,965 


34,487 


28,356 


33,047 


609 


1,377 




63 


1943 


28,769 


34,318 


28,137 


32,840 


632 


1,407 




71 


1944 


28,555 


34,804 


27,928 


33,189 


627 


1,539 




76 


1945 


29,061 


35,747 


28,431 


34,269 


630 


1,403 




75 


1946 


29,824 


37,034 


29,166 


35,465 


658 


1,476 




93 


1947 


30,882 


38,295 


30,032 


36,678 


750 


1,518 


ioo 


99 


1948 


31,717 


39,762 


30,875 


38,023 


783 


1,558 


59 


181 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 



42 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 5 — Enrollment in Public and Non-Public Schools by Color — Type of School: 
Counties of Maryland and Baltimore City : 1939-1948 



Year 
Ending 
June 30 


Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Non-Public Schools 


Counties*t 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties*! 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



White Elementary School Enrollment 



1939 


121,137 


100,250 


109,579 


68,863 


9,823 


29,090 


1,735 


2,297 


1940 


120,719 


96,947 


109,154 


66,896 


9,828 


27,947 


1,737 


2,104 


1941 


121,933 


95,401 


110,021 


65,732 


10,082 


27,371 


1,830 


2,298 


1942 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65,123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94,780 


115,253 


65,904 


11,059 


26,104 


2,124 


2,772 


1944 


128,328 


94,497 


115,586 


65,708 


11,797 


26,010 


2,445 


2,779 


1945 


131,549 


92,309 


116,611 


62,969 


12,162 


26,322 


2,776 


3,018 


1946 


118,579 


79,779 


102,148 


50,482 


13,187 


25,883 


3,244 


3,414 


1947 


119,936 


79,355 


101,784 


49,707 


13,888 


26,214 


4,099 


3,537 


1948 


126,280 


80,947 


105,790 


51,073 


15,290 


26,000 


5,200 


3,874 



White High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1939 


40,496 


26,410 


36,637 


20,997 


2,022 


4,610 


m 

1,837 


803 


1940 


42,273 


27,093 


38,492 


21,421 


2,083 


4,841 


1,698 


831 


1941 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


39,448 


18,485 


2,711 


4,705 


1,722 


830 


1944 


42,089 


22,917 


37,572 


17,001 


2,924 


5,087 


1,593 


829 


1945 


42,564 


22,980 


37,891 


16,583 


3,030 


5,461 


1,643 


936 


1946 


58,437 


33,242 


53,725 


26,604 


3,034 


5,688 


1,678 


950 


1947 


61,507 


33,190 


56,208 


26,764 


3,181 


5,394 


2,118 


1,032 


1948 


62,944 


33,741 


57,759 


26,629 


3,294 


5,935 


1,891 


1,177 



Colored Elementary School Enrollment 



1939 


24,604 


29,830 


24,052 


28,374 


529 


1,367 


23 


89 


1940 


24,328 


29,877 


23,809 


28,408 


519 


1,393 




76 


1941 


24,114 


30,515 


23,552 


29,112 


562 


1,335 




68 


1942 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


29,247 


609 


1,249 




50 


1943 


23,505 


30,553 


22,873 


29,245 


632 


1,253 




55 


1944 


23,337 


31,254 


22,736 


29,857 


601 


1,334 




63 


1945 


23,825 


31,753 


23,195 


30,503 


630 


1,179 




71 


1946 


22,824 


29,044 


22,166 


27,686 


658 


1,270 




88 


1947 


23,082 


29,448 


22,297 


28,018 


750 


1,334 


ioo 


96 


1948 


23,459 


30,539 


22,646 


28,996 


754 


1,375 


59 


168 



Colored High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1939 


4,567 


3,838 


4,567 


3,714 




106 




18 


1940 


4,818 


4,149 


4,818 


4,033 




97 




19 


1941 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 




112 




19 


1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 




128 




13 


1943 


5,264 


3,765 


5,264 


3,595 




154 




16 


1944 


5,218 


3,550 


5,192 


3,332 


26 


205 




13 


1945 


5,236 


3,994 


5,236 


3,766 




224 




4 


1946 


7,000 


7,990 


7,000 


7,779 




206 




5 


1947 


7,738 


8,847 


7,738 


8,660 




184 




3 


1948 


8,258 


9,223 


8,229 


9,027 


'29 


183 




13 



* Includes enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates between counties in public schools. 

For public and non-public school enrollment in detail see TABLES II, III, IV, and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



TABLE 6— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1935, 1940-1948 



Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



— ■ 


WHITE 


County 


1 QQ^ 




1 CM 1 

iy 4 1 




1 QA1 


1 CM A 


1 CM 


1 CM ft 


1 CM 7 


1 Q 4 Q 


State of Maryland 


22,112 


25,438 


29,521 


35,911 


38,749 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


Baltimore City .... 


9,363 


10,105 


11,886 


15,076 


16,077 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


Total Counties .... 


12,749 


15,333 


17,635 


20,835 


22,672 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


Allegany 


1,606 


1,719 


1,821 


1,871 


1,887 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


Anne Arundel . . . 
Baltimore 


746 
1,938 


846 
2,672 


1,080 
3,275 


1,360 
4,501 


1,487 
5,155 


1,442 
4,862 


1,392 
4,751 


1,693 
5,643 


1,943 
6,328 


2,020 
5,737 


Calvert 


103 


119 


112 


115 


147 


116 


156 


137 


156 


179 


Caroline 


267 


245 


274 


250 


283 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


Carroll 


536 


596 


610 


686 


716 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


Cecil 


417 


421 


528 


521 


698 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


Charles 


201 


210 


270 


343 


382 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


285 
874 


297 
889 


299 
972 


327 
1,009 


318 
1,067 


318 
979 


298 
1,029 


360 
1,254 


412 
1,338 


368 
1,196 


Garrett 


517 


530 


531 


490 


504 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


Harford 


486 


570 


662 


1,042 


1,081 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


Howard 


252 


306 


325 


346 


383 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


Kent 


124 


166 


156 


155 


156 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


Montgomery . . . 


902 


1,568 


1,981 


2,443 


2,543 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne'B . . . 
St. Mary's 


1,030 
149 
245 


1,429 
155 
244 


1,851 
166 

225 


2,276 
164 
282 


2,672 
177 
336 


2,532 
170 
388 


2,529 
178 
540 


3,273 
196 
475 


3,448 
208 
557 


3,605 
213 
564 


Somerset 


217 


230 


219 


218 


217 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


Talbot 


173 


216 


207 


196 


216 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


Washington 

Wicomico 


1,185 
318 
178 


1,234 
460 
211 


1,378 
452 
241 


1,523 
482 
235 


1,530 
492 
225 


1,479 
501 
246 


1,451 
471 
231 


1,702 
571 
306 


1,950 
684 
375 


1,761 
663 
326 

















44 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 7— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1935, 1940-1948 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



COLORED 



County 


1935 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


State of Maryland . 


6,031 


6,930 


7,605 


8,243 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


Baltimore City .... 


2,969 


3,607 


4,109 


4,644 


4,977 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


Total Counties .... 


3,062 


3,323 


3,496 


3,599 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


Allegany 


19 


32 


32 


41 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


Anne Arundel . . . 


353 


423 


440 


471 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


Baltimore 


221 


232 


234 


248 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


Calvert 


131 


137 


136 


143 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


Caroline 


80 


91 


91 


98 


98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


Carroll 


35 


45 


40 


64 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


Cecil 


62 


46 


54 


49 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


Charles 


232 


254 


278 


273 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


Dorchester 


153 


184 


171 


187 


173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


Frederick 


95 


115 


137 


115 


116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


Garrett 


















3 


1 


Harford 


82 


88 


86 


98 


87 


112 


96 


112 


141 


167 


Howard 


77 


74 


81 


68 


87 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


Kent 


89 


94 


87 


96 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


Montgomery . . . 


178 


202 


237 


223 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


384 


425 


474 


482 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


83 


88 


88 


92 


71 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


St. Mary's 


140 


149 


151 


172 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


Somerset 


190 


169 


183 


144 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


Talbot 


125 


126 


125 


148 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


Washington .... 


23 


37 


31 


39 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


Wicomico 


149 


151 


183 


175 


161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


Worcester 


161 


161 


157 


173 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



TABLE 8 — Per Cent of Attendance in White and Colored Elementary Schools for 
Years Ending June, 1947 and 1948 



County 


White Schools 


Colored 


Schools 
















1947 


1948 


1947 




„ A 


*91 


.1 


*90.8 


*88 


8 


*88 7 


Baltimore City 


89 


6 


88.2 


88 


5 


88.3 


County Average 


*91 


8 


*92.0 


*89 


1 


♦89.2 




*92 


9 


*93.7 


92 


8 


88.0 




90 


7 


89.7 


*89 


5 


♦89.0 


Baltimore 


*92 





*91.5 


88 


7 


88.4 


Calvert 


91 


6 


90.1 


85 


3 


81.4 




93 


3 


93.9 


92 





91.0 


Carroll 


92 


1 


92.3 


87 


4 


83.9 


Cecil 


89 


8 


91.7 


86 


8 


87.6 




91 


3 


91.1 


84 


5 


86.0 


Dorchester 


93 


5 


94.4 


91 


6 


91.2 




91 


7 


93.2 


86 


7 


88.8 


Garrett 


89 


8 


91.8 








Harford 


90 


3 


92.2 


88 


8 


9^2 


Howard 


89 


9 


91.9 


84 


9 


87.5 


Kent 


93 


9 


93.6 


91 


7 


92.6 




90 


5 


90.1 


89 


3 


88.2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


93 





92.6 


*90 


9 


*90.9 


92 


4 


91.6 


95 


8 


94.7 




90 


6 


90.4 


85 


7 


86.2 


Somerset 


92 


9 


93.4 


89 


5 


90.4 


Talbot 


93 


6 


91.7 


93 


7 


93.3 




92 


5 


92.9 


89 


7 


91.0 


Wicomico 


*92 


7 


♦93.4 


91 


7 


92.2 


Worcester 


91 


8 


92.7 


84 


4 


87.4 



For attendance in 1948 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 

* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges: 



Frostburg 94.6 95.3 

Salisbury 93 . 2 94 . 

Towson 92 7 93 3 

Bowie: 91.2 90.3 

Anne Arundel 87.6 87.7 

Prince George's 92.6 91.4 



46 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 9 



Per Cent of Attendance for School Years Ending in June 1947 and 1948 by Type of 

White Elementary School 



*** ■ — ^ 

County 


Schools Having One- 
Teacher 
Organization 


Schools Having Two- 
Teacher 
Organization 


Schools 
Having 
Three- 
Teacher 
Organiza- 
tion 


Graded Schools 




1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


1948 


1947f 


1948 


County Average .... 


91 


1 


92 


4 


91 


6 


92 


5 


92 





*91 


9 


*92 





Allegany 


93 


9 


95 


1 


93 


4 


95 


3 


96 


6 


*92 


9 


*93 


5 


Anne Arundel .... 










92 


6 


90 


1 


90 


3 


90 


6 


89 


6 


Baltimore 










88 


6 


88 


2 


90 


3 


*92 





♦91 


6 


Calvert 










95 


4 


94 


4 


89 


7 


91 





89 


4 


Caroline 










92 


1 


91 


8 






93 


5 


94 


1 


Carroll 










91 


7 


92 


7 






92 


1 


92 


8 


Cecil 


92 


7 


93 


9 


88 


5 


92 









89 


7 


91 


6 


Charles 










89 


8 


94 


4 






91 


3 


91 


1 


Dorchester 


93 


8 


94 


8 


92 


7 


93 


8 






93 


7 


94 


5 


Frederick 


95 


2 


94 


6 


91 


8 


92 





90 


5 


91 


7 


93 


4 


Garrett 


87 


6 


90 


7 


89 


6 


91 


2 


94 


3 


90 


5 


92 





Harford 


91 


7 


92 


6 


93 


1 


94 


6 


92 


3 


90 





92 





Howard 


88 


2 


87 


8 


75 


1 


92 


1 






90 


1 


92 





Kent 


93 


5 


94 


9 


93 


4 


91 


6 


90 


8 


94 


1 


94 


6 


Montgomery 


90 


8 


88 


9 


91 


1 


91 


6 


90 


2 


90 


5 


90 





Prince George's . . . 


92 


3 


91 


4 


90 


7 


92 


5 


94 


3 


93 


1 


92 


6 


Queen Anne's 


92 


3 


91 


9 


94 


4 


91 


3 


92 


5 


92 


5 


91 


4 


St. Mary's 


91 





89 


3 


90 


8 


90 


8 






90 


3 


90 


4 


Somerset 


95 


4 


94 


2 


92 


1 


91 


4 






92 


8 


93 


5 


Talbot 


92 


9 


92 





94 


5 


91 


1 


9i 


7 


93 


5 


91 


8 


Washington 


93 


5 


95 


1 


91 


9 


93 


9 


92 


1 


92 


5 


92 


8 


Wicomico 


92 


8 


95 


5 


93 


5 


94 


9 


94 





*92 


7 


*93 


2 


Worcester 










91 


2 


94 





93 


6 


91 


9 


92 


3 



* Excludes attendance in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t In 1947 three-teacher organization included with Graded Schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



TABLE 10 — An Index of School Attendance in County Elementary Schools* White 
and Colored, for School Year Ending June 30, 1948 







White Schools 




Colored 


Schools 






Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


County 




Attendance 


Late 


With- 


Attendance 


Late 


With- 






t 




EntrantsJ 


drawals 


t 




Entrants^ 


drawals 


County Average 




92 








3 





7 


89 


2 


1 


5 


0.9 


Allegany 




93 


7 





2 





4 


94 


6 


i 




0.6 


Anne Arundel .... 




89 


7 





5 





5 


89 





9 


0.9 






91 


5 





2 





5 


88 


4 





5 


0.7 


Calvert 




90 


1 


1 


6 





7 


81 


4 


4 


7 


0.7 


Caroline 




93 


9 





2 





6 


91 





1 


8 


0.3 


Carroll 




92 


3 





2 





4 


83 


9 


1 


1 


1.5 


Cecil 




91 


7 





4 





7 


87 


6 





7 


0.3 


Charles 




91 


1 





3 


1 


2 


86 





4 


2 


1.0 


Dorchester 




94 


4 





3 





6 


91 


2 


1 


2 


0.4 


Frederick 




93 


2 





1 





7 


88 


8 






0.3 






91 


8 









6 
















92 


2 


i 


9 


1 





9i 


2 


6 


4 


0^3 


Howard 




91 


9 





1 





8 


87 


5 


i 





1.9 


Kent 




93 


6 





5 


1 


1 


92 


6 


l 


1 


0.4 


Montgomery 




90 


1 





4 


1 


1 


88 


2 


i 


3 


0.9 


Prince George's . 




92 


6 





2 





3 


90 


9 





4 


1.2 






91 


6 





1 





2 


94 


7 








St. Mary'B 




90 


4 


1 


1 





8 


86 


2 


5 


2 


1.9 


Somerset 




93 


4 





1 





8 


90 


4 





9 


1.1 


Talbot 




91 


7 





2 





9 


93 


3 


3 


7 


1.0 


Washington 




92 


9 





2 





8 


91 





1 


7 




Wicomico 




93 


4 





1 


1 


2 


92 


2 





3 


i'.a 






92 


7 





2 


3 





87 


4 


1 





0.6 



* Excludes elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t For per cent of attendance for all types of schools, see TABLE IX. 

% Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. 

° Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, commitment to institutions, or death. 



48 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 11— Per Cent of Attendance in White and Colored High Schools for Years 
Ending June, 1947 and 1948 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


State Average* 


92 


5 


92 


5 


91 





91,4 


Baltimore City* 


92 


5 


92 


2 


91 





91.1 


County Average 


92 


5 


92 


6 


90 


8 


90.9 


Allegany 


93 


5 


94 


6 


95 


3 


95.0 


Anne Arundel 


91 


4 


91 


4 


89 


3 


87.6 


Baltimore 


92 


8 


92 


3 


91 


9 


92.7 


Calvert 


92 


3 


92 


3 


91 


3 


89.2 


Caroline 


93 


4 


93 


9 


88 


2 


90.2 


Carroll 


93 


3 


93 


7 


90 





90.4 


Cecil 


90 


6 


91 


2 


89 


3 


87.5 


Charles 


92 


1 


92 


1 


90 





90.3 


Dorchester 


93 


2 


93 


7 


93 





91.0 


Frederick 


93 


2 


92 


9 


92 





94.2 


flnrrof t 


90 


1 


91 


2 








Harford 


92 


4 


92 


9 


9i 


8 


92.3 




92 


8 


92 


7 


89 


5 


91.6 


Kent 


92 


2 


92 


6 


94 


6 


94.6 




92 


4 


92 





88 


3 


87.8 


Prince George's 


92 


7 


92 


3 


91 


1 


91.0 




92 





92 


4 


91 


3 


91.9 




90 


9 


90 


1 


87 


5 


87.4 


Somerset 


94 


3 


95 





92 


6 


93.6 


Talbot 


92 


2 


91 


8 


93 


1 


92.1 


Washington 


91 


1 


91 


8 


92 


3 


91.9 


"Wicomico 


94 


6 


95 


2 


92 


1 


93.2 


Worcester 


93 





93 


6 


89 


2 


90.9 



* Includes pupils in vocational schools. 

For attendance in 1948 by type of organization, see TABLE IX. 



TABLE 12 — Number of Boys and Girls Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland County 
Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Grade 


White and Colored 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


187,915 


95,314 


92,601 


157,781 


80,370 


77,411 


30,134 


14,944 


15,190 


Kindergarten . . 


1,776 


948 


828 


1,776 


948 


828 








1* 


23,179 


12,081 


11,098 


18,925 


9,851 


9,074 


4,254 


2,230 


2,024 


2 


20,778 


10,915 


9,863 


16,962 


8,872 


8,090 


3,816 


2,043 


1,773 


3 


19,288 


9,962 


9,326 


15,786 


8,205 


7,581 


3,502 


1,757 


1,745 


4 


19,557 


10,090 


9,467 


16,066 


8,322 


7,744 


3,491 


1,768 


1,723 




18,098 


9,321 


8,777 


15,112 


7,824 


7,288 


2,986 


1,497 


1,489 


6 


17,251 


8,974 


8,277 


14,406 


7,527 


6,879 


2,845 


1,447 


1,398 




16,279 


8,217 


8,062 


13,626 


6,961 


6,665 


2,653 


1,256 


1,397 


3::::::::::: 


14,758 


7,428 


7,330 


12,630 


6,395 


6,235 


2,128 


1,033 


1,095 


9/1 


12,789 


6,052 


6,737 


10,960 


5,261 


5,699 


1,829 


791 


1,038 


10/11 


6,210 


3,026 


3,184 


5,571 


2,763 


2,808 


639 


263 


376 


11 /III 


8,165 


3,742 


4,423 


7,166 


3,313 


3,853 


999 


429 


570 


12/IVJ 


8,904 


3,964 


4,940 


7,934 


3,549 


4,385 


970 


415 


555 


Special Classes. . 


883 


594 


289 


861 


579 


282 


22 


15 


7 



Enrollment excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution; also 
enrollment in elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
* Includes enrollment in junior first grade, 
t Includes enrollment in elementary and junior high schools. 

X Includes 22 white boys, 15 white girls, and 1 colored boy who were post-graduates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



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Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



TABLE 15 — Number and Per Cent of Non-Promotions in First Grade* in Maryland 
County White and Colored Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


White Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 


Colored Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties: 


























1947 


649 


401 


6 


9 


4 


7 


425 


244 


18 


2 


12 


3 


1948 


662 


392 


6 


7 


4 


3 


375 


246 


16 


8 


12 


2 


Allegany 


44 


19 


5 





2 


7 














Anne Arundel 


93 


60 


12 


5 


8 


6 


63 


36 


22 


5 


14 


5 


Baltimore 


68 


37 


3 


8 


2 


3 


39 


34 


13 


3 


15 


1 


Calvert 


13 


9 


19 


4 


12 


3 


40 


28 


36 


7 


31 


8 


Caroline 


13 


13 


10 


4 


8 


6 


7 


8 


12 


7 


16 


3 


Carroll 


31 


17 


8 


7 


4 


8 


5 


4 


22 


7 


18 


2 


Cecil 


11 


2 


3 


8 





8 


5 


2 


15 


6 


6 


9 


Charles 


12 


9 


8 


5 


6 


4 


38 


17 


21 


8 


11 


8 


Dorchester 


16 


10 


9 


7 


6 


5 


18 


4 


19 


1 


5 


4 


Frederick 


20 


13 


4 


4 


2 


8 


2 


2 


3 


9 


3 


3 


Garrett 


23 


12 


6 


6 


3 


7 














Harford 


53 


36 


13 


1 


8 


8 


9 


2 


13 


2 


3 


2 


Howard 


17 


11 


7 


7 


5 


9 


6 


5 


9 


4 


8 


5 


Kent 


6 


7 


6 


3 


8 


3 


2 




4 


9 






Montgomery 


89 


51 


8 


4 


5 


4 


26 


29 


19 


3 


19 


2 


Prince George's 


80 


45 


6 


9 


4 





49 


34 


17 


4 


12 





Queen Anne's 


2 


3 


1 


7 


3 

















St. Mary's 


7 


3 


7 


9 


4 





is 


is 


24 


6 


21 


7 


Somerset 


1 







9 






10 


4 


8 


9 


4 


9 


Talbot 


18 


io 


13 





9 


3 


19 


16 


27 


1 


23 


5 


Washington 


26 


18 


3 


8 


2 


9 


3 


1 


14 


3 


6 


3 


Wicomico 


17 


6 


6 


5 


2 


6 


8 


2 


8 


4 


1 


9 


Worcester 


2 




1 


3 





7 


8 


3 


9 


5 


3 


4 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, but includes pupils 
in junior first grade. 



52 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 16 — Causes for Non-Promotion of County White Elementary Pupils* Not 
Promoted by Year 1939-1948, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1948 







Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 


Year 
County 


Total 
Not 
Promoted 


All Causes 


Personal Illness 


Irregular Attendance 
Not Due to 
Sickness 


Late Entrance 


14 Years or Over, 
Employed 


Mental Incapacity 


Unfortunate Home 
Conditions and 
Lack of Interest 


Transfer from 
Another School 


Other Causes 



BY YEAR 



1938-39 


11,759 


11 


1 




2 


0.9 


0.2 


0.5 


1 


6 


4 


6 


0.7 


1.4 


1939-40 


11,057 


10 


5 






0.9 


0.2 


0.5 


1 


6 


4 


2 


0.7 


1.3 


1940-41 


10,685 


10 


1 






1.0 


0.2 


0.6 


1 


3 


3 


8 


0.6 


1.5 


1941-42 


10,287 


9 


6 






1.0 


0.2 


0.6 


1 


1 


3 


7 


0.6 


1.3 


1942-43 


11,255 


10 


3 






1.3 


0.2 


0.6 


1 


1 


3 


9 


0.6 


1.5 


1943-44 


10,585 


9 


8 






1.0 


0.2 


0.5 


1 





4 





0.5 


1.5 


1944-45 


8,083 


7 


3 





9 


0.9 


0.1 


0.4 





7 


2 


8 


0.3 


1.2 


1945-46f 


4,852 


5 








6 


0.4 


0.1 


0.2 





5 


1 


9 


0.3 


1.0 


1946-47f 


3,040 


3 


1 





5 


0.2 


0.1 


0.1 





3 


1 


2 


0.2 


0.5 


1947-48f 


3,027 


3 








4 


0.2 


0.1 


t 





4 


1 


2 


0.2 


0.5 



BY COUNTY, 1947-48t 



Allegany 


236 


2 


7 





3 


t 


X 




1.0 





7 


0.1 





6 


Anne Arundel 


401 


5 


4 





6 


0.5 


0.2 


i' 


0.7 


2 


8 


0.2 





4 


Baltimore 


265 


1 


4 





3 


0.1 


t 


0.1 


t 





4 


0.1 





4 


Calvert 


32 


4 


1 





1 


0.4 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 





8 




2 


5 


Caroline 


73 


5 








4 


0.1 


0.1 




0.9 


1 


4 


o'.i 


2 





Carroll 


109 


2 


8 





1 


0.1 


0.1 


o'.i 


0.7 


1 


2 


0.1 





4 


Cecil 


51 


1 


9 





2 


0.4 


0.1 




0.5 





6 


t 





1 


Charles 


53 


3 


6 





4 


0.3 


0.1 


o' i 


0.4 





8 


0.1 


1 


4 


Dorchester 


49 


2 


7 





4 


0.1 






0.1 





9 


0.1 


1 


1 


Frederick 


75 


1 


4 





5 






i" 


t 





7 


t 





1 


Garrett 


125 


3 


7 


1 


1 








0.4 


2 





0.1 





1 


Harford 


190 


4 


7 





7 


o'.i 


o'.i 


0^2 


0.5 


2 


2 


0.4 





5 


Howard 


155 


8 


2 





5 


0.3 


0.4 


t 


1.6 


3 


8 


1.1 





5 


Kent 


26 


2 


7 





4 




0.1 






1 


1 


0.2 





9 


Montgomery 


302 


2 


7 





3 


0.2 


0.1 


X 


0.2 





8 


0.2 





9 


Prince George's 


355 


3 








3 


0.1 


0.1 




0.2 


1 


4 


0.3 





6 


Queen Anne's 


16 


1 


4 





6 








0.1 





2 







5 


St. Mary's 


55 


5 


5 





2 


1.2 


0.9 






2 





0^3 





9 


Somerset 


42 


3 


3 





3 


0.2 






i!a 




1 


0.2 





2 


Talbot 


67 


5 


4 





5 


0.3 


0.2 




0.1 


2 


2 


0.5 


1 


6 


Washington 


109 


1 


4 





3 


0.1 


0.1 


X 


0.1 





3 


0.1 





4 


Wicomico 


175 


6 


1 





6 






0.5 


1.4 


3 


1 


0.2 





3 


Worcester 


66 


4 


4 





5 


0'2 




0.1 


1.5 


1 


8 


0.2 





1 



* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than 0,1 per cent. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



TABLE 17 — Causes for Non-Promotion of County Colored Elementary Pupils* Not 
Promoted by Year 1939-1948, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1948 







Per Cent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 


Year 


Total 










idance 












city 


0J 

l-d 


1 






County 


Not 
Promoted 


CO 


8 
c 


Atter 
e to 


ranee 


> 
c 

u 
o 


-a 

o 


ncapa 


"s 

« 8 


Inter 


from 


o 
a 

u 
r. 


uses 






I 

O 


•sonal 


egular 
ot Du 
ckness 


te Ent 


DO 
a) 

O) 


mploy 


;ntal I 


fortun 


ack of 


insfer 


nother 


OS 

U 

1 






< 




<D 
PL, 










w 






H 




< 


O 


BY YEAR 


1938-39 


4,303 


18 


5 


1 


6 


3 


7 





6 





9 


1.4 


8 


5 





.5 


1.3 


1939-40 


4,832 


16 


6 


1 


5 


3 


2 





6 


1 





0.9 


7 


7 





.8 


0.9 


1940-41 


3,663 


16 


1 


1 


8 


3 








5 


1 





0.9 


7 








.7 


1.2 


1941-42 


3,645 


16 


2 


1 


4 


3 


1 





4 





9 


0.9 


7 


5 





6 


1.4 


1942-43 


3,891 


17 


6 


1 


5 


4 


4 





3 


1 





0.9 


7 


5 





.5 


1.5 


1943-44 


3,788 


17 


2 


1 


7 


4 


2 





5 





8 


0.9 


7 


3 





.7 


1.1 


1944-45 


3,464 


15 


2 


1 


2 


3 


8 





4 





7 


0.8 


6 


8 





6 


0.9 


1945-46f 


2,491 


11 


6 


1 


2 


3 


1 





3 





4 


0.5 


4 


5 






1.0 


1946-47f 


2,043 


9 


4 


1 





2 


3 





3 





3 


0.5 


4 


1 





3 


0.6 


1947-48t 


1,793 


8 


2 





9 


1 


9 





3 





3 


0.4 


3 


6 





2 


0.6 


BY COUNTY, 1947-48t 


Allegany 


1 





7 























7 








Anne Arundel 


258 


8 


9 


1 


3 


2 


.0 





.5 





4 


0^3 


4 


1 





.1 


0.2 


Baltimore 


166 


6 


5 


1 


.0 


2 


1 









1 


t 


1 


8 





A 


1.1 


Calvert 


237 


22 


6 


1 


.1 


9 


.2 





.1 





7 


1.1 


8 


7 





.5 


1.2 


Caroline 


48 


8 


2 


1 


.0 









.2 


1 


9 




3 


7 





2 


1.2 


Carroll 


15 


6 





1 


6 


1 


.2 





.4 








2 


8 








Cecil 


13 


4 


5 













.7 








2 


8 





.3 


0'7 


Charles 


177 


11 


7 





8 


3 


.5 





9 





1 


0^5 


4 


7 





2 


1.0 


Dorchester 


52 


5 


2 





6 





.1 












2 


4 





.2 


1.9 


Frederick 


8 


1 


3 





.7 





.2 









i 


0^2 










0.1 


Garrett 




































Harford 


"25 


3 


8 





1 





5 












2 


3 






0^9 


Howard 


33 


5 


7 





3 





.7 





.9 






0.2 


2 


9 





2 


0.5 


Kent 


23 


5 




















4 




4 


2 






0.4 


Montgomery 


123 


8 


4 


1 


2 


2 


6 





.i 





7 


0.4 


3 








3 


0.1 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


262 


8 


6 


1 


2 


1 


8 





.4 





2 


0.8 


3 


5 





4 


0.3 


3 





7 





7 


























St. Mary's 


95 


14 


4 


1 


2 


2 


.9 





.9 





2 




6 


9 





3 


2.0 


Somerset 


43 


4 


6 





2 


1 


5 





.5 





1 


1.6 


0. 


9 





1 


0.3 


Talbot 


83 


11 


8 


1 




1 


1 





3 








8. 


7 






0.6 


Washington 


6 


3 


6 






1 


2 












1 


2 






1.2 


Wicomico 


57 


5 


3 


1 


3 













2 


0.8 


2 


3 





5 


0.2 


Worcester 


65 


7 


3 


1 








2 





.5 






0.1 


5 


5 









* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

T Prior to 1946 grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were included with elementary school figures. 

X Less than . 1 per cent. 



54 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 18 



Age-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Boys Enrolled November, 1947 





TOTAT. 1 




Elementary Grade* 




High School Year 


AGEf 


All I 
GradesI 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


7 


8/1 


9 /II 


10/ 
III 


11/ 
IV 


12a 



Maryland County White Boys 



5 and underj .... 


2,753 


2,750 


3 


























6° 


8,173 


6,080 


2,089 


4 
























7 


7,679 


827 


5,302 


1,538 


12 






















8 


7,514 


98 


1,258 


4,692 


1,460 


6 




















9 


7,448 


18 


202 


1,536 


4,401 


1,278 


13 


















10 


7,079 


3 


47 


356 


1,707 


3,823 


1,124 






18 


1 










11 


6,959 


1 


8 


85 


547 


1,784 


3,436 


92 




954 


52 










12 


6,891 




3 


13 


139 


743 


1,872 


258 


17 


2,841 


974 


31 








13 


6,204 




1 


3 


34 


183 


788 


150 


51 


1,511 


2,678 


784 


21 






14 


6,108 






1 


5 


32 


214 


81 


37 


773 


1,630 


2,548 


761 


26 




15 


5,262 








1 


5 


39 


23 




230 


709 


1,458 


2,129 


664 


4 


16 


3,727 






i 






2 


3 




19 


143 


470 


1,093 


1,797 


199 


17 


1,826 


















2 


6 


103 


339 


884 


493 


18 


442 






















11 


66 


216 


149 


19 


97 
























15 


60 


32 


Over 19 


70 
























9 


30 


31 


Total number 


78,232 


9,777 


8,913 


8,229 


8,306 


7,854 


7,488 


607 


105 


6,348 


6,192 


5,405 


4,433 


3,667 


908 


Number over-age . . 


6,932 


120 


261 


459 


726 


963 


1,043 


107 




1,024 


857 


584 


429 


296 


63 


Per cent over-age . . 


8.9 


1.2 


2.9 


5.6 


8.7 


12.3 


13.9 


17.6 




16.1 


13.8 


10.8 


9.7 


8.1 


6.9 



Maryland County Colored Boys 





431 


428 


3 


























6 


1,595 


1,283 


312 


























7 


1,652 


410 


1,021 


219 


2 






















8 


1,493 


85 


490 


724 


190 


4 




















9 


1,492 


25 


150 


480 


700 


133 


4 


















10 


1,416 


12 


63 


224 


436 


528 


148 


1 




4 












11 


1,381 


1 


21 


82 


236 


410 


499 


45 




79 


8 










12 


1,385 


2 


9 


29 


133 


224 


411 


178 




253 


137 


9 








13 


1,289 




1 


10 


64 


129 


236 


154 




190 


409 


94 


2 






14 


1,143 






1 


22 


53 


121 


69 




154 


292 


321 


107 


2 


i 


15 


891 








5 


20 


37 


38 




63 


172 


225 


266 


65 




16 


474 


i 








1 


5 


1 




10 


48 


82 


158 


162 


6 


17 


239 












1 






1 


10 


23 


60 


130 


14 


18 


77 






















2 


14 


48 


13 


19 


12 
























4 


7 


1 


Over 19 


9 
























1 


6 


2 




14,979 


2,247 


2,070 


1,769 


1,788 


1,502 


1,462 


486 




754 


1,076 


756 


612 


420 


37 


Number over-age . . 


2,819 


126 


244 


346 


460 


427 


400 


108 




228 


230 


107 


79 


61 


3 


Per cent over-age . . 


18.8 


5.6 


11.8 


19.5 


25.7 


28.4 


27.4 


22.2 




30.2 


21.4 


14.2 


12.9 


14.5 


8.1 



* Excludes pupils in special classes and enrollment m elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Age for last birthday as of September, 1947. 
X Excludes 850 in kindergarten. 
° Excludes 2 in kindergarten, 
a Excludes 9 post-graduates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



TABLE 19 



Age-Grade Distribution of Maryland County Girls Enrolled November, 1947 





Total 


Elementary Grade* 


High School Year 


AGEf 


All 
Grades 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 


8/1 


9 /II 


10/ 
III 


11/ 
IV 


12a 



Maryland County White Girls 



5 and underj 


2,757 


2,753 


4 


























6 


7,753 


5,690 


2,050 


13 
























7 


7,464 


581 


5,122 


1,755 


6 






















8 


7,252 


63 


779 


4,648 


1,753 


9 




















9 


7,215 


9 


108 


933 


4,504 


1,647 


14 


















10 


6,680 
6,723 


5 


25 


164 


1,090 


4,048 


1,312 


4 




31 


1 










11 


1 


6 


42 


281 


1,152 


3,770 


120 




1,269 


81 


1 








12 


6,632 




1 


9 


65 


364 


1,275 


303 


25 


3,214 


1,347 


29 








13 


6,150 




1 


3 


19 


83 


425 


129 


47 


1,059 


3,189 


1,180 


15 






14 


6,085 




1 




4 


15 


98 


38 


20 


379 


1,105 


3,132 


1,259 


34 




15 


5,433 










2 


17 


13 


3 


110 


353 


1,151 


2,707 


1,063 


14 


16 


3,997 


















11 


55 


251 


777 


2,558 


345 


17 


1,570 




















8 


32 


176 


778 


576 


18 


275 






















4 


19 


139 


113 


19 


43 
























4 


17 


22 


Over 19 


6 
























1 


1 


4 


Total number 


76,035 


9,102 


8,097 


7,567 


7,722 


7,320 


6,911 


607 


95 


6,073 


6,139 


5,780 


4,958 


4,590 


1,074 


Number over-age . . 


3,451 


78 


142 


218 


369 


464 


540 


51 


3 


500 


416 


287 


200 


157 


26 


Per cent over-age . . 


4.5 


0.9 


1.8 


2.9 


4.8 


6.3 


7.8 


8.4 


3.2 


8.2 


6.8 


5.0 


4.0 


3.4 


2.4 



Maryland County Colored Girls 



5 and under 


430 


429 


1 


























6 


1,634 


1,267 


363 


4 
























7 


1,551 


272 


986 


288 


5 






















8 


1,533 


50 


311 


871 


289 


12 




















9 


1,534 


12 


105 


396 


800 


213 


8 


















10 


1,432 


3 


28 


118 


396 


693 


186 


5 




2 


1 










11 


1,401 




10 


45 


155 


333 


624 


72 




149 


13 










12 


1,396 




2 


14 


71 


152 


332 


262 




366 


181 


16 








13 


1,352 


2 




1 


28 


77 


169 


135 




173 


553 


207 


7 






14 


1,107 


3 




1 


3 


18 


60 


48 




98 


268 


454 


144 


10 




15 


999 




i 


2 


3 


7 


25 


16 




38 


125 


246 


385 


151 




16 


573 








1 




2 


3 




8 


23 


67 


206 


253 


10 


17 


235 














2 




1 


2 


13 


63 


142 


12 


18 


63 












i 










3 


14 


38 


6 


19 


9 






















2 


1 


6 




Over 19 


1 


























1 




Total number 


15,250 


2,038 


1,807 


1,740 


1,751 


1,505 


1,407 


543 




835 


1,167 


1,008 


820 


601 


28 


Number over-age . . 


1,742 


70 


146 


181 


261 


254 


257 


69 




145 


151 


85 


78 


45 




Per cent over-age . . 


11.4 


3.4 


8.1 


10.4 


14.9 


16.9 


18.3 


12.7 




17.4 


12.9 


8.4 


9.5 


7.5 





* Excludes pupils in special classes and enrollment in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Age for last birthday as of September, 1947. 
t Excludes 761 in kindergarten. 
a Excludes 8 post-graduates. 



56 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 20 

Number and Per Cent of Maryland County Elementary* Pupils Over-Age: 
November 1943, 1945, 1947 





Number 


Over-Age 1947 


Per Cent of Elementary Pupils Over-Age 


County 














1947 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1943 


1945 


1947 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



Total Counties . . . 


5,544 


3,679 


1,865 


10 


9 


9 





5 


5 


7 





3.8 


Allegany 


417 


275 


142 


11 


1 


6 


6 


4 


7 


5 


8 


3.4 


Anne Arundel .... 


495 


313 


182 


11 


2 


9 


1 


6 


8 


8 


4 


5.1 


Baltimore 


1,307 


866 


441 


15 


2 


14 


9 


7 


2 


9 


2 


5.0 


Calvert 


54 


39 


15 


12 


4 


9 


5 


7 


2 


9 


3 


4.5 




64 


37 


27 


5 


1 


8 


2 


4 


4 


4 


8 


3.9 


Carroll 


235 


173 


62 


10 


8 


9 


3 


6 


1 


8 


6 


3.4 


Cecil 


216 


138 


78 


13 


6 


11 


4 


8 





9 


8 


6.1 


Charles 


129 


84 


45 


16 


9 


13 





8 


8 


10 


7 


6.7 


Dorchester 


108 


79 


29 


10 


4 


9 


6 


6 





8 





3.5 


Frederick 


82 


59 


23 


5 


9 


3 


1 


1 


6 


2 


2 


0.9 


Garrett 


384 


233 


151 


17 





14 


7 


11 


5 


13 


6 


9.3 


Harford 


364 


246 


118 


13 


1 


11 


8 


8 


9 


11 


9 


5.8 




275 


200 


75 


21 


3 


19 


3 


14 


6 


19 


6 


8.7 


Kent 


46 


29 


17 


9 


6 


6 


3 


4 


8 


5 


6 


3.9 


Montgomery 


371 


240 


131 


6 


2 


4 


8 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2.5 


Prince George's . . 


325 


218 


107 


10 


7 


6 


2 


2 


8 


3 


6 


1.9 


Queen Anne's .... 


69 


55 


14 


10 


3 


9 


3 


6 





9 





2.6 


St. Mary's 


70 


51 


19 


13 


4 


13 


5 


7 





9 


5 


4.1 


Somerset 


93 


62 


81 


12 


9 


11 





7 


4 


9 


1 


5.3 


Talbot 


68 


49 


19 


12 





10 


6 


5 


5 


7 


5 


3.3 


Washington 


56 


34 


22 


6 


7 


1 


1 





7 





9 


0.6 


Wicomico 


251 


159 


92 


13 


1 


12 


6 


8 


8 


10 


8 


6.6 


Worcester 


65 


40 


25 


9 


8 


8 


1 


4 


4 


5 


4 


3.4 



COLORED 



Total Counties . . . 


3,349 


2,111 


1,238 


19 


8 


19 


2 


15 


1 


18.6 


11.5 


Allegany 


12 


9 


3 


13 


8 


10 


6 


7 


8 


11.1 


4.2 


Anne Arundel .... 


528 


344 


184 


27 


9 


24 


4 


18 





22.8 


12.9 


Baltimore 


553 


338 


215 


28 


8 


28 


1 


21 


4 


25.1 


17.4 


Calvert 


257 


155 


102 


27 


8 


26 


5 


24 


4 


27.9 


20.5 


Caroline 


58 


43 


15 


12 


1 


10 


9 


9 


8 


13.7 


5.4 


Carroll 


25 


16 


9 


15 


1 


16 


7 


9 


8 


12.5 


7.1 


Cecil 


12 


7 


5 


7 


5 


10 


3 


4 


3 


5.0 


3.5 


Charles 


248 


153 


95 


12 


3 


16 


7 


16 


4 


20.0 


12.7 


Dorchester 


66 


39 


27 


10 


6 


9 


9 


6 


6 


7.8 


5.4 


Frederick 


9 


6 


3 


6 


4 


4 


6 


1 


5 


1.9 


1.0 


Garrett 
























Harford 


55 


40 


i5 


15 


3 


15 


4 


8 


4 


11.7 


4.8 


Howard 


77 


53 


24 


17 


8 


16 


2 


13 


5 


17.5 


9.0 


Kent 


45 


26 


19 


18 





15 


2 


9 


8 


11.1 


8.5 


Montgomery 


233 


151 


82 


14 


5 


16 


8 


15 


9 


20.7 


11.2 


Prince George's . . 


518 


333 


185 


27 


4 


22 


8 


16 


6 


21.4 


11.9 


Queen Anne's .... 


32 


20 


12 


8 


5 


9 


4 


6 


9 


8.4 


5.3 


St. Mary's 


102 


64 


38 


23 


9 


21 


2 


15 


4 


17.7 


12.7 


Somerset 


149 


99 


50 


17 


5 


17 


7 


16 





19.5 


11.7 


Talbot 


139 


81 


58 


16 


9 


22 


8 


19 


6 


21.9 


17.1 


Washington 


9 


5 


4 


8 


7 


9 


6 


5 


3 


6.0 


4.7 


Wicomico 


130 


71 


59 


58 


4 


13 


7 


12 





14.1 


10.2 


Worcester 


92 


58 


34 


12 


3 


11 


6 


11 





12.7 


8.2 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



TABLE 21 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children in Maryland 
Financed with State Funds: 1947-48 



County 



Total State . . , 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Allegany . 
A. Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert . . . 
Caroline . . 



Carroll . . . 

Cecil 

Charles . . . 
Dorchester 
Frederick . 



Garrett . 
Harford 
Howard 
Kent . . . 
Montgomery 

P. George's . 
Qu. Anne's . . 
St. Mary's . . 
Somerset . . . 
Talbot 



Washington 
Wicomico. . 
Worcester . 



Total 



Pupils 



673 

a364 

a309 

47 
20 
87 
2 



Expendi- 
tures 



6$30,573.89 

10,000.00 

20,573.89 

3,063.90 
1,283.60 
6,483.65 



1,579.77 
282.28 
243.14 
499.00 
592.27 

356.40 
61.88 
331.53 
430.26 
2,124.46 

1,446.94 



126.00 
173.16 

480.54 
358.20 
656.91 



Home Teaching 



Pupils Teach- 
ers 



411 

224 

187 

13 
13 
53 



136 

10 

126 

11 
11 
21 



13 



Expendi- 
tures 



$16,580.17 

904.40 

15,675.77 

1,378.30 
712.68 
4,624.09 



1,579.77 
282.28 
243.14 
499.00 
403.02 

247.80 
61.88 
331.53 
430.26 
2,058.31 

1,038.90 



126.00 
173.16 

480.54 
348.20 
656.91 



Transportation to 
Regular Classes 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



$3,940.22 

1,265.60 

2,674.62 

1,685.60 
220.92 
92.06 



189.25 
108.60 



66.15 
302.04 



10.00 



Instruction in 
Special Schools 



Pupils 



222 



al34 




a72 


16 


15 




3 


" 2 


20 


12 


1 


1 


3 




1 




1 




1 




5 




1 




5 




1 




1 




7 


1 



Expendi- 
tures 



a The two teachers for whom reimbursement of $7,830.00 was paid, instructed 134 Baltimore City and 72 county 
children under treatment in the City hospital schools. 

b In addition to this amount, $3,361.16 was spent for clinical services and audiometric testing of the hard of hear- 
ing in the county schools. 



58 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 22— Special Classes for Retarded Children in Counties, 1947-48 





Number 




Average 


County 


of 


Enrollment 


Enrollment 




Classes 




per Class 



WHITE 



1946-47 


53 


1,122 


21.2 


1947-48 


46 


861 


18.7 


Allegany 


*11 


193 


17.5 


Anne Arundel 


2 


42 


21.0 


Caroline 


2 


38 


19.0 


Carroll 


t2 


37 


18.5 


Cecil 


18 


18.0 


Dorchester 




12 


12.0 


Prince George's 




14 


14.0 


Somerset 




19 


19.0 


Talbot 




16 


16.0 


Washington 


120 


431 


21.6 


Wicomico 


1 


22 


22.0 


Worcester 


3 


°19 


19.0 


COLORED 


1946-47 


1 


20 


20.0 


1947-48 


1 


22 


22.0 


Wicomico 


1 


22 


22.0 



* One school had two classes, one had three, and one had six. 
t One school had two classes. 

j Four schools each had one class, three each had two classes, two each had three classes, and one had 
four classes. 

° Enrollment of remedial classes excluded. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



TABLE 23 



Baltimore City Special Classes and Highwood School for Semester 
Ending June 30, 1948 



Kind of Class 


Number 
of 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Per Cent 
of 


Promoted or Making 
Satisfactory- 
Improvement* 




Classes 






Attend- 
ance 


Number 


Per Centt 



Physically Handicapped White Pupils 



Total and Average 


20 


368 


372 


88 





323 


87.8 


Orthopedic 


10 


199 


203 


87 





162 


81.4 


Sight Conservation 


8 


41 


42 


86 





37 


90.2 


Hearing Conservation 


2 


41 


40 


92 





39 


95.1 


Deaf 


2 


29 


28 


85 





27 


93.1 


Mixed J 


3 


58 


59 


89 





58 


100.0 


Physically Handicapped 


Colored 


Pupils 








Total and Average 


8 


123 


121 


90 





120 


97.6 


Orthopedic 


4 


63 


62 


91 


9 


60 


95.2 


Sight Conservation 


2 


39 


39 


89 


7 


39 


100.0 


Hearing Conservation 


1 


11 


10 


90 





11 


100.0 


Deaf 


1 


10 


10 


90 





10 


100.0 



Socially Handicapped White Pupils 



Highwood School 


1 


66 


64 


82.0 

















Mentally Handicapped White Pupils 



Total and Average 


95 


2,085 


2,032 


80 


6 


1,801 


86.4 


Opportunity 


67 


1,427 


1,317 


82 


7 


1,246 


87.3 


Special Center 


1 


21 


21 


80 


9 


20 


95.2 




27 


637 


694 


76 


5 


535 


84.0 


Mentally Handicapped 


Colored Pupils 








Total and Average 


101 


2,175 


2,004 


76 


9 


1,638 


75.3 


Opportunity 


60 


1,335 


1,252 


79 


5 


1,050 


78.7 


Special Center 


2 


35 


36 


77 


7 


29 


82.9 


Shop Center 


39 


805 


716 


72 


4 


559 


69.4 



* Making satisfactory improvement applies to the opportunity group, 
t Per cent of net roll of classes involved. 

t Junior high school class consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 29; sight, 6; 
cardiac, 20; deaf, 4; and hearing, 1. 



60 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 24— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex-Year' 
1939-1948, and by Color-Sex-County and Baltimore City for Year 
Ending June 30, 1948 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


BY YEAR 


1939 


6,306 


2,750 


3,556 


♦576 


*234 


*342 


1940 


6,813 


3,017 


3,796 


*673 


*245 


*428 


1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


*708 


*249 


*459 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


*659 


*256 


*403 


1943 


6,741 


2,887 


3,854 


*689 


*271 


*418 


1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1947° 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1948 



Total State 


10,462 


4,811 


5,651 


1,458 


579 


879 


Baltimore City 


2,803 


1,394 


1,409 


569 


188 


381 


Total Counties 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


Allegany 


755 


335 


420 


6 


3 


3 


Anne Arundel 


524 


216 


308 


99 


33 


66 


Baltimore 


1,250 


563 


687 


54 


14 


40 


Calvert 


62 


25 


37 


23 


8 


15 


Caroline 


153 


72 


81 


41 


20 


21 


Carroll 


319 


126 


193 


18 


8 


10 


Cecil 


248 


111 


137 


21 


11 


10 




91 


41 


50 


40 


15 


25 


Dorchester 


191 


79 


112 


51 


33 


18 


Frederick 


513 


234 


279 


38 


12 


26 


Garrett 


183 


90 


93 








Harford 


356 


161 


195 


48 


24 


24 




131 


61 


70 


31 


13 


18 


Kent 


96 


41 


55 


28 


18 


10 




655 


tJ306 


t349 


48 


27 


21 


Prince George's 


842 


388 


454 


58 


27 


31 




85 


42 


43 


24 


12 


12 


St. Mary's 


63 


25 


38 


25 


8 


17 


Somerset 


116 


43 


73 


50 


20 


30 


Talbot 


117 


54 


63 


37 


20 


17 


Washington 


534 


251 


283 


6 


5 


1 


Wicomico 


232 


97 


135 


86 


32 


54 


Worcester 


143 


56 


87 


57 


28 


29 



* Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 

t Includes 22 boys and 17 girls graduates of '48 Summer School, but excludes 41 boys and 18 girls 
graduates of '47 Summer School. 

X Includes 6 Veterans, not enrolled, who received diplomas in June, 1948. 
See footnote * on TABLE 26. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



TABLE 25 — Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School Graduates Who 
Entered State Teachers Colleges Fall after Graduation, 1939-1948 





WHITE 


COLORED 




High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 


High School 


Entrants to State Teachers 




Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 


Graduates 


Colleges Fall Following 


Year 








Graduation 










Graduation 










Number 


Per Cent 






Number 


Per Cent 




Boy 3 


Girls 










Boys 


Girls 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1939 . . 


2,750 


3,556 


79 


179 


2.9 


4.9 


f234 


t342 


7 


21 


3.0 


6.1 


1940. . 


3,017 


3,796 


61 


141 


2.0 


3.7 


t245 


t428 


8 


f40 


3.3 


9.3 


1941 . . 


3,168 


3,870 


36 


126 


1.1 


3.3 


t249 


t459 


5 


22 


2.1 


5.0 


1942 . . 


3,165 


4,011 


37 


74 


1.2 


1.8 


t256 


t403 




t25 




6.2 


1943 . . 


2,887 


3,854 


23 


88 


0.8 


2.3 


f271 


t418 


'8 


20 


3^0 


4.8 


1944 . . 


2,493 


4,057 


15 


72 


1.7 


1.8 


271 


447 


6 


32 


4.5 


7.2 


1945. . 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


279 


476 


5 


37 


1.8 


7.8 


1946. . 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1947*. 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3.1 


6.7 


1948. . 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2.0 


6.4 



* See footnote * on TABLE 26. 

t Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five 
years work above grade 7. 

For 1948 graduates and teachers college entrants for individual high schools see TABLE XXII. 



TABLE 26 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of County High School Graduates 
Continuing Education or Staying or Working at Home Year Following Graduation, 

1938-1947 









Number 


Per Cent 


Graduates of 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or 
Working at 
Home, Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE 



1938 


2,566 


3,364 


745 


1,114 


347 


1,249 


29 





33 


1 


13 


5 


37 


1 


1939 


2,750 


3,556 


761 


1,118 


254 


1,133 


27 


7 


31 


4 


9 


2 


31 


9 


1940 


3,017 


3,796 


699 


1,107 


147 


916 


23 


1 


29 


1 


4 


9 


24 


1 


1941 


3,168 


3,870 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19 


6 


26 





3 


6 


20 





1942 


3,165 


4,011 


539 


832 


24 


540 


17 





20 


7 





8 


13 


5 


1943 


2,887 


3,854 


313 


953 


8 


434 


10 


8 


24 


8 





3 


11 


3 


1944 


2,493 


4,057 
3,986 


338 


1,177 


12 


448 


13 


6 


29 








5 


11 





1945 


2,545 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


1 


30 


9 





7 


14 


7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 




420 


22 


7 


29 


3 


1 


4 


16 


9 


1947 


*3,255 


*4,205 


901 


1,268 


'77 


769 


22 


7 


30 


2 


2 


4 


18 


3 



COLORED 



1938 


192 


293 


45 


77 


17 


55 


23 


4 


26.3 


8.9 


18 


8 


1939 


227 


333 


56 


78 


12 


86 


24 


6 


23.4 


5.3 


25 


9 


1940 


236 


413 


44 


90 


11 


68 


18 


6 


21.8 


4.7 


16 


5 


1941 


236 


444 


42 


76 


3 


75 


17 


8 


17.2 


1 3 


16 


9 


1942 


247 


385 


32 


89 


1 


77 


12 


8 


25 4 


4 


20 





1943 


263 


401 


26 


118 




46 


9 


9 


29.4 




11 


5 


1944 


271 


447 


53 


145 


' i 


52 


19 


6 


32.4 


0'4 


11 


7 


1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30 


1 


38.4 


7 


12 


4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22 


3 


33.7 


3 3 


19 


3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18 


8 


28.6 


3.9 


21 


4 



* Number of white graduates for 1946-47, as shown on TABLES 24 and 25 is not in agreement with 
number given on TABLES 26 and 27. TABLES 24 and 25 include the '46 summer school graduates of 
Montgomery County while TABLES 26 and 27 exclude these and include the '47 summer school graduates 
instead. This was necessary because of a change in method of reporting summer school graduates. 



62 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 35 — Enrollment* in Each Year of Maryland County High Schools by Year, 

1939-1948 



Year 




GRADE 


Ending 
June 30 


Total 


7 


8 


9-1 


10-11 


ll-III 


12-IV 


Post- 
graduate 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



1939 


36,134 






12,064 


9,332 


8,062 


6,478 


198 


1940 


37,858 






12,206 


10,073 


8,352 


7,041 


186 


1941 


39,225 






12,554 


10,342 


8,848 


7,323 


158 


1942 


39,316 






12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


1943 


38,394 






12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


1944 


36,797 






12,124 


9,764 


8,065 


6,833 


11 


1945 


37,154 






12,314 


9,842 


8,201 


6,783 


14 


1946 


51,922 


10,745 


6,397 


9,305 


10,090 


8,393 


6,967 


25 


1947 


54,886 


12,025 


11,667 


6,613 


8,043 


8,846 


7,629 


63 


1948 


56,524 


12,445 


12,448 


10,960 


5,571 


7,166 


7,897 


37 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



1939 


4,484 






1,673 


1,278 


906 


627 




1940 


4,740 






1,834 


1,234 


979 


691 


"2 


1941 


5,045 






1,961 


1,349 


953 


780 


2 


1942 


5,009 






1,857 


1,450 


994 


708 




1943 


5,159 






1,865 


1,422 


1,088 


784 




1944 


5,083 






1,957 


1,333 


1,004 


789 




1945 


5,138 






1,804 


1,518 


1,016 


799 


. . .j 


1946 


6,899 


1,015 


818 


1,590 


1,475 


1,198 


803 




1947 


7,624 


1,238 


1,823 


1,186 


1,178 
639 


1,178 


1,021 
969 




1948 


8,173 


1,608 


2,128 


1,829 


999 


"i 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment of individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 36 — White Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland County 
HigK Schools for the Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 



ENGLISH 





7t 


8t 


9t 


10/11 


11 /III 


12 /IV 


Other % 


Total Counties 


12,428 


12,468 


10,973 


5,683 


7,345 


7,962 


1,025 


Allegany 


1,280 


1,159 


1,080 


975 


899 


767 


123 


Anne Arundel . . 


805 


899 


734 


612 


139 


556 




Baltimore 


2,483 


2,156 


1,777 


297 


1,483 


1,285 


284 


Calvert 


81 


101 




93 


57 


64 


28 


Caroline 


213 


185 


i87 




191 


182 


18 


Carroll 


600 


539 


425 




420 


338 


84 


Cecil 


423 


373 


326 


' S 


323 


266 


25 


Charles 


199 


203 


132 




174 


96 




Dorchester 


271 


256 


206 




233 


193 


30 


Frederick 


668 


719 


631 


558 


29 


546 


17 


Garrett 


102 


336 


297 




256 


193 




Harford 


424 


494 


439 


51 


427 


369 




Howard 


248 


201 


211 




180 


136 




Kent 


112 


133 


113 




128 


100 


25 


Montgomery . . . 


1,166 


1,112 


1,072 


909 


801 


638 


282 


Prince George's . 


1,510 


1,429 


1,306 


1,044 


166 


891 




Queen Anne's . . 


171 


131 


125 




112 


83 




St. Mary's 


147 


115 


134 


39 


99 


71 




Somerset 


172 


190 


143 




136 


124 




Talbot 


177 


176 


177 




162 


121 




Washington .... 


970 


1,039 


998 


828 


686 


554 


i09 


Wicomico 




340 


276 


274 


58 


239 




Worcester 


206 


182 


184 




186 


150 





* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

t Includes 519 taking Journalism, 236 taking Public Speaking, 184 taking Dramatics, 56 taking Radio 
Workshop, and 30 taking English V. 



TABLE 37 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland 
County High Schools, for the Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


ENGLISH 


7t 


8t 


9 /It 


10/11 


11 /III 


12 /IV 


Total Counties 


1,608 


2,028 


1,703 


699 


1,082 


971 


Allegany 


19 


20 


17 


15 


17 


6 


Anne Arundel 


110 


167 


217 


179 




122 


Baltimore 


256 


187 


143 




ioi 


56 


Calvert 






97 


'77 


59 


28 


Caroline 




62 


42 




59 


44 


Carroll 


28 


34 


15 




19 


18 


Cecil 


56 


48 


27 




39 


21 


Charles 


52 


109 


67 


45 


83 


45 


Dorchester 




135 


92 




95 


55 


Frederick 


45 


66 


55 


40 




41 


Garrett 














Harford 


93 


'80 


89 




68 


56 


Howard 


51 


71 


44 




38 


33 


Kent 


76 


55 


49 




33 


29 


Montgomery 




165 


146 


104 


88 


52 


Prince George's 


323 


283 


216 


155 




65 




56 


43 


41 




40 


26 


St. Mary's 


71 


53 


47 




44 


28 


Somerset 


130 


97 


76 




76 


52 


Talbot 


70 


87 




65 


58 


38 


Washington 


32 


23 


18 


19 


23 


8 


Wicomico 




135 


101 




72 


89 


Worcester 


i40 


108 


104 




70 


59 



* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 



72 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 









1 


1,070 
383 
450 
525 
301 
266 
127 
176 
121 
62 


n 




Econom- 
ic Geog- 
raphy 


1,057 
1,387 
1,761 
2,011 
1,732 
1,661 
1,614 
1,587 
1,547 
1,691 


r 


1 




l 




1*5 




3,460 
4,153 
3,901 
4,317 
3,757 
3,605 
3,616 
4,401 
4,505 
4,692 


II 


II 


7,990 
7,970 
8,996 
8,648 
8,637 
7,759 
8,419 
8,516 
9,178 
7,231 








1 


iliiP 


JI 




mm™ 


I 


1 


3,681 
3,604 
4,366 
5,433 
5,484 
6,228 
6,511 
6,134 
4,597 
3,824 


Ml 


4,577 
5,966 
7,482 
8,168 
8,518 
8,379 
8,206 
6,452 
5,107 
9,334 


ii 


4 


6,393 
11,536 
12,343 


7th 
Gradef 


10,716 
12,953 
12,840 








Year 
and Count 


1938- 39 

1939- 40 

1940- 41 

1941- 42 

1942- 43 

1943- 44 

1944- 45 

1945- 46 

1946- 47 

1947- 48 



§3§*39355«8S533£3*S3g*S 



II 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 39 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies in the 
Maryland County High Schools, for the Year Ending June 30, 1948 





Social 


Studies 






>> 
























locial 


>> 

u 


istor 


5R 


>> 










b 




County 


Gradet 


Gradet 


ics and S 
tudies 


•Id Histo 


opean H 


ted Stat( 
history 


blems of 
'emocrac 


graphy 


nomic 
eograph; 


ology 


sumer 
ducation 


ro Histo 


chology 




-a 








u 
3 




00 





go 




CM 
O W 


8" 






t- 


00 


'6 


i 


H 




Ah 


O 


w 


03 


u 


Z 


Ph 


Total Counties .... 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 


Allegany 


19 


20 


17 




15 




23 














Anne Arundel 


110 


267 


217 


179 




122 
















Baltimore .... 


256 


187 


143 


43 


33 


47 


34 














Calvert 






108 


55 




53 


25 














Caroline 






62 


42 




59 


38 














Carroll 


28 


34 


15 






37 
















Cecil 


56 


48 


27 






21 


39 














Charles 


52 


109 


67 


45 




83 


45 














Dorchester .... 




135 








95 


9 




92 










Frederick 


'45 


66 




40 




















Garrett 




























Harford 


93 


80 


89 






35 


56 




68 












51 


71 


44 






33 


38 














Kent 


76 


55 








29 






29 










Montgomery. . 




165 


i45 


67 




86 
















Prince George's 


333 


284 


216 








67 




65 










Queen Anne's . 


76 


43 


41 






40 


26 














St. Mary's. . . . 


71 


53 


13 






19 


9 




44 










Somerset 


130 


97 


76 






76 


52 














Talbot 


70 


87 




65 






38 




58 










Washington . . . 


32 






37 




23 


31 














Wicomico 




i35 




72 






89 


ioi 






60 






Worcester .... 


i46 


108 


ioi 






70 


59 















* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 



74 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



I 

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II 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



TABLE 41 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science in the Maryland 
County High Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1948 





Science 


























0) 




Q> 


o 


















V 






w 






o 












c 

0) 




§ 


c 

<D 






« 
a 






County 


4— 
V 
T3 

2 


radef 


al Sci 


b 


1 


'S 

GQ 
? 


istry 


s 


r Sciei 


n 

S 
a 


♦+ 




a 


O 


03 
C 

w 


iolof 


J3 
"3 


ppli 


hem 


hysi 


o 
'a 


Inch 


ealt 






00 


C 


« 


Ph 


< 


O 


Oh 


w 




E 




1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


21 


181 


Allegany 


19 


20 


17 


15 




10 
















267 


101 


76 








107 








Baltimore 


256 


187 


36 


107 










157 






Calvert 






92 


44 






68 














62 




41 






76 




23 






Carroll 


28 


34 


15 








37 










Cecil 


56 


48 


27 








39 












24 


55 


67 


45 




28 


55 


i9 








Dorchester 




135 


92 








45 


14 










45 


66 


55 


is 






10 










Garrett 


























53 


35 


89 








56 








iio 




51 


71 


44 






38 






33 






Kent 


76 


55 


49 






33 












Montgomery 






151 


80 






37 


22 










324 


283 


214 


65 




87 




43 






39 




56 


43 


41 








40 


26 








St. Mary's 


71 


53 


13 






47 














130 


97 


76 








100 




28 






Talbot 


70 


87 


65 








58 


38 








Washington 


32 


23 


37 


3i 




















135 


101 


72 








29 






32 




62 


108 


27 


70 






is 









* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
t If given in other than 7th and /or 8th grades. 



76 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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cocococococococococo 



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<o i> i> i-h oo oo 10 



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OSOsOsasOSOSOSOSOSOS 



•eooo -o m ■ cm 



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W^eMi-HOSi-IOt-COi-iOOeOOt-COi-i'fOi-ieM 

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COCDCM-^ • CO <M CO CM CD CM i-t 00 OS -CM -HMH< 
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i TfCDOS -CO CM OS CD CO 

cd 10 • ec <M 



• CM i~H ■ • • -CM 
■CM CO • • • • CM 



'S'cDi-i ■ o i-i i-i o t- ec ec cd y-» m in c- o t> as cd 
i-hcdo • mio 10 as o co cm i-h c~ f cm o t- ^< oo oo 
■^•Tft- -i-ieocM i-i cm -tea wt-wnH cd iH 



osocDi-icDt-T»<eocooccDT}<^H^j<t-oci-iirtascDCMCDeM 
moio O-oc eot-oi-Oi-tocosoeOi-'CMcoi-ioct-i^ccoo 

HO>HHHlSCC(NNt-CO'<i l NHHTliHrHHHOMH 



oifteC'-i'^xeoascM-^cMioccoC'-icsi-icMeoc-o] 

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Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and 
Business Education in the Maryland County High Schools, for the Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 



County 


Mathematics 


General 
Mathematics 


Algebra 


Plane Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Math. Review 


Vocational and 
Applied Math. 


Commercial and 
Business. Arith. 


Business 
Educationt 


7th 
Grade 


8th 
Grade 


I 


II 


Total Counties 


1,612 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 




19 


20 






17 


13 






8 








110 


267 






212 




is 


is 


194 


28 


83 


Baltimore 


256 


187 


143 




99 


36 




21 








Calvert 






115 




54 


40 




22 












62 


42 




31 










44 




Carroll 


28 


34 


15 


19 








is 








Cecil 


56 


48 


27 


39 












2i 




Charles 


52 


109 


67 


45 


37 






45 


27 






Dorchester 






135 


92 




6 


ii 






ii 






45 


66 


55 




io 


18 












Garrett 
























Harford 


93 


80 


89 




33 






32 


24 








51 


71 


44 






24 








33 




Kent 


76 


55 


49 














29 




Montgomery 




132 






89 


3i 




40 








Prince George's 


327 


285 


176 




121 






67 


27 






Queen Anne's 


56 


43 


41 






40 








26 




St. Mary's 


71 


53 


47 






25 




28 




44 




Somerset 


130 


97 


76 










24 


76 


28 




Talbot 


70 


87 






58 


38 








67 






32 


23 






37 


31 












Wicomico 




135 


42 




78 




29 


29 




49 


99 


Worcester 


i40 


108 


59 




45 


a 








42 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. 



78 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 44 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1939 to 1948 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1939 


2,249 


3,276 


1,547 


2,663 


25 


29 


1940 


2,115 


3,328 


1,468 


2,594 


33 


48 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 


1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 


1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 


1944 


1,767 


2,927 


719 


1,652 


384 


736 


1945 


1,825 


2,986 


877 


1,645 


452 


762 


1946t 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947+ 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948f 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1948 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland 
County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1948 





Latin 




French 


Spanish 


County 


















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties .... 


23 




29 


22 


59 


1 


20 


Anne Arundel 


13 




15 


3 


19 


1 


20 


Montgomery . . 








19 


40 






Wicomico .... 


io 




U 











* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment in individual schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 46— White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Years 1939 to 1948 



Year Ending 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


June 30 












Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1939 


8,318 


842 


2,049 


8,333 


2,613 


1940 


9,415 


892 


2,344 


8,903 


2,920 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3,287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 


1943 


10,731 


1,244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 


1944 


8,904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946f 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947t 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948t 


15,414 


1,119 


2,629 


16,165 


1,596 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Figures include duplicates, if any, and enrollment in junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition 
to last four years as previously reported. 

For 1948 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


Total Counties 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


Allegany 


22 


18 




19 


19 


Anne Arundel 


72 


119 


115 


155 


134 


Baltimore 


177 






248 




Calvert 






83 




162 


Caroline 






108 


45 


58 


Carroll 


49 




36 


65 




Cecil 


95 






96 




Charles 






137 




98 


Dorchester 


24 


48 


116 


119 


54 


Frederick 


66 


15 


29 


83 


33 


Garrett 












Harford 


162 






146 




Howard 






85 


33 


68 


Kent 






82 


84 




Montgomery 


160 




42 


154 


76 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


191 




49 


309 


127 


. 90 






80 


36 


St. Mary's 






65 


43 


63 


Somerset 


111 






233 




Talbot 


80 




45 


87 


68 


Washington 


68 






55 




Wicomico 


147 




35 


223 




Worcester 


19 




57 




72 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment in individual schools, see TABLE XXIII. 



80 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



5-11 



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rHCMCMrHrHrHrHrHrH 



ooc<jooi-i«ocor-<-*a><M 

OON<*TfMTf»00 

eocococoNcococo'*'* 



Ot>NlflC5<BNt-OH 

coco<ec5i-it-C5t-'-iia 



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otot-t-oocooooocoi-i 



Hcotoooecooot- 

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oo«otoai-<s"co<Nt-«ooo 
CM©rH<j5rHc»rHcoast~ 



O^NOO(DO)NOine5 
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, "1 °i '-L '"I '~i H ® 

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woNMcortoeomcq 

0>OOiOU5Ht>!COeC 

as©osasLoeoeocMLO-rj« 



oseOrHoseoooLocMrHoo 
osoot-rHoo<eooLO-<i't- 
oooot>o^i-H©asas©ce 

CM* CM* CM* CM* CO CO* CM* CM*" CO* CM* 



OOlOHlCOt-HffllO 

c-eoaseorHCMt>eot~CM 

t-t-LOLO-tfCOCMCMCMCM 



??2ricMco^vc«ot-oo 

CO - '}'"<J'-»l<'^'«J<TfTl<^<'^< 

C5CTiaie75C75a>c?io>aia3 
i i i T 1 "T 1 T 1 T 1 r 7 T 1 T 1 
eoeo^'<l , •^ , "<f"*'^ , -^'^ , 

OSOSOSOSOSOsOSOSOSOS 



LO • LO CO 



■ to t> as eo • cm 



•CO • <0 • t- 



• CO OS C- -rH 



Tjt^mno • -<£>T}<rHt- -CO -OOLOOO • CO CO 'COON 
COCMt-rH • • CM CM CM rH • rH • LO LO ■ rH tO -CM CO «D 
rH CM 



os -o> •too'* 
lo -ti« -i-ieocOTH 

CM CM 



oo as as -<* t- »-i t- eo oo as t> cm os cm o lo -thos-^oscm 

00 CM O CO CM rH CO LO OS OS CO LO C- rH <D rH CO ■ CM OS LO LO 
CM i-l rHrH rH 



■»#rHto • co co oo i-i t- to os t- eo t- to cm lo cm oo cm *-h ■ 
lo cm cm • lo as oo t- co <o t- as © ■># th cm <o t- oo <o t~ co ■ 

LO CM © CM HH HH t}<-<3< Hrli 



lo th cm • lo i-i © c- t- ^" «c lo to oo as co eo as oo cm eo 
Lot-cM ■ cm rH eo lo os cm oo cm i-i lo to eo i-i eo 

CM rH rH HH 



os«D© •^cMeot>OiHCM©e«'»CMeo^coo2LOiHt-- : -i 
eooot- • to as as lo oo eo to © oo cm c- cm ■<* to to lo -rj< to 

CO lO tH rH rH CM rH 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 49— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1939 to 1948 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1939 


7,840 


9,967 


1,534 


1,984 


6,935 


6,934 


1940 


7,978 


10,585 


1,836 


2,254 


8,216 


8,168 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2,472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2,199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946t 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947f 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948f 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1948 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



TABLE 50 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education in 
Maryland County High Schools for Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties .... 


3,017 


3,584 


823 


777 


3,154 


3,503 


Allegany 


46 


48 






18 


21 


Anne Arundel 


343 


376 


156 


2 


289 


390 


Baltimore .... 


343 


440 


210 


270 


415 


177 


Calvert 
















105 


102 






104 


98 


Carroll 


74 


100 






49 


65 


Cecil 


95 


96 






95 


96 


Charles 


159 


224 


12 


16 


132 


196 


Dorchester. . . . 


130 


135 






191 


175 


Frederick 


121 


176 


ii 


28 


106 


141 


Garrett 
















92 


107 


i9 


21 


isi 


205 


Howard 


102 


97 


33 


18 


118 


119 


Kent 


117 


125 


35 


41 


117 


125 


Montgomery. . 


106 


97 


94 


93 


249 


287 


Prince George's 


459 


577 


108 


139 


464 


568 


Queen Anne's . 














St. Mary's. . . . 


72 


lio 


37 


34 


57 


75 


Somerset 


215 


256 






111 


233 


Talbot 










134 


184 


Washington . . . 


68 


55 


is 


14 


68 


55 


Wicomico .... 


157 


195 






172 


185 


Worcester .... 


213 


268 


84 


101 


84 


108 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
For enrollment in individual schools, see TABLE XXIII. 



82 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



0>O — 
O o 



'H lO 10 Tj< iH 



OJS 




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g «CQ • O 



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H-Q M-S SK o m Si gj § -g o-S g g« g g | 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



TABLE 52 

White and Colored Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County 
High Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Boys 


Girls 




Boys 


Girls 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Garrett 



1,139 


1,449 


Harford 




Howard 


87 


126 




60 


38 


St. Mary's 


180 


130 


9 


28 


Somerset 


17 


27 


Talbot 


12 


22 




49 


40 


Worcester 



168 


246 


65 


70 


115 


255 


148 


173 


15 


18 


12 


7 


69 


86 


99 


138 


34 


45 



COLORED SCHOOLS 



105 


160 


Montgomery 


27 


21 






Prince George's 


2 


10 


10 


13 


Talbot 


20 


18 


4 


16 


Wicomico 


32 


56 


10 


26 









Total 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . 



84 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Twelfth Grade 
Girls 


Failing 
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Number 
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Number 
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Failing 
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Number 
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1,051 
1,257 
1,288 
1,831 
1,337 
1,319 
1,525 
1,561 
1,412 














974 
1,017 
900 
989 
1,073 
1,116 
1,088 
1,259 
1,198 
1,216 




1,149 
1,164 
1,662 
1,602 
2,337 
1,650 
1,545 
1,749 
1,674 
1,429 




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1,279 
1,213 
1,111 
1,175 
1,051 
1,240 
1,272 
1,672 
1,445 
1,476 










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1,480 
1,706 
1,208 
1,241 
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90 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 60 — Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared To Qualify 
for Standard Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1945, 1947, 1948 





1945* 


1947* 


1948* 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


grand total 


212 


100 


248 


117 


349 


168 


ELEMENTARY 














120 Semester hours 


94 


56 


65 


50 


92 


58 


JUNIOR HIGH (Core) 










1 




HIGH SCHOOL 














Total High School 


118 


44 


183 


67 


256 


110 


Agriculture 






10 


1 


10 


4 


Art 


3 




1 




7 




Commerce 


4 




2 




2 




English 


32 


12 


34 


io 


41 


13 


Foreign Language (any) . . 


8 


1 


12 


3 


22 


9 


Home Economics 


19 


14 


19 


13 


23 


15 


Industrial Arts 






5 


7 


9 


2 


Library Science 


2 












Mathematics 


5 


6 


i<j 


5 


12 


'8 


Music 


10 


2 


9 


4 


9 


7 


Physical Education: 
















1 


2 


15 


7 


20 


16 




1 


3 


10 


10 


15 


12 


Science: 














General Science 


3 


2 


4 


3 


19 


10 




3 




5 




9 






3 




5 




1 




Physics 


1 








1 




Social Sciences 


23 


'2 


32 


4 


55 


i4 


Speech 






1 




1 





* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in h?s first major). 



92 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 61 



Maryland Students Who Completed in June, 1947, at Colleges Indicated, the 
Education Courses Necessary for Certification Compared With the Number of 
Graduates Who Took Positions in the County High Schools in the Fall of 1947* 





Number of Graduates 




Who met requirements for 




College or University 


certification from 










Who received 








Maryland county 




Maryland 


Baltimore 


high school 




Counties 


City 


positions* 


College of Notre Dame . . 


1 


7 


1 


Goucher College 


1 


3 


2 


Hood College. . . 


4 




1 


Johns Hopkins University 




6 




St. Joseph's College . . . 


3 




University of Maryland . . 


39 


16 


32 


Washington College. 


11 


2 


5 


Western Maryland College. . 


32 


7 


34 



According to reports from colleges. 



TABLE 62 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties 





White 


Colored 


Year 
Ending June 30 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1939 


283 


9 


6 


549 


38 


5 


79 


12 





76 


50 


.7 


1940 


288 


9 


8 


602 


40 


3 


78 


12 


1 


79 


48 


5 


1941 


232 


8 


6 


719 


40 


5 


74 


11 


9 


83 


47 


8 


1942 


190 


7 


1 


670 


36 


2 


66 


10 


9 


89 


46 


4 


1943 


139 


5 


2 


538 


29 


7 


58 


9 


7 


81 


42 





1944 


108 


4 





488 


27 


3 


44 


7 


5 


72 


34 


8 


1945 


104 


3 


7 


465 


25 


8 


43 


7 


1 


78 


36 


8 


1946 


107 


3 


9 


629 


29 


4 


45 


7 


5 


88 


33 


7 


1947 


125 


4 


5 


787 


33 


8 


52 


8 


6 


103 


34 


4 


1948 


161 


5 


4 


931 


36 


7 


62 


10 


1 


126 


37 


2 



See TABLE X. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 63 — County Teachers in Service October, 1947, Who Attended Summer 

School, Summer 1947 





Teachers in Service Oct. 1947 Who 
Attended Summer School in 1947 




Number of 


County 


Total 


Number 


Per Cent 


Summer School Attended 


Teachers 




Num- 
ber 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 




Elem. 


High 



White County Teachers 



Total White . . . 


1,028 


550 


478 


18 


4 


18 


9 


Allegany 


60 


18 


42 


6 


7 


17 


2 


Anne Arundel . . 


54 


22 


32 


11 


2 


19 


3 


Baltimore 


216 


149 


67 


29 


2 


21 


4 


Calvert 


11 


10 


1 


41 


7 


5 







12 


8 


4 


19 





8 





Carroll 


44 


16 


28 


14 


5 


23 


7 


Cecil 


32 


22 


10 


27 


5 


12 


3 


Charles 


24 


9 


15 


20 


9 


33 


3 


Dorchester .... 


12 


4 


8 


6 


3 


13 


6 


Frederick 


36 


17 


19 


12 


3 


13 


4 


Garrett 


38 


25 


13 


23 


8 


22 


8 


Harford 


32 


16 


16 


13 


8 


14 


4 




23 


12 


11 


21 


8 


20 


4 


Kent 


10 


3 


7 


9 


1 


21 


2 


Montgomery . . . 


166 


82 


84 


22 


5 


28 


6 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 


127 


77 


50 


22 


4 


17 


4 


1 


1 





2 


7 








St. Mary's 


9 


7 


2 


19 


4 


7 


4 


Somerset 


10 


1 


9 


2 


6 


23 


7 


Talbot 


3 


1 


2 


2 


6 


5 





Washington . . . 


93 


47 


46 


20 


4 


21 


7 


Wicomico 


9 


3 


6 


3 


8 


10 


9 


Worcester 


6 





6 








12 


2 



Total 

University of Maryland 

Johns Hopkins University 

Columbia University 

George Washington University . 

Western Maryland College 

Shepherd State Teachers College . 

Pennsylvania State College 

Frostburg State Teachers College 

West Virginia University , 

University of Delaware , 

Wilson Teachers College 

University of Maine , 

Fairmont Teachers College 

Catholic University , 

Duke University , 

University of North Carolina 

University of Pennsylvania , 

New York University 

Madison College 

Temple University 

University of Pittsburgh 

University of Wisconsin 

Seventy Others 



550 


478 


180 


172 


112 


27 


52 


62 


29 


25 


19 


26 


19 


7 


8 


16 


19 


1 


7 


10 


12 


3 


11 


1 


6 


4 


6 


3 


2 


7 


2 


6 


2 


6 





8 





8 


1 


6 


4 


3 


2 


5 


1 


6 


56 


66 



Colored County Teachers 



Total Colored . . 


331 


236 


95 


38 


9 


27 


9 


Allegany 


1 





1 








16 


7 


Anne Arundel . . 


36 


32 


4 


39 





12 


1 




38 


28 


10 


52 


8 


33 


3 


Calvert 


7 


6 


1 


21 


4 


12 


5 


Caroline 


14 


11 


3 


73 


3 


33 


3 


Carroll 




1 





14 


3 








Cecil 


7 


2 


5 


25 





55 


6 


Charles 


22 


15 


7 


39 


5 


35 





Dorchester .... 


21 


16 


5 


55 


2 


33 


3 


Frederick 


5 


4 




23 


5 


9 


1 


Garrett 
















Harford 


io 


7 


3 


35 


6 


20 


6 




11 


8 


3 


50 





33 


3 


Kent 


12 


7 


5 


50 





45 


5 


Montgomery. . . 


24 


16 


8 


38 


1 


33 


3 


Prince George's 


41 


26 


15 


27 


7 


36 


6 


Queen Anne's. . 


12 


10 


2 


62 


5 


20 





St. Mary's 


7 


6 


1 


28 


6 


11 


1 


Somerset 


12 


7 


5 


28 





26 


3 


Talbot 


9 


7 


2 


33 


3 


13 


3 


Washington . . . 


4 


3 


1 


75 





16 


7 




22 


17 


5 


56 


7 


27 


8 




15 


7 


8 


30 


4 


50 






Total 

Morgan State College 

Hampton Institute 

Temple University 

University of Pennsylvania 

Columbia University 

Catholic University 

Howard University 

New York University 

Virginia State College 

Cornell University 

Boston University 

University of Pittsburgh 

Bluefield Teachers College 

Ag. and Tech. College of N. Caro 
Twenty-seven Others 



236 


95 


98 


7 


46 


13 


19 


15 


11 


13 


8 


11 


11 


4 


7 


2 


3 


4 


3 


4 





5 


2 


2 


3 





2 


1 


1 


2 


22 


12 



94 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 64— Number of Certificates Issued to White and Colored Teachers, 
Principals, Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by 
the Maryland State Department of Education: 1945-46, 1946-47, 1947-48 



Number of Certificates Issued 



Grade of Certificate 


1945-46 


1946-47 


1947-48 


Total Number of Certificates Issued 


1,135 


1,327 


1,459 


Administration and Supervision 










3 


7 


4 


High School Supervision 






11 




6 


9 


8 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 






3 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 






2 


Supervision of Special Subjects (High School) 


i 


i 


7 


Supervision of Special Subjects (Elem. School) 


2 












7 


Attendance Officer 




3 




Helping Teacher 


3 


1 








3 


8 


TT* — T- C~"L. 1 

High bchool 








Principal 


9 


13 


18 




182 


210 


269 


Special 


84 


112 


189 


Vocational 


31 


28 


40 








4 


Non-public 


42 


43 


54 


Elementary 








Principal 


16 


8 


17 




213 


293 


295 


Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 


1 


5 


7 


Advanced First Grade 


10 


6 


21 


First Grade 






1 




i 


'i 


14 


Non-public Advanced First Grade 








Non-public First Grade 


i 






War Emergency Certificates 








Degree 








High School Teaching 


166 


202 


162 




86 


107 


101 


Non-Degree 






14 


High School Teaching 


28 


31 




137 


162 


137 


Provisional Certificates 


11 


6 


11 


Substitute Teachers' Certificates 








Degree 


20 


9 


11 




82 


67 


44 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



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\ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 71 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers New to Maryland County Schools 





New to Counties 






Number New 


to County Who 


Were 










Change 
in 

Number 






Experienced 


Year 


Number 


Per Cent 


of 
Teach- 
ing Posi- 
tions 
October 

to 

October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But 

New 

to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
An- 
other 
County* 


From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County* 


Otherf 



White Elementary School Teachers 



1938-39 


195 


7.2 


-20 


107 


25 


22 


41 


18 


7 




1939-40 


199 


7.4 


-17 


106 


26 


18 


49 


18 


4 




1940-41 


205 


7.6 


-5 


127 


20 


29 


29 


19 


10 




1941-42 


355 


13.4 


-38 


142 


67 


63 


83 


31 


4 




1942-43 


565 


21.3 


+8 


272 




169 


124 


54 


5 




1943-44 


521 


19.4 


+ 42 


165 


io 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944-45 


553 


20.1 


+ 67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46 


621 


22.7 


-52 


159 


85 


219 . 


157 


°50 


12 


47 


1946-47 


712 


25.3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


°57 


15 


41 


1947-48 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


x59 


20 


32 



White High School Teachers 



1938-39 


220 


13 


2 


+ 82 


144 


23 


37 


16 


25 


13 




1939-40 


242 


13 


9 


+72 


156 


31 


38 


17 


19 


13 




1940-41 


262 


14 


7 


+45 


173 


12 


44 


33 


20 


7 




1941-42 


421 


22 


6 


+73 


233 


26 


111 


51 


25 


30 




1942-43 


587 


32 


2 


-19 


270 




237 


80 


61 


21 




1943-44 


517 


28 


7 


-55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


10 


1944-45 


525 


29 





+ 14 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46 


779 


37 





+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946-47 


763 


33 


4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


J57 
1/38 


53 


28 


1947-48 


675 


26 


7 


+ 239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


43 


15 


Colored Elementary School Teachers 


1938-39 


50 


7 


6 


-18 


40 


1 


4 


5 


25 






1939-40 


57 


8 


9 


-17 


42 


1 


3 


11 


22 






1940-41 


41 


6 


5 


-14 


30 


2 


2 


7 


7 






1941-42 


59 


9 


8 


-24 


37 


8 


5 


9 


5 


i 




1942-43 


87 


14 


7 


-9 


65 




9 


13 


9 






1943-44 


120 


20 


3 


-6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




5 


1944-45 


132 


22 


3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46 


108 


18 


2 


-10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


i 


4 


1946-47 


104 


17 





+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


5 


1 


1947-48 


71 


11 


7 


— 5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 



Colored High School Teachers 



1938-39 


35 


23 


6 


+ 14 


27 


1 


5 


2 


8 






1939-40 


35 


20 


8 


+20 


29 


2 


3 


1 


10 


4 




1940-41 


42 


24 


1 


+ 12 


32 


2 


7 


1 


6 






1941-42 


38 


19 


9 


+ 11 


27 




7 


4 


3 


4 




1942-43 


65 


32 


8 


+ 5 


49 




10 


6 


11 


2 




1943-44 


79 


37 


4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 


i 


1944-45 


90 


43 


1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46 


96 


37 





+ 43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


°12 


ii 




1946-47 


104 


35 


3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


10 


i 


1947-48 


110 


32 


3 


+ 46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 





* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per cent 

One transfer from Baltimore City is included in the total number and per cent. 
X Three transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent, 
x Four transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 
y Two transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent. 



102 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 72 



Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of 
Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year, 1947-48 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Per Cent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 8. 
County g 

CD 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County* 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
| During Year* 


Total Counties 




























and Average .... 


t586 


U9 


6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 




154 


J59 




20 


32 




31 


11 


6 


+21 


8 


1 


4 




13 


x5 




8 


4 


Anne Arundel 


54 


27 


5 


+ 14 


17 


4 


16 




12 


yy5 




1 


5 




118 


23 


1 


+41 


24 


37 


25 




23 


xy9 




1 


2 


Calvert 


7 


29 


2 


+2 






5 






2 










7 


16 


7 


+4 






3 




"a 










Carroll 


20 


18 


2 


+ 2 


ii 


i 


2 




2 


4 






i 


Cecil 


14 


17 


5 


+4 


1 


3 


3 




6 


1 






2 


Charles 


14 


32 


5 


+ 1 


2 


1 


6 




5 










Dorchester 


10 


15 


9 


+3 


2 


1 


1 




4 


"2 




1 




Frederick 


22 


15 


9 


-6 


2 


3 


8 




5 


4 










22 


20 


9 


+ 1 


2 


1 


12 




6 


1 




2 






24 


20 


7 


+4 


9 




7 




7 


1 




2 


"l 




15 


27 


3 


+4 


1 




10 




2 


y2 






1 


Kent 


4 


12 


1 


-1 






1 




3 










Montgomery 


127 


34 


9 


+ 56 


21 




68 




21 


xii 




2 


6 


Prince George's .... 


88 


25 


6 


+20 


16 




58 




11 


3 




2 


7 


Queen Anne's 


3 


8 


1 


+2 










3 






1 




St. Mary's 


14 


38 


9 





i 




io 




2 












4 


10 


5 





1 




1 




2 








i 


Talbot 


3 


7 


7 


+ 1 


2 




















26 


11 


3 


+ 4 


7 




3 




i3 


3 






i 


Wicomico 


7 


8 


9 


+2 






1 




4 


2 








Worcester 


7 


15 


2 


+2 




i 






6 











Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 
* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Excludes transfers within and between counties, and withdrawals during the year, but includes transfers from 
Baltimore City. 

X Transfers between counties are excluded from grand total, but the four transfers from Baltimore City are included, 
x Includes one who transferred from the Frostburg State Teachers College elementary school. 
y Includes one transfer from Baltimore City. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 73 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School 
Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the 

School Year 1947-48 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Per Cent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 
State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


•a 

From Another 3. 
County § 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County* 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Year* 


Total Counties 




























and Average .... 


t675 


t26 


7 


+239 


259 


22 


280 




112 


J38 




43 


15 


Allegany 


51 


20 


9 


+ 12 


15 




30 




6 








1 


Anne Arundel 


61 


36 


7 


+23 


26 




23 




11 


i 




7 


3 


Baltimore 


96 


30 


7 


+ 50 


39 


i 


25 




14 


zll 




8 


1 


Calvert 


8 


40 





+ 4 


3 




4 






1 








Caroline 


15 


30 








4 




8 




2 


1 








Carroll 


27 


22 


9 


+ 6 


14 




6 




3 


x4 




2 




Cecil 


25 


30 


9 


+ 8 


5 




15 




4 


1 




1 




Charles 


14 


31 


1 


+ 6 


4 




4 




5 


1 




1 




Dorchester 


19 


32 


2 


+4 


13 


i 


2 




3 






2 




Frederick 


36 


25 


3 


+ 17 


4 


7 


22 




2 






9 




Garrett 


14 


24 


6 


+7 


6 




8 
















31 


27 


9 


+ 8 


17 


i 


9 




2 


2 




i 




Howard 


25 


46 


3 


+ 5 


11 


2 


8 




4 










Kent 


8 


24 


2 


+7 


3 




3 




1 


i 




i 


i 


Montgomery 


76 


25 


8 


+27 


25 


i 


30 




15 


5 




2 


4 


Prince George's. . . . 


95 


33 


1 


+29 


27 


l 


47 




18 


2 




8 


1 


Queen Anne's 


12 


35 


3 


+3 


4 




3 




4 


1 








St. Mary's 


12 


44 


4 


+2 


4 


i 


6 






1 








Somerset 


9 


23 


7 





4 




3 




i 


1 








Talbot 


16 


40 





+ 3 


6 




8 




1 


1 








Washington 


38 


17 


9 


+9 


15 




7 




14 


2 






"2 


Wicomico 


9 


16 


4 


+ 2 


4 




4 




1 










Worcester 


14 


28 


6 


+7 


6 


i 


5 




1 


i 




i 


i 



Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 
* Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Excludes transfers within and between counties, and withdrawals during the year, but includes transfers from 
Baltimore City. 

X Transfers between counties are excluded from grand total, but the two transfers from Baltimore City are included. 
x Includes one transfer from Baltimore City. 



104 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 74 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual 
County of Maryland During the School Year 1947-48 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 








Change 
in 






Experienced 


County 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 


But New to 

State 


In Counties 
But Not 
Teaching Pre- 
ceding Year 


From Another 
County 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County* 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Year* 



Colored Elementary School Teachers 



Total Counties 






















and Average .... 


m 


til. 7 


-5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


16 


3 


6 


Allegany 





0.0 



















Anne Arundel 


5 


6.1 


—2 


3 




i 


i 








Baltimore 


2 


3.8 


-2 


2 














Calvert 


6 


21.4 





5 




i 










Caroline 


3 


20.0 





3 














Carroll 


1 


14.3 













i 






Cecil 





0.0 


-1 
















Charles 


14 


36.8 


+ 3 


io 


2 


i 


i 








Dorchester 


4 


13.8 





3 






l 








Frederick 


2 


11.8 





1 


i 


































Harford 





0.6 


-i 


















2 


12.5 

















i 


Kent 


1 


7.1 


-1 










i 




l 


Montgomery 


2 


4.8 











2 








Prince George's .... 


14 


14.9 


+1 






5 


3 


2 




"i 


Queen Anne's 


1 


6.3 


-1 










1 






St. Mary's 


2 


9.5 


-1 








i 


1 




2 


Somerset 


9 


36.0 





8 






l 






l 


Talbot 


5 


23.8 





5 














Washington 





0.0 



















Wicomico 


1 


3.3 





i 














Worcester 


3 


13.0 





3 















Colored High School Teachers 



Total Counties 






















and Average .... 


tuo 


f32.3 


+ 46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


J4 


10 






2 


33.3 









2 










Anne Arundel 


8 


24.2 


+2 


4 




2 


2 








Baltimore 


10 


33.3 


+ 6 


6 






1 








Calvert 


2 


25.0 





1 




i 










Caroline 


4 


44.4 


+ 1 


2 




1 










Carroll 


2 


28.6 


+ 1 


1 




1 










Cecil 


2 


22.2 


+2 






1 


i 








Charles 


6 


30.0 


+ 2 


3 




1 


1 








Dorchester 


5 


33.3 


+ 1 


2 




2 


1 








Frederick 


2 


18.2 





2 














Garrett 
























*4 


26.7 


+i 


A 














Howard 


4 


44.4 


+2 


3 




i 










Kent 


4 


36.4 


+ 4 


1 




2 






i 






12 


50.0 


+ 5 


6 




4 


'2 








Prince George's .... 


14 


34.1 


+ 10 


6 




7 


1 




'3 




Queen Anne's 


3 


30.0 


+3 


2 






1 




1 




St. Mary's 


2 


22.2 





2 










1 






8 


42.1 


+2 


8 










1 




Talbot 


5 


33.3 


+ 1 


3 




i 


i 








Washington 





0.0 





















9 


50.0 


+2 


6 




'2 


i 








Worcester 


6 


37.5 


+ 1 


3 




1 


2 









Note: Data for Baltimore City were not available. 
* Excluded from all totals in column one and two. 

t Excludes transfers within and between counties and withdrawals during the year who returned before the 

the year. 
% Excluded from grand total. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 75 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools; Number of Principals and Teachers, Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 













General Supervisors by Type of 
School 








Principals 


Total 












Other 


Pupil 


County 


and 




Super- 


Elementary 






Super- 


Personnel 




Teachers 


visors 








High 


visorsf 














White 


Colored 










Total State 


10,160 


3 


168 


8 


50 


8 


17.9 


23 


6 


76.5 


81.0 


Baltimore City 


3,692 


9 


59 


1 


8 





4.0 


2 





45.1 


43.0 


Total Counties 


6,467 


4 


109 


7 


42 


8 


13.9 


21 


6 


31.4 


38.0 


Allegany 


518 


9 


9 


3 


4 





X 




5 


4.8 


3.8 


Anne Arundel .... 


477 


4 


6 


2 


2 


9 


1.0 


1 





1.3 


3.0 




904 


5 


14 





4 


5 


.8 


1 


7 


7.0 


4.0 


Calvert 


79 


7 


2 







5 


.8 




7 




1.0 




116 


2 


2 


4 


1 





.4 


1 







1.0 


Carroll 


241 


1 


4 


2 


2 





.2 





1.0 


2.0 


Cecil 


178 


9 


3 


1 


1 


8 


.1 







.2 


1.0 


Charles 


147 


4 


2 


5 


1 





1.0 




5 




1.0 


Dorchester 


166 

306 





3 








1.0 


1 







1.0 


Frederick 


8 


5 


7 


2 


5 


.5 


1 


5 


1.2 


1.0 


Garrett 


160 


6 




6 


1 


6 










1.0 




263 






2 


2 





.7 


1 


5 




1.8 


Howard 


133 


! 


i 


3 


1 





.5 




6 


.2 


1.0 


Kent 


89 


6 




5 


1 





.5 


1 







1.0 


Montgomery 


719 


2 


13 





4 





1.0 


2 





6.0 


4.0 


Prince George's . . . 


765 


3 


13 


5 


3 





1.5 


2 





7.0 


3.7 


Queen Anne's 


97 





2 


5 


1 





.5 


1 







.5 


St. Mary's 


95 


6 


2 


2 


1 





.7 


3 


.2 


1.0 


Somerset 


119 


9 


2 


3 


1 





.5 




8 




.2 


Talbot 


116 


5 


2 


5 


1 





.5 


1 







1.0 




456 





6 





3 





: 




5 


2.5 


2.0 


Wicomico 


181 


* 


3 





1 





1.0 


1 







1.0 


Worcester 


132 


2 


1 


7 


1 





.7 






1.0 























* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, English, Guidance, Handwriting, Health and 
Physical Education, History, Home Economics, Instruction, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, and Special 
Education. 

X Less than . 1 of one supervisor's load. 



106 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 76 



Number of Clerks Employed in Maryland County Schools, 1947-48 



County 


Number 


of 


Total 


Average Annual 




Clerks 


Salaries 


Salary 


Total and Average 


164 


7 


$193,031.50 


$1,172.02 


Allegany 


9 





11,282.80 


1,253.64 


Anne Arundel 


20 





19,965.14 


998.26 


Baltimore 


25 





31,382.73 


1,255.31 


Calvert 


3 





2,191.81 


730.60 




5 





1,205.65 


241.13 


Carroll 


2 





2,180.00 


1,090.00 


Cecil 










Charles 


2 


6 


2,724.99 


1,362.50 


Dorchester 


1 





648.00 


648.00 


Frederick 


11 


5 


10,711.32 


931.42 












Harford 


3 


6 


2,725.00 


908.33 


Howard 


4 





1,024.80 


256.20 


Kent 





1 


160.38 


1,603.80 


Montgomery 


25 


5 


55,867.64 


2,190.89 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


33 





30,400.24 


921.22 










St. Mary's 


i 


6 


2,392.00 


2,392.00 


Somerset 










Talbot 












12 





12,790.48 


1,065.87 




4 


6 


4,121.52 


895.98 


Worcester 


3 





1,257.00 


419.00 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 77 — Repair or Utility Men and Janitors, Engineers, Firemen, etc. in 
Maryland Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Repair or Utility Men 



Janitors, Cleaners, Firemen, Etc. 



County 


Total 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Tota' 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 


Total State 


261 


190 


71 


1,358 


806 


552 


379 


179 


200 


Baltimore City . . 


136 


136 




588 


305 


283 


202 


106 


96 


Total Counties . . 


125 


54 


71 


770 


501 


269 


177 


73 


104 


Allegany 


1 


1 




78 


63 


15 


2 


1 


1 


Anne Arundel . 


15 


13 


2 


53 


30 


23 


39 


3 


36 


Baltimore 


5 


4 


1 


110 


61 


49 


18 


6 


12 


Calvert 


1 


1 




7 


4 


3 


3 


1 


2 


Caroline 


1 


1 




13 


6 


7 


4 




4 


Carroll 


2 


1 




20 


16 


4 


1 


i 




Cecil 


1 


1 




20 


11 


9 


3 


2 


i 


Charles 








8 


7 


1 


3 


3 




Dorchester .... 


'2 


2 




19 


16 


3 


4 


4 




Frederick 


1 


1 




41 


21 


20 


8 


1 


'7 


Garrett 








50 


18 


32 










'4 


4 




37 


17 


20 


io 


'2 


8 




1 


1 




15 


9 


6 


8 


1 


7 


Kent 


1 


1 




12 


7 


5 


2 


1 


1 


Montgomery . . 


12 


12 




99 


85 


14 


12 


1 


11 


Prince George's 








72 


59 


13 


41 


37 


4 


Queen Anne's . 








13 


9 


4 


1 


1 




St. Mary's. . . . 








3 


2 


1 


2 




2 


Somerset 








10 


10 




4 


4 




Talbot 








9 


9 




3 


1 


2 


Washington . . . 


78 


ii 




55 


26 


29 


1 


1 




Wicomico 








15 


10 


5 


2 


1 




Worcester 








11 


5 


6 


6 


1 


5 



108 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 78 — Average Number Belonging per Maryland Teacher and Principal for 

Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Average Number Belonging Per Teacher and Principal 



Pattxttv 


White 
High 
Schools 


White Elementary Schools* 


Colored 


Schools 


One- 
teacher 


Two- 
teacher 


Three- 
teacher 


Graded 


All Ele- 
mentary 


High 


Ele- 
mentary* 


State Average 


21 


5 














34 


4 


33 


9 


23 


6 


34 


9 


Baltimore City 


21 


2 














34 





34 





24 


1 


34 


3 


County Average 


21 


6 


21 


5 


28 


1 


32 


3 


34 


7 


33 


9 


23 


1 


35 


6 


Allegany 


24 


5 


22 





28 


3 


31 


3 


32 


7 


32 


5 


14 


9 


37 


1 


Anne Arundel 


21 


7 






25 


3 


33 


7 


37 


3 


36 


9 


25 


4 


34 


9 


Baltimore 


26 


7 






|30 





35 


3 


38 


1 


38 





24 


5 


47 


4 


Calvert 


20 









25 


3 


t35 


3 


30 


2 


30 





28 


3 


37 


6 


Caroline 


18 


3 






29 


2 




35 


6 


34 


9 


21 


4 


39 


8 


Carroll 


19 


7 






24 


3 






34 


3 


34 





16 


3 


35 


7 


Cecil 


20 


7 


30 


3 


35 


4 






32 


3 


32 


5 


20 


4 


35 


1 


Charles 


17 


6 






t20 









34 





33 


6 


19 


5 


37 


2 


Dorchester 


19 


1 


i7 


5 


25 


9 






34 


1 


28 


8 


24 


5 


34 


3 


Frederick 


21 


6 


t20 





28 





34 


9 


38 


7 


37 


5 


22 


2 


35 


6 


Garrett 


20 


7 


19 


9 


34 


3 


29 


9 


37 


3 


31 


9 










Harford 


19 


3 


27 


4 


22 


9 


t30 


7 


36 


7 


34 


7 


25 


6 


32 


7 


Howard 


17 


8 


19 


5 


t29 


3 




34 


5 


33 


9 


26 


4 


35 


1 


Kent 


18 


3 


tl8 





24 


4 


129 





31 


2 


28 


7 


21 


5 


32 


6 


Montgomery 


18 


8 


f20 





29 


3 


33 





30 


7 


30 


7 


22 


5 


34 


7 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


21 


7 


21 


5 


31 


4 


28 


3 


34 


1 


33 


8 


24 


4 


31 


9 


18 


2 


19 





27 


5 


29 





33 


1 


30 


7 


20 


5 


28 


8 


St. Mary's 


21 


1 


23 


8 


23 


2 






t31 


3 


27 





23 


1 


29 


7 


Somerset 


19 


5 


26 


3 


26 


8 






34 


8 


33 


3 


22 


5 


36 


9 


Talbot 


19 


2 


tl9 





24 


7 


f27 


6 


33 





31 


6 


21 


2 


31 


9 


Washington 


22 


9 


22 


5 


31 


2 


36 





32 


7 


32 


5 


19 


2 


t42 


8 


Wicomico 


20 


8 


27 





29 





33 





36 


8 


35 


9 


21 


4 


35 


4 


Worcester 


18 


6 






23 





32 





33 


5 


32 





29 





38 






* Excludes pupils going to elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
For basic data by county, see TABLES VI and X. 
t One school only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



TABLE 79 

Average Number of Pupils Belonging per County Teacher and Principal: 1939-1948 



Average Number Belonging Per Teacher and Principal 



Year Ending 


White 


Colored 


June 30 












Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1939 


35.6 


24.2 


34.9 


28.0 


1940 


35.5 


24.5 


35.3 


27.5 


1941 


35.8 


24.1 


35.8 


27.2 


1942 


36.0 


23.3 


36.3 


25.5 


1943 


36.8 


23.0 


36.3 


25.4 


1944 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 


1945 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 


1946 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 


1947 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1948 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 80 

Average Annual Salary Per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1948 



School Year 



White 



Elementary 



High 



Colored 



Elementary 



1923 
1928 
1933 
1938 

1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 

1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 



$990 
1,155 
1,231 
1,295 

1,314 
1,360 
1,387 
1,427 
1,539 

1,805 
1,862 
2,027 
2,306 
3,234 



$1,436 
1,544 
1,532 
1,587 

1,595 
1,605 
1,618 
1,639 
1,735 

1,997 
2,042 
2,183 
2,439 
3,446 



$513 
602 
657 
745 



906 
993 
1,124 
1,291 

1,551 
1,599 
1,737 
2,002 
3,157 



110 



8" 
I 

S 
1 



"3 

i 

I 
i 

! 

! 

i 

! 

I 
I 



1 

J 

1 

1 


1 


ii 


I i 1 11=11 lisp, ji 


1111 lllll 111 


1- 


s § i mm isj.ii =i 


ill! lllll 111 


Teach- 
er 
Prin- 
cipal 


| § i Plli. lllll ji 


111! Pl|l 151 


t 


Prin- 
cipal 


| g 1 .gp_| .ii^ , 

CO ^ CO CO-#COCO CO<MCO 


-III 11-11 -11 


h 

Eh 


1 1 S IISII lllll ji 


1111 mil ill 


Teach- 
er 
Prin- 
cipal 


i i i iisii mm ji 


6 ,1)00 

2,545 
2,860 
3 691 

2,680 
2,823 
2,506 
2,461 
2,574 

3,058 
2,725 
2,465 


Total Colored 1 


ii 


i § i nm mm w 


1.1.11 lllll 111. 


i* 


S | 1 IISJ1. qSIll ji 


1111 1I1IS HI 


Teach- 
er 
Prin- 
cipal 


S. 5 1 SUP. P»gS ji 


1111 11111 111 


Schools for White Ptxpils 


1 


Prin- 
cipal 


s I i mis psis Htu p.iii |i§ 




I 1 I PJjt! |fl|i IliSS. SSSJi III 


Hi 


1 1. i isigg. mm iisii um iii 


I 


Prin- 
cipal 


§ 1 1 mm mm lint iu.u. lie 




1 1 § mm mm P.1.11 itm hi 


Hi 


1 1 s. PISS lljll $MM ilili ill 


Total White 




1 1 1 iiui iiiji sisii msi m 


h 


i i § iiiii mm ilili 5P.il in 


Teach- 
er 
Prin- 
cipal 


I 1 1 |I3tl. SIIII 1=111 HIP. 111 


i 


Prin- 
cipal 


1 1 5 lisp, nit! ra sips p.i 


t.. 


1 s i sp.si pin. (hk ijtijB pi 


Teach- 
er r 
Prin- 
cipal 


1 § S IIJI1 lllll §§131 ill 


1 
I 


Prin- 
cipal 


1 1 1 lllll lllll 1111! lllll III 

CO CO CO CO CO COCOCOCOCO COCOCOCO-* coco-<t>coco -*> CO CO 


h 


I l 1 lllll llip. Hill Ill 


h 


i i i iiiii iiiii iiiii iiiii iii 


'1 




1 1 § nisi iiiii iiiii iiiii in. 


■ 

h 


1 1 I lllll lllll Is 


till 111.11 HI 


, each- 

er 1 
Prin- 
cipal 


1 1. § mil iiiii uiii iiiii in 


1 


otal State , , i 
altimore City . . 
'otal Counties . . . 

Anne Arundel . 
Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 


Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester .... 



! 

s 
I 

1 
I 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



TABLE 82 — Number of Maryland County White and Colored Elementary Schools bj 
County — Number of Teachers and Principals: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Number 






del 


























b 


rge's 


01 








a 






of 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 


TOTAL 


Allegany 


Anne Arun 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgome 


Prince Geo 


Queen Ann 


St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washingto: 


o 
w 

1 


V 


Worcester 



County Elementary Schools for White Pupils 



All Schools . . . 


a501 


35 


27 


a43 


6 


9 


17 


17 


7 


26 


29 


46 


28 


10 


10 


36 


44 


13 


13 


10 


9 


41 


15 


10 


1.0- 1.4 


93 


°*4 


*1 






*1 


0*3 


4 


*1 


tl5 


°* 4 


26 


8 


2 


*2 


*2 


*f4 


°5 


4 


3 


*2 


*5 


2 




1.5- 2 .4 


79 


3 


1 


t2 


2 


2 




t5 




6 


4 


8 


5 


1 


4 


4 


t4 


t2 


8 


2 


1 


10 


2 


*3 


2.5- 3.4. . . . 


32 


1 


5 


2 


1 










4 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 






1 


2 


2 


3 


3.5- 4.4 


50 


3 


2 


5 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


5 


5 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 






3 


6 


2 




4.5- 5.4 


29 




3 


2 


1 


1 


1 




2 




2 




3 






2 


4 


1 






1 


3 


1 


i 


5.5- 6.4 


39 


5 


3 


4 




3 


3 


2 


2 


i 


3 


i 




i 




3 


1 






1 




3 


2 


i 


6.5- 7.4. . . . 


31 


3 


1 


4 






3 






1 


3 




6 


2 


i 




5 










2 






7.5- 8.4 


22 


4 




2 






1 










2 


1 


1 




i 


5 






2 




2 




i 


8.5- 9.4. .. . 


17 


4 






i 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 




i 


2 


3 


i 














9.5-10.4. . . . 


25 




6 


5 




i 


2 






1 












1 

3 


4 










3 


2 




10.5-11.4. . . . 


11 




2 


1 








i 






1 










1 












2 




11.5-12.4 


13 
9 


i 


1 


4 














1 








2 


2 










1 




i 


12.5-13.4 


2 


2 








l 






1 








2 














13.5-14.4. . . . 


9 


2 




1 












1 




1 








3 










1 






14.5-15.4 


3 






























2 










i 








15.5-16.4. . . . 


7 


1 














1 














2 


3 














16.5-17.4 


8 


1 




2 








l 












1 




1 


1 




1 












17.5-18.4 


5 




























2 


1 










2 






18.5-19.4 


1 












1 


































20 . 5 or more . 


13 


1 


1 


7 
























3 





































































County Elementary Schools for Colored Pupils 



All Schools . . . 


256 


2 


32 


16 


16 


4 


4 


4 


19 


11 


8 




10 


8 


6 


19 


34 


12 


14 


8 


9 


1 


11 


8 


1.0- 1.4 

1.5- 2.4. . . . 
2.5- 3.4 


90 
95 
31 


1 

i 


*7 
17 
3 


2 
9 


9 
4 
1 


2 


2 
1 
1 


1 

2 
1 


9 

5 
3 


*7 
1 
1 


3 
4 




4 
4 
1 


2 
4 
2 


3 
1 
1 


4 
10 

3 


7 
14 

8 


10 
1 


9 
3 
1 


5 




6 
1 




4 
4 

2 


5 


3.5- 4.4. . . . 
4.5- 5.4 


16 
10 
6 


2 
1 


1 

2 


2 


1 
1 








1 








1 
1 


2 
1 


i 


1 


1 
1 




1 




2 
1 


5.5- 6.4 




1 












1 




i 








i 




1 






1 








6.5- 7.4. . . . 
7.5- 8.4. . . . 








1 










1 


























10.5-11.4. . . . 


















































11.5-12.4. . . . 
12.5-13.4. . . . 






1 


1 












1 


























1 




16.5-17.4. . . . 


































1 

































































a Includes 23 seventh grades which are housed in elementary schools but offer a junior high school 
curriculum. 

* Includes one school having a two-teacher organization. 
° Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization, 
f Includes one school having a graded organization. 



112 Eighty-Second Annual Report 

TABLE 83 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in County One-Teacher Schools * 1939-1948 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year 
Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1939 


2,946 


260 


8.8 


658 


232 


35.3 


1940 


2,944 


209 


7.1 


644 


198 


30.7 


1941 


2,921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 




15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 84— Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties: Year Ending June 30, 1948 





Schools for White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


County 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total and Average 


77 


2 


6 


1,659 
22 


1 


6 


84 


13 


7 


2,544 


11.7 


Allegany 


1 





4 





3 


1 


24 


4 


25 


16.4 


Anne Arundel 












6 


7 


3 


201 


7.0 


Baltimore 














2 


3 


7 


85 


3.3 


Calvert 
















32 


7 


340 


32.9 


Caroline 












! 


: 








Carroll 
















28 


6 


45 


18 ".6 


Cecil 


4 


4 


8 


120 


4 


5 


l 


12 


5 


20 


7.1 


Charles 












9 


22 





334 


22.3 


Dorchester 


u 


22 


2 


245 


13 


5 


6 


20 


7 


165 


16.6 


Frederick 


1 





7 


20 





4 


3 


17 


6 


87 


14.4 


Garrett 


26 


24 
6 


8 


518 


15 


5 












Harford 


8 


8 
6 


219 


5 


4 


4 


20 


6 


107 


16.4, 


Howard 


2 


3 


40 


2 


1 


2 


12 


5 


56 


10.0 


Kent 


1 


3 





18 


1 


9 


3 


21 


4 


85 


18.6 


Montgomery 


1 





3 


20 





2 


4 


9 


6 


131 


9.0 


Prince George's 


2 





6 


43 





4 


7 


7 


3 


200 


6.6 


Queen Anne's 


3 


8 


1 


57 


5 





10 


62 


5 


262 


57.0 


St. Mary's 


4 


10 


8 


95 


9 


5 


9 


41 


5 


250 


38.8 


Somerset 


3 


7 


9 


79 


6 


2 












Talbot 


1 


2 


6 


19 


1 


5 


2 


9 


i 


58 


8.3 


Washington 


4 


1 


7 


90 


1 


2 












Wicomico 


2 


2 


5 


54 


1 


9 


4 


13 


3 


93 


8^8 


Worcester 















































* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



TABLE 85 — Number of Maryland County White Junior-Senior and Senior High 
Schools and White Junior High Schools by County — Number of Teachers: 
Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Number 
of 

Teachers 


All Schools 


Allegany 


| Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 


! Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


| Montgomery 


| Prince George's 


| Queen Anne's 


| St. Mary's 


Somerset 


| Talbot 


| Washington || 


| Wicomico jj 


| Worcaster 


Grand Total . . 


*159 


11 


11 


13 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


6 


8 


4 


4 


12 


15 


3 


2 


5 


3 


9 


6 


4 


County Junior-Senior and Senior High Schools 




Total 


121 

3 
3 
7 
1 
5 

10 
5 
3 
6 
5 
7 
7 
5 
8 
8 
2 
2 
3 

31 


8 


4 


7 


1 


5 


8 


7 


3 


6 

1 
1 
1 


6 


5 


8 


4 


4 


7 


10 


3 


2 


4 


3 


6 


6 

1 
1 

3 


4 


2 


3 






















1 


















4 






























2 


1 




5 
















1 




















6 


1 
1 








1 
1 






1 










1 
1 


















1 


7 


1 








3 
1 


1 




1 

2 


1 




















8 






1 














9 


i 


1 








1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 






















10 














1 


1 










1 














11 








1 










2 




1 
1 
















12 










1 
1 










2 












1 
1 




1 

i 
i 


13 










1 
1 




1 










1 


i 

1 




14 






1 




















15 




1 




1 
1 






1 
1 


'i 


1 


1 

3 
2 


i 






1 




16 
















17 






























18 
























1 
















1 






19 


l 

4 


2 


6 


1 












1 
1 




















20 and over 




1 


1 




1 


1 


2 






4 


4 








1 


2 


1 











County Junior High Schools 



Total 


♦38 

1 

3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 

1 

2 
1 
1 
6 


3 


7 


6 






1 


1 


3 


1 


2 










5 


5 






1 




3 






1 










2 




1 


1 

2 








1 
































3 








1 
1 
































4 






1 


































5 


1 

"i 
i 


1 






















2 
















6 


1 














1 


























7 








































8 


1 


2 










































9 


























1 
















10 




























1 
















11 




1 

2 

1 








































12 














1 






























15 










































17 


























1 


1 
















18 












































• 19 






























1 
















20 and over 






























2 










3 











































* Excludes twenty-three seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a 

junior high school curriculum. 
For teaching staff in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



114 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 86 — Number of Maryland County White Junior-Senior and Senior High 
Schools and White Junior High Schools by County — Average Number Belonging: 
Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Average 
Number 


tools 


>> 


Irundel || 


0) 

<-, 
o 










en 


0) 
1 






T3 


T3 




omery 


George's 


Anne's 


ry's || 






igton 1 


o 
a 


s 


Belonging 


W 


c 
a 
tn 


C 


ltim 


lver 


.s 

"o 
u 


rroll 


'C 


arle 


W 

(4 


'C 
1 


rret 


rfor 


war 


c 


Kltgi 


nee 


C 

I 


3 


1 
£ 


bot 


.5 


£ 



u 


ircea 




< 


< 


a 
< 


S3 

m 


O 


cU 

U 


U 


U 


o 


o 
Q 




C3 

O 


M 


o 








3 




c 






5 


o 


Grand Total . . 


*182 


11 


11 


*36 


1 


5 


9 


8 


6 


7 


8 


5 


8 


4 


4 


12 


15 


3 


2 


5 


3 


9 


6 


4 



County Junior-Senior and Senior High Schools 



Total 




121 


26- 


50 ... . 


3 


51- 


100 


15 


101- 


150 


13 


151- 


200 


18 


201- 


250 


9 


251- 


300 


11 


301- 


350 


17 


351- 


400 


5 


401- 


450 


2 


451- 


500 


1 


501- 


550 


3 


551- 


600 


4 


601- 


650 


1 


651- 


700 


1 


701- 


750 


1 


751- 


800. .. . 


3 


801- 


850 


4 


851- 


900 


1 


901- 


950 


2 


1101- 


1150 


1 


1201- 


1250. . . . 


1 


1301- 


1350 


2 


1351- 


1400 


1 


1451- 


1500. . . . 


1 


1601- 


1650 


1 



10 



County Junior High Schools 



1001-1050. 



*61 



*29 



* Includes twenty-three seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a 

junior high school curriculum. 
For average number belonging in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 87 — Number of Maryland County Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and 
Regular High Schools by County — Number of Teachers and by County — Average 
Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Number of 






% 


























>> 


rge's 


J" 
"a 








c 






Teachers 

Average 
Number 


Schools 


>> 
c 

* 
bt 


ne Arun 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 




arles 


rchester 


lerick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


c 


mtgome 


nee Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


1 
i- 

£ 


Ibot 



bt 
G 

JB 
■ 


comico 


- 

s 


Belonging 


< 


< 


c 
< 


- 


ed 
U 


o 


c« 

U 


o 


s: 


o 
- 


Free 


C9 
O 


a 
X 


o 

a 




s 




c 


v: 


z 
X 








O 


All Schools . . . 


36 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 




2 


i 


1 


1 


6 


1 


2 


2 




1 




3 



Number of Schools by Number of Teachers 



3 


**** 
4 

*2 
1 

*4 
5 

* 4 

4 

2 
2 
1 

3 
1 

1 

2 
































**2 
*1 














** 

2 


4 


































1 










5 
















1 
*1 


























6 


1 
































1 


i 




l 






7 




2 


1 




1 










1 












8 


















*2 














9 








1 




1 


1 








1 




















10 
























1 












1 


11 




















1 








1 
















12 


































i 










15 


















1 














1 






l 








16 










































18 






































i 




Over 20 




1 


























1 

























































Number of Schools by Average Number Belonging 



50- 


100. .. . 


***5 


101- 


150. .. . 


*** 8 


151- 


200 


*9 


201- 


250 


5 


251- 


300 


2 


301- 


350 


2 


351- 


400. . . . 


2 


401- 


450. .. . 


1 


501- 


550... . 


1 


801- 


850 ... . 


1 



*1 

**2 
*2 



* Each asterisk represents one junior high school. 

For teaching staff and average number belonging in individual high schools, see TABLE XXII. 



116 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 88 



Number of Teachers and Enrollment by Subject: Adult Education Classes: 
Counties of Maryland : 1947-48 



County 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Grand Total 


377 


9,170 


863 


2,371 


1,506 


1,054 


3,376 





WHITE ADULTS 



Total Counties 


324 


8,023 


761 


1,980 


1,438 


986 


2,858 


Allegany 


50 


1,438 


406 


465 


286 


93 


188 


Anne Arundel .... 


10 


291 


36 


52 


101 


21 


81 


Baltimore 


64 


1,158 




199 


302 


294 


363 


Calvert 














Caroline 
















Carroll 


6 


171 


16 




24 


5i 


80 


Cecil 
















Charles 
















Dorchester 


9 


336 


109 




30 


30 


167 


Frederick 


3 


165 




50 






115 


Garrett 


2 


34 


22 


12 








Harford 


34 


889 


49 


351 




59 


430 


Howard 


4 


183 


41 








142 


Kent 


10 


186 


32 


32 




39 


83 




67 


1,779 




664 


388 


178 


549 


Prince George's . . . 


35 


660 




97 


68 


149 


346 


Queen Anne's .... 
















St. Mary's 
















Somerset 


3 


47 








i9 


28 


Talbot 


8 


168 




58 




24 


36 




16 


389 






239 




150 


Wicomico 


1 


29 








29 




Worcester 


2 


100 










100 



COLORED ADULTS 



Total Counties 


53 


1,147 


102 


391 


68 


68 


518 


Allegany 


1 


30 




30 




20 




Anne Arundel .... 


7 


179 




52 


ii 


66 


Baltimore 


12 


203 




116 




12 


75 


Calvert 
































Carroll 
















Cecil 


i 


12 










12 


















Dorchester 


2 


64 












Frederick 


1 


20 










20 


Garrett 
















Harford 


i 


51 










16 


Howard ......... 


3 


57 










57 


Kent 


6 


71 




12 






59 


Montgomery 


1 


15 




15 








Prince George's. . . 
















Queen Anne's .... 
















St. Mary's 














12 


Somerset 


4 


58 




34 






Talbot 


4 


117 




46 






71 


Washington 


1 


50 








20 


50 




6 


106 


i9 


32 




35 


Worcester 


3 


114 




54 


i5 




45 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



TABLE 89 — Descriptive Titles of Courses Offered in Maryland County Adult Educa- 
tion Program Under Classifications of Agriculture, Home Economics, Trade and 
Industries, Business Education, and General, 1947-1948 



Title of Course 



Number 

of 
Classes 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Community Canning 

Farm Mechanics 

Farm Machinery and Repairing 

Farm Shop 

Farmstead Construction 

Food Canning 

Food Processing 

Rural Adult Education 

Soil Conservation 

Soil Testing 

Total 

Home Economics 

Child Care 

Clothing Construction 

Family Life Education 

Food Preservation 

Home Crafts 

Home Furnishings 

Home Nursing 

Total 

Trade and Industries 

Arc Welding 

Art Metals 

Auto Mechanics 

Blue Print Reading 

Bricklaying 

C. A. A. Instruction 

Cabinet Work 

Carpentry 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Furniture Repair Renovation . . 

Foremanship 

Home Mechanics 

Home Planning 

Hydraulics 

Machine Shop Practice 

Mathematics 

Motor Control 

Plastics 

Radio 

Related Instruction Classes for 

Apprentices 

Scientific Instruments 

Total 



2 
55 
21 

9 
19 

9 

1 

116 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business English 

Shorthand 

Shorthand and Bookkeeping 

Typing 

Typing and Shorthand 

Typing and Office Procedure 

Total 

General 

Adult Recreation 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Art — Painting 

Arithmetic and English 

Basketball Clinic 

Ceramics 

Child Study 

Community Chorus 

Community Relations 

Conversational Spanish & Spanish. . 

Dramatics 

Driver Training & Safety Education 
English & English Fundamentals. . 

General Education 

Health Training & Phy. Education . 

Health Training for Men 

Health Training for Women 

Industrial Arts 

Jewelry and Gem Cutting 

Journalism 

Leadership Training in Child Study 

Mathematics 

Medical Chemistry for Nurses 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal . . . 

Parent Education 

Photography 

Physics 

Public Speaking 

Reading, Spelling, Arithmetic 

Reading and Writing Fundamentals 
Recreational Leadership 

Total 



105 



118 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 90— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 1947 and 1948 





Enrollment 


Type of Class 


White 


Colored 




1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


Total 


8,237 


17,279 


2,988 


6,347 




363 


465 






Academic 










Elementary 


50 


480 


660 


1,356 


Secondary 


2,998 


7,110 


513 


1,369 


Commercial (Distributive Education) 


873 


2,079 


293 






1,425 


1,116 


1,163 


1,582 




1,192 




563 




Home Economics 


233 




600 




Parent Education 


1,212 


2,674 


359 


928 


Industrial Training 


852 








Informal Program 


464 


416 






Vocational Education (Veterans) 




974 




907 


Veterans Institute 




846 




205 


Foremanship and Apprentice Training 




1,119 







TABLE 91— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1938-1947 and by Type 

of School, 1947 







Total Enrollment 


Net Roll at End of Term 


















Number of 




No. of 












Principals 


Type of School 


Schools 








Taking 


and 






Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Review 


Advance 


Teachers 












Work 


Work 




ALL SCHOOLS 
















1938 


14 


3,299 


2,350 


5,822 


4,917 


905 


128 


1939 


14 


3,644 


3,359 


6,208 


5,505 


703 


121 


1940 


14 


3,641 


3,347 


6,135 


5,370 


765 


127 


1941 


14 


3,261 


3,233 


5,728 


4,987 


741 


120 


1942 


15 


3,597 


3,397 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 


147 


1943 


14 


3,156 


3,201 


5,483 


4,548 


935 


130 


1944 


15 


3,458 


3,416 


5,976 


5,108 


868 


143 


1945 


13 


3,213 


3,252 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1946 


12 


3,461 


3,390 


6,159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


5 


2,092 


1,594 


3,686 


3,134 


552 


86 


WHITE SCHOOLS 


3 


1,725 


1,076 


2,801 


2,503 


298 


61 


Secondary 












1 


1,256 


722 


1,978 


1,886 


92 


38 
13 


Junior 


1 


378 


239 


617 


617 




Demonstration . 


1 


91 


115 


206 




206 


10 


COLORED 














25 


SCHOOLS 


2 


367 


518 


885 


631 


254 


Secondary 
















Senior 




107 


226 


333 


253 


80 




>: 


190 


188 


378 


378 




}» 


Demonstration . 




70 


104 


174 




174 


8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE 92 

Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled* in Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children, Year Ending June 30, 1948 





Enrollment 


Total Num- 
ber of 


Name and Location 


Nursery 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- . 
mentary 


Secondary 


Different 
Teachers 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


Full- 
time 


Part 
time 



White 



Children's Rehabilitation Center, 






















Cockeysville 


2 


3 


6 


5 


34 


19 


3 


3 


6 




Child Study Center, Baltimore 










28 


6 






3 




Eric Bowditch Hospital School, Ruxton . . 










11 


6 




i 


1 


i 


Maryland School for the Blind, Overlea . . 






5 


'4 


31 


25 


14 


10 


15 




Maryland School for the Deaf, Frederick . 






14 


7 


64 


47 


11 


16 


17 




Maryland Training School for Boys, 






















Loch Raven 










388 




46 




6 




Matthews School, Rodgers Forge 


i 


i 


i 


i 


7 


i 






2 


'2 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown . . 












83 




36 


6 




Reinhardt School for Deaf Children, 






















Kensington 


2 


5 


4 


2 


6 


8 






3 




Rosewood State Training School, 




























24 


22 


64 


57 






11 




St. Mary's Industrial School, Baltimore 










256 




25 




12 


*8 


School of the Chimes, Baltimore 






2 


1 


4 


i 






2 


2 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 










9 


11 






3 





Colored 



Cheltenham School for Colored Boys, 






















Cheltenham 










162 




6 




6 




Maryland School for the Blind, Overlea. . 






4 


■7 


12 


6 






5 




Department for Deaf 






5 


4 


17 


20 






6 


2 


Maryland Training School for Colored 






















Girls, Glen Burnie 












86 






5 


8 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



120 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 93 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered During the Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 



COUNTY 


I otal 
Number 
Cases 


Reha- 
bilitated 


• 

Being 
t ollowed 
on Jobs 


• • 

Training 
Completed 


Being 
Prepared 
for Jobs 


Surveyed; 

Being 
Counseled 


Closed — 

Other 
Services 


~ » 1 C!4-r»+-^i 


3,053 


602 


63 


186 


516 


1,340 


346 


Pnlf im/\vA (~* tt 


1,549 


327 


43 


105 


281 


604 


189 


'Prkfcil f" 1 /"in + i 


1,01)4 


275 


zu 


81 


235 


736 


157 


All 


1 I u 


OA 
ZU 


1 
1 


8 


1 < 


84 


40 


Anne Arundel .... 


1 1 


6 


z 


6 


18 


33 


6 


"Rolf imm'fi 


198 


9.0. 


o 


1 A 
14 




QO 


O/t 
Z4 




1 Q 


4 






2 


7 


• • 




OO 


Q 

y 




• • 


4 


14 


2 




A 1 

41 


Z 


z 


1 


1 n 
1U 


OK 

ZO 


1 




56 


11 


2 


3 


6 


OO 


1 




oZ 


8 






5 


1 c 
10 


3 




ou 


Q 
O 




1 
1 


A 
4 


10 


o 

z 




1 4 


Id 


l 


4 


1 a 

iy 


on 
zo 


Q 


Garrett 


53 


10 




2 


5 


26 


10 


Harford 


56 


10 


i 


2 


11 


25 


7 


Howard 


34 


3 


1 




5 


21 


4 


Kent 


24 


1 




3 


3 


16 


1 


Montgomery 


109 


18 




1 


17 


69 


4 


Prince George's . . . 


180 


30 


*4 


11 


20 


98 


17 


Queen Anne's .... 


24 


3 




2 


2 


15 


2 


St. Mary's 


21 


4 




2 


2 


10 


3 


Somerset 


30 


8 




3 


7 


12 




Talbot 


19 


9 






1 


8 


i 


Washington 


124 


29 


i 


5 


20 


53 


16 




86 


25 




11 


19 


28 


3 


Worcester 


30 


8 




2 


8 


11 


1 



Personal Characteristics of Clients Served During Year Ending June, 1948 



Characteristic 


Total 


Reha- 


Otherf 


Characteristic 


Total 


Reha- 


Otherf 






bilitated* 






bilitated* 


Total Number 


3,053 


602 


2,451 


Race 












White 


2,390 


500 


1,890 


Age 








Colored .... 


661 


102 


559 


Under 21 .... 


1,005 


156 


849 


Other 


2 




2 


21-30 


754 


186 


568 










31-40 


578 


126 


452 


Sex 








41-50 


392 


74 


318 


Male 


2,144 


439 


1,705 


Over 50 


324 


60 


264 


Female .... 


909 


163 


746 


Education 








Marital Status 










70 


8 


62 


Single 


1,732 


308 


1,424 


1-3 


208 


38 


170 


Married . . . 


1,013 


241 


772 


4-6 


576 


96 


480 


Other 


308 


53 


255 


7-9 


1,067 


208 


859 






10-12 


720 


147 


573 


Employment 








H.S. Graduate 


285 


75 


210 


History (At 








13-14 


85 


23 


62 


time of sur- 








15-16 


21 


5 


16 


vey) 








College 


21 


2 


19 


Employed. . 


360 


124 


236 








Unemployed 


2,693 






Dependents 








Never 











1,907 


336 


1,571 


worked . . 




87 


722 


1 


438 


100 


338 


Worked at 








2 


281 


70 


211 


some time 




391 


1,493 


3 


186 


52 


134 










4 


99 


17 


82 


Number on 








5 


56 


9 


47 


Welfare (At 








Over 5 


86 


18 


68 


time of sur- 
















vey) 


268 


35 


233 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (602). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (2,451). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



TABLE 94 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 



Type of Service 


Total 


Number 


AvGragG 




Expenditure 


of Clients 


Cost 


TnTAT, 155 YP'P.Mr»TTTT'RT^ 


<p J. o iy , u *± £j • x o 






Examinations (Diagnosis) 








Medical 


7,814.43 


853 


$9.16 


Psychiatric 


999 ^0 
. . ■ 1 


17 


13.09 


Treatment 








Medical 


255.41 


7 


36.49 


Psychiatric 


22CL0O 


5 


44.00 


Surgical 


4 050.00 


42 


96 43 


Dental 


235.00 


3 


78i33 


Prosthetic Appliances 








Artificial limb(s) 


10,525.50 


61 


172.55 


Hearing aids 


4,081.87 


33 


123.69 


Braces 


1,411.90 


25 


56.48 


Glasses 


450.08 


38 


11.84 


Surgical appliances 


166.15 


8 


20.77 


Repairs to appliances ; 


200.85 


13 


15.45 




8,359.10 


56 


149.27 


Convalescent Home Care 


483.99 


4 


121.00 


Physical and Occupational Therapy 


810.97 


17 


47.70 


Transportation 








Medical services 


393.36 


68 


5.78 


Maintenance 










353.69 


18 


19.65 


Training 








Educational institution 


33,969.09 


253 


134.27 


Employment 


4,029.50 


52 


77.49 


Correspondence 


362.84 


22 


16.49 


Tutorial 


3,147.24 


69 


45.61 


Training supplies and equipment 


10,858.37 


157 


69.16 


Maintenance 


33,162.78 


149 


222.57 


Transportation 


3,276.34 


196 


16.72 


Occupational Tools and Equipment 


1,436.63 


13 


110.51 . 


Occupational licenses 


25.00 


6 


4.17 


Miscellaneous 


339.54 


30 


11.32 



122 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid: Counties of Maryland and 
Baltimore City*: 1920-1948 




1920 '22 24 '2b '28 '30 '32. 34 '3b '3b '40 '42. '4i '4b '4.S '50 

Yea r=t_ 

* Includes expenditures from City funds for training teachers in City training school (s) but ex- 
cludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 95 



Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1948 



School Year 


Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


Debt 


Capital 




Total 


State 


Federalf 


Local 


Service 


Outlay 



total state: 



1923 


$12,764,250 


$3,058,180 


$46,966 


$9,659,104 


$789,311 


$4,776,355 


1928 


16,147,689 


3,207,088 


69,150 


12,871,451 


2,131,699 


3,430,589 


1933 


16,873,271 


3,604,406 


89,006 


13,179,859 


3,142,211 


1,956,656 


1938 


19,241,146 


5,160,297 


228,591 


13,852,258 


3,739,854 


2,335,564 


1939 


19,964,102 


5,250,038 


221,939 


14,492,125 


3,901,004 


2,876,322 


1940 


20,598,186 


5,368,777 


222,905 


15,006,504 


3,985,448 


2,786,810 


1941 


21,347,680 


5,344,511 


*224,673 


15,778,496 


3,964,528 


1,262,309 


1942 


21,988,929 


5,758,744 


*241,047 


15,989,138 


4,055,300 


1,721,378 


1943 


21,927,683 


5,752,513 


*252,903 


15,922,267 


3,776,207 


834,802 


1944 


25,177,130 


8,039,004 


*229,721 


16,908,405 


4,119,423 


432,259 


1945 


26,436,523 


7,582,813 


*289,901 


18,563,809 


4,063,754 


817,053 


1946 


29,232,564 


9,268,057 


266,876 


19,697,631 


4,192,979 


2,197,635 


1947 


34,579,206 


9,834,584 


267,308 


24,477,314 


3,878,466 


3,547,469 


1948 


48,991,023 


18,865,623 


356,249 


29,769,151 


4,506,683 


10,681,767 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



1923 


$5,964,456 


$2,005,335 


$33,710 


$3,925,411 


$103,691 


$1,475,269 


1928 


7,787,298 


2,207,335 


51,910 


5,528,053 


551,100 


1,532,718 


1933 


8,485,146 


2,531,668 


78,343 


5,875,135 


1,159,054 


688,497 


1938 


9,893,912 


4,219,147 


144,854 


5,529,911 


1,404,598 


1,576,434 


1939 


10,216,150 


4,300,033 


166,016 


5,750,101 


1,583,135 


2,845,537 


1940 


10,752,978 


4,415,744 


166,215 


6,171,019 


1,681,020 


2,773,778 


1941 


11,108,701 


4,406,610 


*167,417 


6,534,674 


1,673,385 


1,116,817 


1942 


11,687,272 


4,828,593 


*185,069 


6,673,610 


1,778,006 


1,483,259 


1943 


12,185,970 


4,830,993 


*188,549 


7,166,428 


1,670,780 


816,813 


1944 


14,164,717 


6,376,332 


*183,768 


7,604,617 


1,926,702 


423,538 


1945 


15,038,389 


6,240,694 


*214,274 


8,583,421 


1,853,258 


703,839 


1946 


17,176,530 


7,816,534 


189,548 


9,170,448 


1,843,094 


1,592,508 


1947 


21,257,594 


8,354,423 


205,947 


12,697,224 


1,920,211 


3,174,964 


1948 


29,578,429 


15,192,053 


273,381 


14,112,995 


2,199,309 


10,250,500 



BALTIMORE CITY* 



1923 


$6,799,794 


$1,052,845 


$13,256 


$5,733,693 


$685,620 


$3,301,086 


1928 


8,360,391 


999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,580,599 


1,897,871 


1933 


8,388,125 


1,072,738 


10,663 


7,304,724 


1,983,157 


1,268,159 


1938 


9,347,234 


941,150 


83,737 


8,322,347 


2,335,256 


759,130 


1939 


9,747,952 


950,005 


55,923 


8,742,024 


2,317,869 


30,785 


1940 


9,845,208 


953,033 


56,690 


8,835,485 


2,304,428 


13,032 


1941 


10,238,979 


937,901 


*57,256 


9,243,822 


2,291,143 


145,492 


1942 


10,301,657 


930,151 


*55,978 


9,315,528 


2,277,294 


238,119 


1943 


9,741,713 


921,520 


*64,354 


8,755,839 


2,105,427 


17,989 


1944 


11,012,413 


1,662,672 


*45,953 


9,303,788 


2,192,721 


8,721 




11,398,134 


1,342,119 


*75,627 


9,980,388 


2,210,496 


113,214 


1946 


12,056,034 


1,451,523 


77,328 


10,527,183 


2,349,885 


605,127 


1947 


13,321,612 


1,480,161 


61,361 


11,780,090 


1,958,255 


372,505 


1948 


19,412,594 


3,673,570 


82,868 


15,656,156 


2,307,374 


431,267 



* Excludes expenditures for vocational training of war production workers. 

t Expenditures by the Federal Government for salaries and operating expenses are included for all years 
for the Indian Head School in Charles County and beginning in 1945 for the Frank Knox School in St. 
Mary s County. 

t Includes expenditures from City funds for training of teachers in the City training school, but ex- 
cludes appropriations by City and State for the teachers' retirement system. 



124 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures for Public Schools in Maryland for the Year 

Ending June 30, 1948 



County- 
Total State 
Baltimore City 
Total Counties 

Charles 

St. Wary's 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Calvert 

Queen Anne's 

Howard 

Carroll 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Kent 

v/icomico 
Anne Arundel 
Prince George 1 s 
Washington 
Cecil 
Harford 
Montgomery 
Baltimore 



Received from 



m State, Excluding Equalization Fund 

] Equalization Fund 

fFy\ Federal Aid 

E=j County Levy and Other County Sources 





For basic data see TABLES 96 and XI— XIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 96 



Sources of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



1 — — 










Per 


Cent from 


Each 


Source 
















StatP 










Local 




Total 






T 


















Levy 




Current 






and Other 


















and 


C/OUNTY 


Funds 




Local Sources 






Equal- 






Fed- 


Other 












Total 


ization 


Other 


eral 


Local 
















Fund 










Sourc's 


T„4-_ 1 10 (C AH 

i otai j.y4o-4 i 


«Q/1 KAA Add. (\C\ 


MA KRA OH 


*9fi7 30ft on 


^94 AA9 fiOJ. on 


28 


5 


11 


5 


17 








8 


70.7 


orate i34i-4o 


AO QQ1 (\OQ nq 


J.O,OOO f D<-O.Oi7 




9Q 7fiQ 1 ^0 QQ 


38 


5 


17 


1 


21 


4 





7 


60 . 8 


Balto. City . . 


19,412,593.81 


°3,673,570.00 


82,868.15 


15,656,155.66 


18 


9 






18 


9 





4 


80.7 


Tot. Counties 


9Q ^78 A9Q 9R 


1 ^ 1 Q9 0^ 


973 ^an ^fi 


14,11^,^^0.00 


51 


4 


28 


3 


23 


1 





9 


47.7 


All 

Allegany . . . 


9 A Kf fi£7 QA 


1 a(\Q on 


90 fifiQ 1 9 


Qfi4 Q78 Q9 


59 


8 


37 


2 


22 


6 





8 


39 .4 


An. Arundel 


9 1 CQ 01 A AQ 


1 9^1 fiR9 fifl 


8 9^fi 

O, £00.0.7 


qns ^7^ c,n 


57 


7 


33 


9 


23 


8 





4 


41.9 


Baltimore . . 


4,141,784.12 


1,041,596.65 


19,353.60 


3,080,833.87 


25 


1 






25 


1 





5 


74.4 


Calvert 


425,613.30 


284,270.00 


3,443.60 


137,899.70 


66 


8 


45 


6 


21 


8 





8 


32.4 


Caroline . . . 




Q7C 1 no nn 


O lit CO 

-,110,0- 


1/1Q9Q1 7fi 
14o,iBl. 1 D 


72 


1 


48 


4 


23 


7 





4 


27.5 


Carroll 


1,050,669.22 


658,358.77 


3,106.00 


389,204.45 


62 


7 


39 





23 


7 





3 


37.0 


Cecil 


756,566.44 


347,535.28 


1,514.79 


407,516.37 


45 


9 


21 


5 


24 


4 





2 


53.9 


Charles .... 


627,280.23 


471,167.14 


t57.615.64 


98,497.45 


75 


1 


49 


7 


25 


4 


9 


2 


15.7 


Dorchester . 


725,206.83 


489,155.00 


5,545.68 


230,506.15 


67 


4 


44 


2 


23 


2 





8 


31.8 


Frederick . . 


1,315,595.40 


796,120.27 


6,201.92 


513,273.21 


60 


5 


35 


4 


25 


1 





5 


39.0 


Garrett .... 


708,951.56 


559,326.40 


8,043.07 


141,582.09 


78 


9 


54 


5 


24 


4 


1 


1 


20.0 


Harford .... 


1,131,830.16 


494,800.88 


10,299.48 


626,729.80 


43 


7 


19 


7 


24 








9 


55.4 


Howard .... 


600,688.82 


385,571.53 


5,425.80 


209,691.49 


64 


2 


40 


9 


23 


3 





9 


34.9 


Kent 


424,880.49 


252,982.26 


2,661.46 


169,236.77 


59 


6 


37 


4 


22 


2 





6 


39.8 


Montgome'y 


3,749,397.07 


1,193,184.96 


27,276.73 


2,528,935.38 


31 


8 


13 


9 


17 


9 





7 


67.5 


Pr. George's 
Qu. Anne's . 


3,320,616.60 


1,871,701.94 


10,398.02 


1,438,516.64 


56 


4 


32 


1 


24 


3 





3 


43.3 


451,517.70 


291,154.00 


3,219.14 


157,144.56 


64 


5 


41 


8 


22 


7 





7 


34.8 


St. Mary's . 


424,189.78 


301,813.00 


f42,800.17 


79,576.61 


71 


1 


47 


3 


23 


8 


10 


1 


18.8 


Somerset . . . 


518,334.48 


391,167.00 


2,803.12 


124,364.36 


75 


5 


50 


9 


24 


.6 





5 


24.0 


Talbot 


497,357.12 


306,153.16 


5,122.95 


186,081.01 


61 


6 


37 


2 


24 


4 


1 





37.4 


Washington 


2,174,203.89 


1,128,396.54 


22,554.98 


1,023,252.37 


51 


9 


30 


5 


21 


4 


1 





47.1 


Wicomico . . 


798,607.81 


469,479.20 


2,189.16 


326,939.45 


58 


8 


34 


1 


24 


.7 





3 


40.9 


Worcester. . 


595,170.45 


365,828.91 


2,764.12 


226,577.42 


61 


4 


38 


2 


23 


2 





5 


38.1 



* Accrued basis — Includes State and Federal Aid for 1947-48 received after June 30, 1948. 

t Includes expenditures by Federal Government for salaries and operating expenses as follows: Charles County, 
Indian Head School $51,535.26; St. Mary's County, Frank Knox School $39,571.37. 

t Excludes State, Federal, and county funds for school lunches and estimated expenditures for health services for 
public school pupils provided by health offices in the counties and City of Baltimore. 

° Excludes $1,087,861.00 paid to the Baltimore City Retirement System for teachers. 

For detailed data see TABLES XI-XIII. 



126 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 4 

How Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses Was Used in 1947-481n the 

Maryland Counties 



Including Transportation 




* Fixed charges and payments to adjoining counties. Auxiliary agencies include transportation, 
libraries, health and public payments for school lunch program. 



Maryland State Department of Education 127 
TABLE 97 



Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education 

Year Ending June 30, 1948 











Current 


Expenses 








County 


General 
Control 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 
Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies* 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


Capital 
Outlay^ 



Including Cost of Transportation 



Total State'. 


2 


9 


1 


9 


69 


2 


4 





7 


7 


4 


5 


9 


3 





5 


18 


1 


Baltimore City .... 


3 


1 


2 


1 


68 


8 


4 


2 


9 


4 


5 


5 


6 


8 


to 


1 


2 


2 


Total Counties 


2 


7 


1 


8 


69 


4 


3 


9 


6 


6 


3 


9 


11 








7 


26 





Allegany 


2 


6 


1 


8 


68 


5 


3 


1 


7 





3 





13 


5 





5 


2 


1 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3 


4 


1 


5 


68 


9 


4 


3 


6 


6 


4 





10 


6 





7 


39 


9 


Baltimore 


2 





1 


8 


71 


3 


5 


6 


6 


6 


4 


3 


8 


1 





3 


47 


9 


Calvert 


4 


7 


2 


3 


57 


6 


3 


4 


4 


6 


8 


4 


18 


5 





5 


37 


2 


Caroline 


3 





2 


1 


64 


8 


3 


6 


4 


8 


5 


9 


15 


2 





6 





1 


Carroll 


2 


5 


2 





69 


6 


4 





4 


9 


1 


9 


14 


3 





8 


14 


7 


Cecil 


2 


5 




8 


69 





3 


9 


7 


4 


4 


1 


10 


6 





7 


5 


2 


Charles 


2 


5 


1 


9 


65 


2 


3 


2 


8 


7 


3 


3 


14 


9 





3 


5 


6 


Dorchester 


2 


9 


1 


8 


66 


6 


2 


4 


7 





3 


6 


14 


9 





8 


8 


1 


Frederick 


2 




1 


8 


69 


4 


3 


6 


5 


6 


2 


g 


14 


I 


o 


g 


5 




Garrett 


3 


6 


1 





66 


2 


3 





3 


9 


2 


5 


18 


g 


I 


2 


2 


1 


Harford 


2 


4 


1 


7 


72 





4 


2 


5 





3 


8 


10 


2 





7 


11 


9 


Howard 


3 


3 


I 


7 


67 


9 


4 


2 


5 


9 


2 


7 


14 




o 


2 


4 


o 


Kent 


4 


2 


2 


8 


66 


3 


2 


9 


6 


1 


3 


6 


13 


5 





6 


7 


4 


Montgomery .... 


3 





1 


9 


69 


6 


4 


3 


9 


4 


2 


7 


8 


4 





7 


34 


5 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


2 


7 


1 


9 


72 


5 


3 


7 


7 





4 


8 


6 


1 


1 


3 


33 


3 


2 


8 


2 


7 


63 


8 


3 





5 


2 


6 





15 


8 





7 


5 


4 


St. Mary's 


3 


6 


2 


3 


62 


6 


3 


5 


7 


7 


4 


5 


15 


5 


o 


3 




o 


Somerset 


2 


4 


2 





65 


9 


3 





5 


5 


6 


1 


14 


5 





6 


4 


1 


Talbot 


2 


9 


2 


4 


67 





3 


5 


5 


5 


5 





12 


9 





8 


4 


4 


Washington 


2 


8 


1 


3 


73 


8 


3 





5 





4 


7 


8 


9 





5 


16 


2 


Wicomico 


2 


6 


1 


7 


67 


8 


3 


7 


6 


3 


4 


3 


12 


4 


1 


2 


18 


4 


"^^orcester 


2 


7 


I 


4 


65 


3 


2 


6 


6 





6 


A 
U 




D 


o 




g 


l 










Excluding Cost 


of Transportation 
















Total State 


3 





2 





72 


7 


4 


2 


8 


1 


4 


8 


4 


7 





5 


18 


8 


Baltimore City .... 


3 


1 


2 


1 


69 





4 


2 


9 


4 


5 


5 


6 


5 


to 


2 


2 


2 


Total Counties 


3 





1 


9 


75 


3 


4 


2 


7 


2 


4 


3 


3 


4 


o 


7 


27 


6 


Allegany 


2 


8 


1 


9 


72 


7 


3 


3 


7 


4 


3 


2 


8 


2 





5 


2 


2 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3 


7 


1 


6 


75 




4 


7 


7 


2 


4 


4 


2 


6 





7 


42 





Baltimore 


2 


1 


1 


9 


76 


1 


6 





7 





4 


6 


2 





o 


3 


49 


5 


Calvert 


5 


6 


2 


7 


69 


5 


4 


1 


5 


5 


10 


1 


1 


9 


o 


6 


41 


7 


Caroline 


3 


4 


2 


4 


74 


2 


4 


1 


5 


5 


6 


7 


3 








7 





1 


Carroll 


2 


8 


2 


3 


78 


6 


4 


5 


5 


5 


2 


1 


3 


3 





9 


16 


2 


Cecil 


2 


8 


2 





76 


5 


4 


3 


8 


2 


4 


5 





9 





8 


5 


7 


Charles 


2 


9 


2 


1 


74 


7 


3 


7 


10 





3 


8 


2 


5 





3 


6 


4 


Dorchester 


3 


3 


2 





76 





2 


8 


8 





4 


1 


2 


9 





9 


9 


1 


Frederick 


2 


3 


2 





78 


1 


4 


1 


6 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 





7 


5 


7 


Garrett 


4 


4 


1 


2 


80 


1 


3 


6 


4 


7 


3 





1 


6 




4 


2 


6 


Harford 


2 


5 


1 


9 


76 


7 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 




4 


4 





7 


12 


6 


Howard 


3 


7 


1 


9 


76 


9 


4 


8 


6 


7 


3 


1 


2 


7 





2 


4 


5 


Kent 


4 


8 


3 


.2 


74 


4 


3 


2 


6 


8 


4 





2 


9 





7 


8 


3 


Montgomery .... 


3 




2 





72 


9 


4 


5 


9 


8 


2 


8 


4 


1 





8 


35 


6 


Prince George's . . 


2 


9 


1 


9 


75 


4 


3 


9 


7 


2 


5 





2 


3 


1 


4 


34 


1 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


3 


3 


3 


1 


74 


5 


3 


6 


6 


1 


7 





1 


5 





9 


6 


3 


St. Mary's 


4 


.3 


2 


7 


74 





4 


1 


9 





5 


3 





3 





3 


1 


2 


Somerset 


2 


.7 


2 


3 


74 


3 


3 


4 


6 


2 


6 


8 


3 


7 





6 


4 


6 


Talbot 


3 


.2 


2 


7 


75 


4 


3 


9 


6 


1 


5 


6 


2 


2 





9 


4 


9 


Washington 


2 


.9 


1 


4 


77 




3 


1 


5 


3 


4 


9 


4 


8 





5 


16 


8 


Wicomico 


3 


.0 


1 


9 


75 


6 


4 


1 


7 





4 


9 


2 


2 


1 


3 


20 


1 


Worcester 


3 


.2 


1 


6 


76 


3 


3 





7 





7 





1 


4 





5 


7 


1 



* Excludes estimated expenditures for health services rendered public school pupils by county, City, and State 
health offices. 

t Excludes appropriations for the Baltimore City Retirement System for teachers. 

X Percentage obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of current expenses and capital outlay. 



128 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 98 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control: State of Maryland: 

1942, 1945, 1948 



County 



1942 


1945 


1948 


County 


1 QAO 


1 OA K 

iy4o 


1QJQ 

iy4o 


$2.38 


$2.67 


$4.75 


Garrett 


$3.03 


$3.68 


$5.68 








Harford 


1.63 


2.02 


3.73 


3.14 


3.32 


5.51 




2.28 


2.87 


5.23 








Kent 


3.56 


4.07 


8.10 


1.90 


2.27 


4.31 


Montgomery 


1.66 


2.80 


6.09 


1.48 


1.92 


4.46 


Prince George's 


1.47 


1.41 


4.15 


1.98 


2.53 


4.84 




3.51 


4.38 


5.35 


1.41 


1.41 


2.53 


St. Mary's 


4.02 


4.53 


6.29 


3.87 


3.88 


7.83 


Somerset 


2.40 


3.03 


3.70 


3.10 


3.88 


4.93 


Talbot 


3.12 


3.64 


4.70 


2.02 


2.35 


3.79 




1.30 


1.85 


4.67 


1.98 


2.46 


3.99 


Wicomico 


2.36 


3.10 


3.90 


1.99 


2.45 


3.80 


Worcester 


2.31 


2.31 


4.19 


2.24 


2.84 


4.72 










1.81 


1.94 


3.05 











State Average . . 

Baltimore City. 

County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 



For basic data see TABLES VI and XIV. 



TABLE 99 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses*: Counties of Maryland: 1923-1948 





All Schools 




Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Year 






















Totalt 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 . . 


$43.00 


$46.22 


$17.07 


$34.84 


$39.84 


$17.08 


$90.79 


$91.12 


$77.38 


1928. . 


52.62 


55.85 


24.25 


42.91 


47.81 


22.97 


93.51 


95.82 


52.13 


1933 . . 


51.89 


54.37 


25.95 


42.51 


46.82 


24.12 


79.32 


82.35 


44.34 


1938. . 


61.12 


63.20 


35.15 


50.70 


53.41 


30.10 


87.59 


90.87 


58.54 


1939 . . 


61.84 


63.43 


38.83 


51.04 


53.50 


32.91 


87.00 


89.94 


65.68 


1940. . 


64.81 


66.21 


42.11 


53.88 


56.07 


35.77 


88.48 


91.45 


64.32 


1941. . 


66.46 


67.74 


45.32 


55.29 


56.95 


38.69 


90.69 


93.49 


68.45 


1942 . . 


70.36 


70.86 


52.11 


58.73 


58.75 


43.40 


95.69 


97.86 


78.57 


1943 . . 


71.16 


72.48 


56.54 


60.39 


60.70 


48.34 


100.46 


102.57 


84.23 


1944° . 


81.77 


82.62 


66.04 


69.04 


71.16 


58.43 


116.06 


118.20 


100.45 


1945° . 


86.64 


86.62 


68.30 


72.37 


74.83 


60.23 


120.87 


123.04 


105.18 


1946*. 


98.28 


98.27 


76.97 


80.29 


83.15 


67.46 


124.73 


127.02 


107.44 


1947 . . 


114.54 


114.15 


91.43 


92.83 


95.84 


76.69 


145.20 


147.66 


134.92 


1948 . . 


157.30 


153.19 


122.59 


124.19 


128.27 


105.62 


194.71 


198.28 


169.78 



* Estimated expenditures made by county, City, and State health departments for health services are excluded, 
t General Control and Fixed Charges are included in the total for all schools but are excluded elsewhere in this 
table. 

t Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary and not high 
jchool pupils. 

° Includes State and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1948, see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



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130 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 101 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland White Elementary Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 







Instructional Service 












Total 


















County 


Current 




Salaries of 








Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 




Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 






visiont 


and 




















Teachers 














Total State 


$132.66 


$3.34 


$97.04 




$4.80 


$11.68 


$6.89 


$8.91 


$26.73 


ItimnfP (~*Ai"\T 


143.30 


4.89 


105.30 




6.07 


16.42 


9.37 


1.25 


4.01 


Total Counties 


128.27 


2.69 


93.63 




4.29 


9.71 


5.87 


12.08 


36.12 


Allegany 


133.08 


3.05 


101.19 




2.59 


10.38 


5.03 


10.84 


3.74 


Anne Arundel .... 


112.34 


2.91 


77.82 




4.07 


8.31 


7.02 


12.21 


48.97 


Baltimore 


107.21 


1.60 


79.17 




4.80 


7.76 


5.83 


8.05 


49.78 


Calvert 


197.22 


3.32 


109.15 




6.60 


13.79 


27.67 


36.69 


22.93 


Caroline 


128.49 


3.34 


89.39 




2.00 


6.88 


5.47 


21.41 


0.05 


Carroll 


114.18 


2.58 


82.19 




3.41 


7.16 


2.70 


16.14 


34.73 


Cecil 


123.95 


2.87 


88.22 




4.18 


8.74 


5.93 


14.01 


7.01 


Charles 


J145.74 


3.28 


J90.82 




t4.91 


J17.25 


J7.32 


22.16 


4.54 


Dorchester 


142.48 


2.57 


100.41 




2.06 


11.96 


5.20 


20.28 


23.97 


Frederick 


116.09 


2.24 


82.09 




3.51 


7.79 


3.44 


17.02 


9.06 


Garrett 


125.00 


2.14 


89.86 




2.78 


5.67 


2.84 


21.71 


2.04 


Harford 


120.07 


2.28 


90.87 




4.21 


7.35 


5.48 


9.88 


11.37 


Howard 


124.61 


2.63 


87.44 




4.33 


9.12 


4.14 


16.95 


1.18 


Kent 


163.43 


5.38 


113.30 




3.80 


14.15 


6.48 


20.32 


7.51 


Montgomery 


171.85 


4.52 


128.17 




7.20 


16.95 


5.29 


9.72 


137.94 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


126.00 


2.32 


96.49 




4.70 


10.69 


6.66 


5.14 


37.06 


154.55 


4.17 


100.55 




4.62 


9.43 


10.05 


25.73 


2.16 


St. Mary's 


J179.58 


4.83 


J109.73 




J6.74 


J20.14 


J8.83 


29.31 




Somerset 


134.79 


3.90 


90.64 




4.99 


8.44 


7.79 


19.03 


V.86 


Talbot 


145.23 


3.86 


97.15 




3.51 


10.55 


11.53 


18.63 


0.97 


Washington 


128.98 


2.62 


104.21 




3.19 


7.03 


4.98 


6.95 


5.12 


Wicomico 


122.19 


1.62 


84.64 




4.42 


9.50 


6.49 


15.52 


57.63 


Worcester 


143.35 


3.11 


92.53 




2.78 


10.38 


9.97 


24.58 


9.64 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, kindergartens, and estimated expenditures made by county, City, and 
State health departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

j Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head and Patuxent River are included. 

See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 102 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High and 
Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Instri 

Super- 
visionf 


JCTIONAL Si 

Salaries of 
Principals 

and 
Teachers 


IRVICE 

Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$210.49 


$3.51 


$160.45 


$10.25 


$16.69 


$9.04 


$10.55 


$61.55 




236.77 


4.12 


184.60 


10.70 


23.83 


10.71 


2.81 


0.92 


Total Counties 


198.28 


3.23 


149.22 


10.04 


13.38 


8.26 


14.15 


89.75 


Allegany 


183.35 


3.38 


140.19 


8.86 


14.27 


5.31 


11.34 


3.83 


Anne Arundel .... 


191.80 


1.17 


145.34 


9.64 


13.56 


6.10 


15.99 


279.85 


Baltimore 


162.89 


3.69 


122.07 


11.58 


10.48 


5.77 


9.30 


187.55 




243.13 


6.38 


143.57 


15.28 


7.59 


13.40 


56.91 


526.53 


Caroline 


228.18 


4.46 


152.27 


14.00 


13.01 


21.21 


23.23 


0.48 




190.16 


4.06 


145.80 


9.60 


7.95 


2.87 


19.88 


14.31 


Cecil 


198.62 


2.98 


147.88 


9.58 


15.97 


7.01 


15.20 


12.63 


Charles 


J243.95 


3.86 


U71.62 


J8.04 


J23.69 


J7.07 


29.67 


35.49 


Dorchester 


215.57 


3.82 


152.79 


8.84 


17.48 


10.10 


22.54 


15.42 


Frederick 


184.38 


3.07 


140.33 


8.66 


9.19 


6.18 


16.95 


8.08 




204.02 




145.31 


10.10 


7.52 


7.91 


33.18 


7.49 




203.06 


3.09 


159.18 


11.08 


9.79 


7.84 


12.08 


40.62 


Howard 


229.62 


2.89 


170.72 


12.98 


14.35 


5.36 


23.32 


12.37 


Kent 


240.33 


7.95 


179.51 


7.56 


12.77 


11.61 


20.93 


37.63 


Montgomery 


254.77 


3.61 


195.79 


14.34 


25.24 


6.90 


8.89 


99.83 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


190.92 


3.81 


147.92 


8.18 


12.12 


10.60 


8.29 


153.23 


241.34 


5.99 


164.06 


8.97 


15.29 


11.85 


35.18 


2.98 


St. Mary's 


210.46 


1.26 


131.24 


8.66 


16.88 


15.80 


36.62 


0.84 




227.40 


4.01 


161.07 


7.09 


13.14 


21.80 


20.29 


14.14 


Talbot 


209.15 


5.96 


151.20 


10.56 


10.87 


10.55 


20.01 


9.15 


Washington 


191.77 


1.61 


151.23 


7.67 


10.64 


12.63 


7.99 


41.37 


Wicomico 


202.13 


4.01 


148.57 


8.36 


12.73 


10.93 


17.53 


9.41 


Worcester 


219.73 




157.38 


7.63 


13.04 


15.14 


26.54 


9.01 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, and estimated expenditures made by county, City, and State health 
departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 

+ Federal expenditures for maintenance and operation and contributions toward other current expenses at Indian 
Head are included. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



132 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 103 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Colored Elementary Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 







Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




Salaries of 






Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 






vision! 


and 
















Teachers 












Total State 


$120.90 


$2.87 


$92.38 


$4.09 


$9.65 


$6.23 


$5.68 


$10.71 


Baltimore City 


134.53 


2.82 


104.37 


4.65 


12.70 


8.78 


1.21 


4.05 


Total Counties 


105.62 


2.92 


78.95 


3.46 


6.23 


3.38 


10.68 


18.17 


Allegany 


112.84 




95.10 


2.96 


8.82 


5.19 


0.77 




Anne Arundel .... 


107.77 


1.57 


87.13 


5.14 


6.92 


3.61 


3.40 


5.4i 


Baltimore 


89.25 


1.92 


65.91 


4.87 


6.44 


3.04 


7.07 


0.27 


Calvert 


88.78 


4.01 


69.31 


1.44 


2.83 


6.18 


5.01 


14.77 


Caroline 


101.16 


1.77 


73.69 


1.70 


3.48 


2.55 


17.97 




Carroll 


97.61 


1.42 


68.31 


4.75 


5.86 


3.64 


13.63 


0.13 


Cecil 


120.76 


3.05 


72.10 


2.85 


10.73 


7.40 


24.63 


1.47 


Charles 


87.08 


2.64 


63.96 


3.08 


4.41 


1.78 


11.21 


1.56 


Dorchester 


110.03 


3.65 


78.65 


1.85 


5.33 


3.14 


17.41 


0.85 


Frederick 


97.41 


3.49 


69.63 


2.72 


6.31 


1.36 


13.90 


0.26 


Garrett 


















Harford 


121.76 


4.49 


93.56 


4.89 


5.36 


5.25 


8.2i 


12.i8 


Howard 


99.17 


3.66 


72.58 


2.63 


3.33 


3.50 


13.47 


0.68 


Kent 


126.48 


4.98 


87.79 


4.26 


6.40 


4.21 


18.84 


5.60 


Montgomery 


152.92 


4.09 


106.27 


3.52 


14.93 


4.37 


19.74 


29.08 


Prince George's. . . 


104.69 


1.78 


84.07 


3.47 


7.18 


3.16 


5.03 


70.43 


Queen Anne's .... 


136.71 


5.05 


98.21 


4.44 


4.53 


4.05 


20.43 


0.20 


St. Mary's 


114.11 


7.07 


86.47 


1.99 


2.42 


1.03 


15.13 


10.29 


Somerset 


93.08 


2.81 


66.67 


1.52 


4.26 


4.10 


13.72 


Talbot 


110.57 


3.49 


80.79 


3.18 


5.10 


2.09 


15.92 


20.59 


Washington 


89.39 




71.53 


2.26 


5.14 


1.13 


9.33 


395.30 


Wicomico 


105.99 


4.i8 


77.05 


3.95 


5.23 


2.72 


12.86 


1.48 


Worcester 


93.08 


3.59 


64.88 


2.16 


4.19 


3.61 


14.65 


0.81 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges, and estimated expenditures made by county, City, and State health 
departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
For basic data, see TABLES VI and XX. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 104 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High and 
Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1948 







Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




Salaries of 






Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 






vision! 


and 


















Teachers 












Total State 


$178.63 


$2.22 


$134.43 


$7.79 


$14.82 


$7.07 


$12.30 


$91.20 


.Baltimore City 


i fin 
186.72 


2.30 


146.41 


7.69 


19.76 


8.00 


2.56 


16.90 


Total Counties 


169.78 


2.13 


121.31 


7.90 


9.43 


6.06 


.22.95 


172.50 


Allegany 


285.22 




223.00 


16.09 


24.35 


16.29 


5.49 




Anne Arundel .... 


176.03 


V.io 


121.48 


11.80 


10.00 


4.11 


27.54 


20.64 


Baltimore 


161.09 


4.78 


119.53 


10.02 


8.72 


7.25 


10.79 


1,401.51 


Calvert 


185.88 




101.47 


6.36 


9.93 


6.93 


61.19 


7.99 


Caroline 


177.61 


3.99 


124.46 


10.67 


5.65 


9.35 


23.49 


0.16 


Carroll 


225.53 


3.21 


158.01 


12.74 


7.42 


5.71 


38.44 


10.54 


Cecil 


202.51 


1.46 


129.51 


9.63 


17.76 


9.99 


34.16 


9.00 


Charles 


168.84 




125.23 


4.89 


12.67 


5.35 


20.70 


1.83 


Dorchester 


156.36 


i'.is 


114.12 


3.49 


8.21 


4.07 


25.29 


1.83 


Frederick 


160.67 


3.56 


122.44 


6.18 


6.85 


1.38 


20.26 


0.50 


Garrett 


















Harford 


152.i4 


2.40 


119.27 


8.25 


6.6i 


'6.16 


10.05 


32.48 


Howard 


147.38 




101.72 


8.24 


5.21 


4.35 


27.86 


43.96 


Kent 


175.04 




125.60 


7.65 


8.83 


3.04 


29.92 


10.84 


Montgomery 


208.39 


3.93 


143.40 


10.99 


14.26 


6.01 


29.80 


167.61 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


156.11 


5.46 


111.53 


6.82 


9.01 


5.14 


18.15 


68.98 


215.64 


6.02 


135.03 


4.70 


6.89 


32.57 


30.43 


104.91 


St. Mary's 


182.20 




127.50 


8.41 


9.52 


5.57 


31.20 


16.68 


Somerset 


146.17 




109.18 


6.05 


10.36 


3.76 


16.82 


0.18 


Talbot 


153.89 




119.91 


6.94 


6.21 


3.33 


17.50 


0.35 


Washington 


225.84 




189.41 


4.23 


10.62 


1.65 


19.93 


881.70 


Wicomico 


170.31 




128.31 


8.14 


8.06 


3.47 


22.33 


11.50 


Worcester . . . 


125.83 




86.33 


3.25 


8.16 


7.00 


21.09 


30.61 



* Excludes General Control, Fixed Charges and estimated expenditures made by county. City, and State health 
departments for services rendered public school children, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXI. 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 





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Calvert 

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Kent 

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Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



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136 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 107 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland: 1947-48 



Purpose 


1948 
Allotment 


1948 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1948 


Total 


$316,144.44 

89,399.00 
124,609.05 
66,005.11 
13,901.97 
22,229.31 


$310,549.33 

89,364.47 
120,324.84 
66,005.11 
13,887.85 
20,967.06 


$5,595.11 

34.53 
4,284.21 




Trade and Industry 


Teacher Training and Supervision 

Distributive Education 


14.12 
1,262.25 



TABLE 108 



Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 1947-48 





All 

Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 
Education 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 




$310,549.33 

112,371.39 
31,256.35 
30,553.43 
4,351.00 

46,629.64 
14,640.47 
15,726.04 
5,872.00 

2,290.66 
8,027.47 
13,887.85 

24,943.03 


$92,948.67 

55,703.23 
19,907.52 
5,688.00 
1,412.00 


$126,570.38 

25,548.89 
458.34 
17,016.58 


$70,063.22 

29,439.27 
10,890.49 
7,848.85 
2,939.00 


$20,967.06 
1,680.00 


Instruction in Counties 

Day Schools — White 


Colored 


Evening Schools — White 








Instruction in Baltimore City 

Day Schools 


46,629.64 
5,574.92 
3,778.25 
3,276.98 

2,290.66 
8,027.47 
6,245.54 

7,723.11 


1,237.56 
11,947.79 
2,595.02 


Evening Schools 




7,828.05 












Instruction by the University of Md. 




Volunteer Firemen 








3,584.20 
6,653.72 


4,058.11 
7,059.45 




State Supervision and Guidance 


3,506.75 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



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138 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 111 



Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Baltimore City Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 









Enrollment 
























Federal 




Expenditures 














Aid per 


Purpose 


of Federal 




White 


Colored 




Pupil 




Funds 














Enrolled 




Total 


















Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 




Total 


$82,868.15 


7,007 


2,838 


1,151 


765 




782 


$11.83 


Trade and Industrial 


55,982.81 


3,514 


2,459 


270 


664 




45 


15.93 


Day Schools 


46,629.64 


1,886 


1,193 


270 


378 




45 


24.72 


Evening Schools 


5,574.92 


1,552 


1,266 




286 






3.59 


Part-Time 


3,778.25 


*76 












49.71 


Home Economics, Evening 


















Schools 


7,828.05 


1,189 




533 


11 




645 


6.58 


Distributive 


13,185.29 


2,304 


379 


348 


90 




92 


5.72 


Evening 


1,237.50 


680 


324 


174 


90 




92 


1.82 


Part-Time 


3,848.25 


*1,395 












2.76 


Cooperative Part-Time .... 


8,099.54 


229 


55 


i74 








35.37 


Supervisiont 


5,872.00 














1.01 



* Distribution by color and sex not available. 

t Federal funds were not used for the supervision of home economics education. 



TABLE 112 



Enpenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training in Vocational 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Purpose 


Total 
Expenditures 


State Administration 
and Supervision 


Teacher 
Training 


State and 
University 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


University 
of Mary- 
land Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Total 

Agriculture 

Trade and Industry 

Home Economics. . . . 

Distributive Education 

Occupational Information and 
Guidance 


$46,323.92 

12,639.55 
15,090.02 
11,688.70 
3,048.50 

3,857.15 


$38,830.88 

9,156.93 
12,887.67 
10,036.58 

2,892.55 

3,857.15 


$25,863.39 

5,753.77 
6,933.83 
6,270.14 
3,048.50 

3,857.15 


$24,943.03 

5,572.73 
6,642.13 
5,978.47 
2,892.55 

3,857.15 


$20,460.53 

6,885.78 
8,156.19 
5,418.56 


$13,887.85 

3,584.20 
6,245.54 
4,058.11 



140 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 113 

Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties 1947-48 



County 


Expenditures fob Salaries 


Per Cent of 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds* 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 




$101,065.76 


$34,904.33 


$35,818.44 


$30,342.99 


34.5 


35.5 


30.0 


$16,912.74 


$9,287.64 





WHITE 





85,477.24 


30,878.33 


30,053.94 


24,544.97 


36 


1 


35 


2 


28 


7 


14,899.13 


Allegany 


17,192.50 


9,761.83 


6,934.50 


496.17 


56 


8 


40 


3 


2 


9 


1,870.41 


Anne Arundel 


4,158.00 


684.00 




3,474.00 


16 


5 






83 


5 


1,608.90 


Baltimore 


18,174.53 


7,370.00 


6,606.50 


4,198.03 


40 


6 


36 


3 


23 


1 


1,377.01 


Calvert 


2,010.00 






2,010.00 










100 





323.92 


Caroline 


2,530.00 






2,530.00 










100 





1,326.73 


Carroll 


1,949.64 


512.00 


661.00 


776.64 


26 


3 


33 


9 


39 


8 


Cecil 










Charles 
























Dorchester 


867.00 


171.00 


696.00 




i6 


7 


80 


3 






57.45 


Frederick 


4,717.25 


165.00 


206.50 


4,345.75 


3 


5 


4 


4 


92 


i 


1,859.49 


Garrett 


620.00 


620.00 






100 















Harford 


7,884.20 


2,036.50 


5,308.50 


539.20 


25 


8 


67 


3 


6 


9 


762.68 


Howard 


245.50 


128.00 


117.50 




52 


1 


47 


9 






11.20 


Kent 


821.50 


203.50 


330.00 


288.00 


24 


8 


40 


2 


35 


6 


60.00 


Montgomery 


13,160.18 


5,399.00 


5,085.50 


2,675.68 


41 





38 


7 


20 


3 


1,191.66 


Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


5,203.44 


511.50 


2,617.44 


2,074.50 


9 


8 


50 


3 


39 


9 


2,335.87 
























St. Mary's 
























Somerset 


247.50 


55.00 


137.50 


' 55.66 


22 


2 


55 


6 


22 


2 




Talbot 


1,670.00 


624.00 


535.50 


510.50 


37 


3 


32 


1 


30 


6 


638.60 


Washington 


3,480.00 


2,637.00 


622.50 


220.50 


75 


8 


17 


9 


6 


3 


65.08 


Wicomico 


132.50 




132.50 








100 









1,217.66 


Worcester 


413.50 




62.50 


351.66 






15 


1 


84 


9 


192.47 















COLORED 



All Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



15,588.52 

148.50 
2,222.00 
2,938.00 

627.44 


4,026.00 


5,764.50 

148.50 
1,956.00 
1,401.00 




1,537.00 












132.00 
264.00 
1,048.50 
62.50 




132.00 




951.00 


97.50 
62.50 




2,095.83 
326.50 
258.50 
60.00 

2,520.75 


410.00 
132.00 
60.50 


245.00 
194.50 
198.00 
60.00 














247.50 
1,284.00 
62.50 
870.00 
420.00 


82.50 
132.00 


110.00 
528.00 
62.50 
424.00 
145.00 


446.00 
275.00 



5,798.02 

266.66 
627.44 

264.66 



1,440.83 



2,520.75 



55.00 
624.00 



25 


8 


37 





37 


2 






100 













88 





12 




52 


3 


47 


7 














100 








100 


6 














100 




90 


7 


9 


3 










100 









i6 


6 


ii 


7 


68 




40 


4 


59 


6 






23 


4 


76 


6 










100 

















100 




33 


3 


44 


5 


22 


2 


10 


3 


41 


1 


48 


6 






100 









5i 


3 


48 


7 






65 


5 


34 


5 







2,013.61 



16.01 
425.57 
115.54 



202.74 



1,130.25 



3.50 
120.00 



837.58 



87.00 



* Adult education account only. Does not include State reimbursement of supervisors' salaries. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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142 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 115— Maryland Pupils Transported to School in 1947-48 at Public Expense 



County 


Pupils Transported 


Public Expense for Transportation 


l otal 


Hiie- 
mentary 


High 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total State 


95,197 


58,100 


37,097 


$2,312,587.05 


$1,420,969.50 


$891,617.55 


Baltimore City 


OUl 


501 




AO O A A OC 

4<J,c$44.^5 


43,344.25 




Total Counties 


QA CQfi 

y4,oyo 


57,599 


OT HOT 

6 1 ,uy / 


Z,Zb9,Z42.oU 


1,377,625.25 


891,617.55 


Allegany 


5,917 


3,380 


2,537 


155,334.02 


90,737.86 


64,596.16 


Anne Arundel 


*7,940 


*4,630 


3,310 


*1 »70 1 AO t H 

*17i£,103.17 


*95,445.03 


76,658.14 


Baltimore 


1 Q Q 1 Q 

io,y iy 


9,011 


4,908 




156,694.98 


°63,839.30 


Calvert 


1,581 


954 


627 


67,977.06 


32,234.48 


35,742.58 


Caroline 


2,071 


1,271 


800 


65,764.30 


40,676.59 


25,087.71 


Carroll 


4,686 


2,977 


1,709 


111,042.85 


64,249.53 


46,793.32 


Cecil 


2,730 


1,576 


1,154 


rr a A A C AO 

74,445.03 


44,347.55 


30,097.48 


Charles 


2,979 


1,973 


1,006 


79,735.17 


48,801.00 


30,934.17 


Dorchester 


2,115 


1,284 


831 


88,047.99 


54,004.83 


34,043.16 


Frederick 


t5,141 


3,215 


fl 926 


fl49,796.81 


95,408.17 




Garrett 


J2.725 


J1.774 


J951 


J109.370.84 


J7l' f 979!79 


J37,391.05 


Harford 


3,934 


2,355 


1,579 


68,593.41 


41,156.04 


27,437.37 




2,895 


1,763 


1,132 


67,875.86 


39,513.06 


28,362.80 


Kent 


1,464 


879 


585 


45,998.96 


27,155.28 


18,843.68 


Montgomery 


8,959 


5,866 


3,093 


167,034.01 


107,762.34 


59,271.67 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


*8,752 


*4,686 


4,066 


*127,749.05 


*67,257.82 


60,491.23 


1,693 


978 


715 


65,682.28 


37,906.62 


27,775.66 


St. Mary's 


1,712 


895 


817 


64,405.04 


36,733.55 


27,671.49 


Somerset 


2,017 


1,248 


769 


58,570.00 


36,753.89 


21,816.11 


Talbot 


1,838 


1,116 


722 


54,490.05 


34,093.54 


20,396.51 


Washington 


f4,833 


2,694 


f2,139 


f90,155.74 


49,736.83 


t40,418.91 


Wicomico 


2,421 


1,613 


808 


83,065.89 


56,106.10 


26,959.79 


Worcester 


2,371 


1,461 


913 


81,470.99 


48,870.37 


32,600.62 



TABLE 116 



Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation Per Maryland County Pupil 
Transported: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Average Expenditure 


County 


Average Expenditure 
















All 


White 


Colored 




All 


White 


Colored 




Pupils 


Pupils 


Pupils 




Pupils 


Pupils 


Pupils 


All Counties. . . 


$23.96 


$23.38 


$27.12 


Garrett 


t$40.14 


|$44.63 








Harford 


17.44 


17.94 


$14.47 


Allegany .... 


26.25 


26.29 


16.82 


Howard 


23.45 


23.14 


24.72 


Anne Arundel 


*21.67 


20.01 


*34.04 


Kent 


31.42 


31.43 


31.40 


Baltimore. . . 


°15.84 


°15.17 


°25.71 


Montgomery . . 


18.64 


16.28 


32.30 


Calvert 


43.00 


47.18 


34.90 


Prince George's 


*14.60 


13.84 


*17.51 


Caroline .... 


31.75 


33.48 


26.88 


Queen Anne's . 


38.80 


38.45 


39.94 


Carroll 


23.70 


23.32 


31.00 


St. Mary's .... 


37.62 


40.70 


30.91 


Cecil 


27.27 


25.31 


42.91 


Somerset 


29.04 


33.99 


22.43 


Charles 


26.77 


31.88 


19.69 


Talbot 


29.65 


34.60 


22.31 


Dorchester . 


41.63 


44.25 


36.53 


Washington . . . 


U8.65 


fl8.06 


73.03 


Frederick . . . 


t29.14 


t28.87 


32.43 


Wicomico 


34.31 


35.49 


31.39 






Worcester 


34.32 


40.32 


24.68 



* Number transported includes 106 pupils, 32 from Anne Arundel and 74 from Prince George's, trans- 
ported to the Bowie State Teachers College, but these are excluded from public expense for transportation 
and average expenditure. 

t Data for 31 white high school pupils transported at a cost of $975.00, from Washington to Frederick 
have been transferred from the former to the latter county. 

t Data for 87 white elementary pupils, cost $5,861.00, and 88 white high school pupils, cost $4,563.99, 
transported from Garrett to Allegany have been transferred from the former to the latter county. Also, 
there is excluded from Garrett County $1 807.72 for the transportation of 5 white elementary and 29 
white high school pupils to the State of West Virginia. 

° Excludes payments by parents for the transportation of pupils in Baltimore County as follows: white 
high school pupils $22,306.60; colored high school pupils $1,719.10. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



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144 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 118 — Number of Maryland Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided 
at Public Expense, and Number of Buses Used, Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 


Number of Different Schools 


Number of Vehicles 


Total 


Schools 


for White 


Pupils 




Buses Owned by 


sr nvate 
Cars 

otation 

\X7q (TAng 
TV aguua 


With 
Ele- 
mentary 
Grades 
Only 


With 
High and 

Ele- 
mentary 
Grades 


With 
mgn 

Srhnnl 


Schools 

for 
Colored 
Pupils 


f^niin t v 


Con- 
tractors 


Total State 


*637 


276 


123 


56 


*182 


176 


t951 


J90 


.Baltimore Uity . . . 


6 


4 






2 




13 




Total Counties . . . 


*631 


272 


123 


56 


♦180 


176 


t938 


J90 


Allegany 


33 


20 


7 


4 


2 




t81 


9 


Anne Arundel . . 


*39 


19 


6 


5 


*9 




67 


3 


Baltimore 


56 


8 


28 


8 


12 


29 


T84 


2 


Calvert 


12 


5 




1 


6 




24 


4 




13 


4 


5 




4 




37 




Carroll 


19 


7 


9 




3 


3 


50 


3 


Cecil 


19 


7 


7 


i 


4 




35 


3 


Charles 


20 


1 


5 




14 


2 


34 


5 


Dorchester .... 


33 


14 


5 


2 


12 




46 


2 


Frederick 


34 


19 


6 


2 


7 


2 


77 


1 


Garrett 


30 


25 


4 


1 






44 


J23 


Harford 


26 


9 


6 


2 


'J 


it 


25 


2 


Howard 


17 


7 


3 


1 






27 




Kent 


15 


5 


4 




6 




25 




Montgomery. . . 


53 


27 


5 


h 


14 


75 


34 




Prince George's 


*54 


20 


5 


9 


*20 


28 




Queen Anne's. . 


23 


11 




3 


9 




27 


ii 


St. Mary's 


24 


13 




2 


9 




24 


10 


Somerset 


18 


5 


2 


2 


9 




36 




Talbot 


19 


7 


1 


2 


9 


2 


26 


2 


Washington .... 


36 


26 


6 


3 


1 


13 


46 


2 


Wicomico 


19 


7 


5 


1 


6 




45 




Worcester 


19 


6 


4 




9 




44 


2 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there, 
t Includes common carrier lines: 64 in total counties, 21 in Allegany, and 43 in Baltimore, 
j Includes one county-owned station wagon. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



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146 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 120 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as of 

June 30, 1948 







1948 Assessed 


Assessed "Valua- 


Per Cent School 




School Bonds 


Valuation Tax- 


tion per Dollar of 


Bonded Indebted- 




Outstanding 


able at Full Rate 


School Bonded 


ness is of As- 


County 


June 30, 1948 


for County 


Indebtedness 


sessed Valuation 












Total State 


$56,421,112 


t$2,573,217,154 


$46 


2.2 


Baltimore City 


*17,054,692 


■(•1,240, 687,929 


73 


1.4 


Total Counties 


39,366,420 


11,332,529,225 


34 


2.9 


Allegany 


2,422,000 


86,993,172 


36 


2.8 


Anne Arundel 


*4,288,386 


t79,059,401 


18 


5.4 


Baltimore 


8,021,667 


1-286,302,155 


36 


2.8 


Calvert 


715,000 


7,887,291 


11 


9.1 


Caroline 


78,000 


15,858,447 


203 


0.5 


Carroll 




43,034,761 






Cecil 


165,000 


t34,281,178 


208 


6.5 


Charles 


874,000 


114,312,385 


164 


6.1 


Dorchester 


301,060 


23,545,000 


78 


1.3 


Frederick 


622,000 


59,308,681 


95 


1.0 


Garrett 




16,440,567 






Harford 


4,112,500 


t47,693,632 


12 


8 '.6 




228,200 


20,586,930 


90 


1.1 


Kent 


1,000,000 


17,235,340 


17 


5.8 


Montgomery 


7,908,548 


t220,683,164 


28 


3.6 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


*6,541,559 


tl36,300,091 


21 


4.8 


120,000 


19,942,294 


166 


0.6 


St. Mary's 




13,660,452 






Somerset 


39,500 


13,586,753 


344 


0.3 


Talbot 


87,000 


25,195,832 


290 


0.3 


Washington 


669,000 


84,521,215 


126 


8 


Wicomico 


1,094,000 


38,540,485 


35 


2.8 


Worcester 


79,000 


27,559,999 


349 


3 



* Sinking fund balances have been deducted as follows: Baltimore City, $1,986,153.76; Anne Arundel, 
$131,614.33; and Prince George's, $249,440.97. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority property, for which see TABLE 128. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 121 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indeibtedness and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belongng: 1947-48 



County 



State Average . . 

Baltimore City . 

County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 

Calvert , 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick. . . . 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



$193.03 

159.58 

212.31 

163.36 
294.47 
262.09 
298.79 
24.64 



34.43 
212.76 
69.94 
68.43 



Interest 
Payments 



$4.20 

4.68 

3.92 

5.53 
4.60 
5.09 
5.09 
0.97 



1.08 
0.78 
2.43 
2.95 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



$568.88 


$0.36 


63.02 


2.21 


450.86 


4.53 


426.61 


10.44 


298.41 


4.26 


49.60 


0.99 




0.09 


11.78 


0.30 


28.73 


1.37 


52.54 


2.04 


201.73 


2.84 


21.44 


1.14 



TABLE 122 



Value of Maryland School Property 1923-1948 





Value of School Property* 


Value Per Pupil Enrolled 


Year 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


Cityt 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


t31.702.972 


277 


410 


184 


1939 


82,477,467 


49,676,141 


t32.801.326 


278 


408 


188 


1940 


86,373,506 


49,768,110 


t36.605.396 


291 


412 


208 


1941 


87,253,746 


49,827,220 


t37.426.526 


292 


414 


210 


1942 


88,171,154 


49,728,358 


t38.442.796 


296 


421 


213 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


t39.490.295 


300 


430 


217 


1944 


89,951,808 


50,127,722 


t39.824.086 


304 


427 


223 


1945 


89,660,481 


49,726,430 


t39.934.051 


303 


437 


219 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


T45.209.163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


t47.079.154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


t53.822.176 


338 


437 


278 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under cor* 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



148 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 123 



Value of Maryland School Property per Pupil Belonging : June 30, 1948 



County 


All Schools 


Schools for White 
Pupils 


Schools for Colored 
Pupils 


Total 
Value* 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value* 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value* 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total State 


$104,461,410 


$357 


$93,159,866 


$409 


$11,301,544 


$175 


Baltimore City .... 


50,639,234 


474 


42,727,989 


595 


7,911,245 


225 


Total Counties .... 


53,822,176 


290 


50,431,877 


324 


3,390,299 


111 


Allegany 


5,529,095 


373 


5,442,502 


373 


86,593 


356 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3,225,400 


221 


2,896,600 


267 


328,800 


89 


Baltimore 


t9, 501,335 


310 


t9,055,422 


331 


t445,913 


137 


Calvert 


253,686 


106 


190,956 


169 


62,730 


50 


Caroline 


721,825 


228 


648,050 


310 


73,775 


95 


Carroll 


1,426,308 


221 


1,404,308 


230 


22,000 


61 


Cecil 


1,278,590 


267 


1,217,350 


281 


61,240 


132 


Charles 


31,056,150 


257 


J627,060 


282 


429,090 


228 


Dorchester 


1,327,801 


309 


1,204,288 


409 


123,513 


91 


Frederick 


2,064,405 


227 


1,951,485 


237 


112,920 


134 


Garrett 


590,200 


131 


590,200 


131 






Harford 


tl, 164,350 


161 


tl,099,000 


177 


65,350 


63 


Howard 


817,600 


226 


779,700 


275 


37,900 


48 


Kent 


442,250 


199 


392,750 


257 


49,500 


71 


Montgomery .... 


9,225,900 


498 


8,936,550 


540 


289,350 


145 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


5,652,900 


258 


5,053,100 


282 


599,800 


149 


633,700 


262 


555,000 


316 


78,700 


118 




J314.405 


129 


t285,880 


182 


28,525 


33 


Somerset 


588,550 


175 


507,000 


252 


81,550 


61 


Talbot 


569,813 


188 


520,479 


258 


49,334 


49 


Washington 


4,576,375 


359 


4,533,375 


364 


43,000 


150 


Wicomico 


2,224,888 


410 


1,996,972 


502 


227,916 


157 


Worcester 


636,650 


173 


543,850 


232 


92,800 


69 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t Value of school buildings owned by the Federal Government has been included as follows: for 
white pupils, $637,828; for colored pupils, $138,005. 

t Value of school properties owned by the Federal Government have been excluded. 

° Value of equipment has been excluded from Baltimore City but included in the counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 124 

Tax Levy and Appropriations: State of Maryland: 1948-49 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityf . , 

Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundelf . 
Baltimoret 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carrollt 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchesterf. . . 
Frederickf 

Garrettt 

Harfordt 

Howardf 

Kentf 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne'sf . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington! • 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total Levy 
for 

All Purposes 



$105,400,558 

70,823,482 

34,577,076 

°2,399,801 
°2,471,298 
°8,445,058 
234,152 
301,372 

899,165 
774,364 
404,143 
553,632 
1,382,117 

°567,495 
°1,354,025 
506,033 
399,475 
5,786,621 

3,702,244 
345,554 
201,358 
310,732 
357,078 

1,727,927 
872,368 
581,064 



Appropriation for Public Schools 



Total for 
Schools 



$37,102,810 

17,943,639 

19,159,171 

1,291,799 
1,383,458 
3,489,723 
152,278 
160,286 

507,547 
544,024 
207,990 
278,943 
848,917 

198,741 
845,496 
207,118 
235,765 
3,510,336 

2,389,646 
188,079 
132,939 
149,094 
229,414 

1,400,668 

488,533 
318,377 



Current 
Expenses 



$30,780,758 

15,952,800 

14,827,958 

xl,029,765 
1,135,804 
x2,875,112 
75,479 
140,030 

425,898 
445,961 
128,863 
227,712 
x564,656 

xl61,418 
638,514 
168,928 
181,840 

2,878,402 

1,614,504 
162,283 
114,641 
129,506 
197,565 

942,233 
370,842 
218,002 



Debt 
Service 



$4,872,952 

1,966,839 

2,906,113 

262,034 
216,754 
520,111 
72,400 
9,835 



19,463 
63,412 
51,231 
109,261 



46,982 
30,147 
48,675 
631,934 

567,372 
14,160 



9,003 
17,200 

110,542 
83,414 
22,183 



Capital 
Outlay 



$1,449,100 
24,000 
1,425,100 



30,900 
94,500 
4,399 
10,421 

81,649 
78,600 
15,715 



175,000 

37,323 
160,000 
8,043 
5,250 



207,770 
11,636 
18,298 
10,585 
14,649 

347,893 
34,277 
78,192 



Appropria- 
tion for 
Libraries 



$1,419,848 
61,180,832 
239,016 



17,600 
72,500 



11,370 

' 1,400 
2,500 

6,488 
16,602' 
4,925 

a35,721 

30,314 
3,900 



900 
5,000 



20,000; 

9,796 



t Calendar year 1948. 

° State funds excluded: Allegany, $20,000 for care of insane and $200,000 lateral roads gasoline tax; Anne Arundel, 
$140,000 lateral roads gasoline tax; Baltimore, $300,000 lateral roads gasoline tax; Garrett, State Hospital Fund 
$7,250 and State Forestry Department $3,000; Harford, $200,000 lateral roads gasoline tax. 

x Includes expenditures of local funds for retirement of teachers as follows: Allegany $9,826.05; Baltimore $3,232.92; 
Frederick $4,800.00; and Garrett $2,400.00. 

b Includes $154,400 debt service. 

a Local levies in Bethesda and Silver Spring. 



150 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



os 

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Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



CHART 5 



Per Cent of Total Tax Levied by Counties and Incorporated Towns in Maryland 
Devoted to School Purposes: 1948-49 (*1948) 



County- 
Total State 
Baltimore City- 
Total Counties 

St. Mary's 
Cecil 

Washington 
Talbot 

Queen Anne 1 s 

Harford 

Kent 

Carroll 

Anne Arundel 

Caroline 

Prince George's 

Kontg ornery 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

Howard 

Frederick 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Charles 

Calvert 

Worcester 

Allegany 

Garrett 



Total 

33.0 

25.3 

1*6.2 

63.3 
6U-8 
68.7 
50.2 
1*9.3 
56.1 

5U.3 
5o.o 
1x9.6 
1*1*.2 
53.9 
1*2.7 
39.6 
1*1.3 
1*0.9 
1*9.0 
39.1 
1*1.6 
50.? 
60.5 
1*1 .B 
31.2 
31.1 



Current 
Expenses 



□ 



Debt Service and 
Capital Outlay 




27.3 




25.3 





* Calendar year 1948. 



152 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



TABLE 127 



Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1947-48 





Total Basis Assessable at 






County 


Full Rate for County 


Number of 


Wealth 




Purposes (in thousands) 


Pupils Belonging 


per Pupil 


State Total and Average 


$3,341,831 


292,288 


$11,433 




1,612,870 


106,874 


15,091 


County Total and Average . . . 


1,728,961 


185,414 


9,325 


Allegany 


125,825 


14,826 


8,487 




92,825 


14,563 


6,374 




393,999 


30,606 


12,873 


Calvert 


8,728 


2,393 


3,647 


Caroline 


18,983 


3,165 


5,998 


Carroll 


56,763 


6,461 


8,785 


Cecil 


56,952 


4,792 


11,885 


Charles 


17,330 


4,108 


4,219 


Dorchester 


30,582 


4,304 


7,105 


Frederick 


82,228 


9,090 


9,046 


Garrett 


23,382 


4,499 


5,197 


Harford 


82,377 


7,229 


11,395 


Howard 


24,848 


3,621 


6,862 


Kent 


19,893 


2,218 


8,969 


Montgomery 


245,005 


18,538 


13,216 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


166,536 


21,921 


7,597 


21,707 


2,419 


8,973 


St. Mary's 


14,658 


2,438 


6,012 


Somerset 


16,730 


3,353 


4,989 


Talbot 


28,862 


3,028 


9,532 


Washington 


116,227 


12,734 


9,127 




51,667 


5,423 


9,527 




32,854 


3,685 


8,916 



154 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 129 



Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates 1948-49 



County 


Calculated Tax Rates* 


Published 
Tax 
Rates 


Additional 
Rates in 
Districts 

and 
Incorp. 
Places 


Total 


Public 

Current 
Expenses 


Schools 

Debt 
Service 


Capital 
Outlay 


Public 
Libraries 


Total State 


$1 . 114 


$ . 924 


$ . 146 


$ . 044 


$.048 






Baltimore Cityt 


1.138 


1.012 


.125 


.001 


.076 


$2.85 




Total Counties 


1.093 


.846 


.166 


.081 


.017 








1.047 


.835 


.212 






1.67 


$.45-1.15 


Anne Arundelf 


1.442 


1.184 


.226 


!632 


"6i9 


zl.26 


.24-4.16 




.886 


.730 


.132 


.024 


.019 


1 R7 

i . O / 


_ AQ 

e . uo 


Calvert 


1.659 


.822 


.789 


.048 




2.15 


.75-1.50 


Caroline 


.769 


.672 


.047 


.050 




1.25 


.25-1.15 


Carrollf 


.876 


.735 




.141 




1.33K 


.50-1.00 


Cecil 


.938 


.769 


.033 


.136 


.020 


1.28 


.40-1.33 


Charles 


tt.no 


.688 


.338 


.084 




1.35 


.50- .80 


Dorchesterf 


.916 


.748 


.168 




!6o5 


1.75 


.65-1.35 


Frederickt 


1.039 


.691 


.134 


'.2U 


.003 


1.34 


.20-1.30 


Garrettt 


.842 


.684 




.158 


.029 


2.00 


.50- .85 


Harfordf 


.993 


.750 


!655 


.188 


.020 


1.47 


.85-1.00 


Howard? 


.788 


.643 


.115 


.030 


.020 


zl.70 


a. 04 


Kentf 


1.149 


.886 


.237 


.026 




1.60 


.45-1.35 




1.408 


1.155 


.253 




!6is 


sl. 88 


.18-1.86 


Prince George's 


1.392 


.941 


.330 


.121 


.018 


zl.97 


.25-3.07 


Queen Anne'sf 


.808 


.697 


.061 


.050 


.018 


1.20 


.25-61.25 


St. Mary's 


J. 808 


.697 




.111 




1.25 


.90 


Somerset 


.847 


.736 


!05i 


.060 


.005 


1.40 


.75-1.50 


Talbot 


.783 


.674 


.059 


.050 


.018 


1.50 


.85-1.30 


Washingtonf 


1.219 


.820 


.096 


.303 


.018 


1.50 


.37- .90 


Wicomico 


.947 


.719 


.162 


.066 


.020 


1.25 


.30-1.15 


Worcester 


.953 


.653 


.066 


.234 




1.35 


.25-1.40 



* Obtained by dividing appropriations by the total assessed valuation as follows: for assessments made by coun- 
ties, the fiscal years ending 12-31-48 and 6-30-49 respectively; for assessments made by the State Tax Commission, 
the fiscal year ending 12-31-47; the valuations of classes A and D motor vehicles have been added for school tax rates 
but excluded for public libraries. 

t Calendar year fiscal period. 

J Funds received from the U. S. Navy for schools at Indian Head and Patuxent River have been excluded. 

° Exclude State property tax. 

i Excludes rates for special service levies. 

e Ad valorem tax. 

a Special levy for police. 

b Estimated from 73-cent levy made for a seven-months' poerid 



156 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 6 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and 
Baltimore City: 1947-48 



County 



County Average 
Vontgomery 
Baltimore 
Talbot 

Queen Anne' s 

Washington 

Prince George* s 

Harford 

Anne Arundel 

Howard 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Worcester 

Kent 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calvert 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 

Baltimore City 

State Average 




Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, Fiscal Year 1948, page 94; popula- 
tion estimates from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



CHART 7 

Per Capita Income Payments in Thirteen States, 1947-48 

Per capita income payments (in hundreds of dollars) 

2 ^ 6 ^ 10 | 12 ^ ljj ^ 16 ^ 18 



1 New York 

2 Illinois 

3 Montana 
U Delaware 

5 Connecticut 

6 District of Columbia 

7 Nevada 

8 California 

9 New Jersey 

10 South Dakota 

11 Rhode Island 

12 Ohio 

13 Maryland 






Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1949. 



158 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



CHART 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland, 1929-1948 




i - 



o 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 p 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 

• 29 '31 '33 '35 '37 '39 '10. 'U3 'US 'U7 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, August 1949. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 130 

Receipts and Expenditures from Sources Other than Public Funds for Maryland 

Public Schools: 1947-48 



County 



Total Counties. . , 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Gross 
Receipts 



$847,903.27 



84,898.41 
202,359.07 



102,802.78 



73,677.77 
57,487.46 

326,677.78 



Net 
Receipts 



$2,397,046.64 


$2,299,502.83 


409,007.90 
127,892.10 
280,884.65 
8,719.98 
22,792.18 


409,007.90 
127,892.10 
280,884.65 
8,719.98 
14,768.22 


89,422.73 
12,669.06 
13,902.54 
32,866.06 
150,086.96 


65,516.72 
12,669.06 
13,902.54 
19,254.55 
150,086.96 


10,572.18 
90,048.17 
41,958.93 
19,939.34 
482,554.37 


10,572.18 
90,048.17 
41,958.93 
19,939.34 
485,452.72 


234,738.13 
12,071.76 
225.30 
29,518.57 
22,556.10 


234,738.13 
12,071.76 
225.30 
18,937.79 
16,555.03 


216,112.11 
53,091.29 
35,416.23 


177,793.28 
53,091.29 
35,416.23 



Expenditures 

from 
Net Receipts 



Balance, 
June 30, 1948 



$161,681.27 



8,023.96 
23,906.01 



13,611.51 



37,283.26 



10,580.78 
6,001.07 

62,274.68 



160 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 131 

Parent-Teacher Associations in Maryland County White and Colored Schools: 

1947 and 1948 



County 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


1947 


1948 


Total and County Average . 


439 


455 


78 


3 


80 


8 


237 


245 


87 


5 


91 


4 


Allegany 


30 


34 


76 


9 


87 


2 





1 








50 





Anne Arundel 


32 


33 


100 





100 





34 


33 


97 


1 


100 





Baltimore 


43 


44 


93 


5 


93 


6 


16 


16 


100 





100 





Calvert 


6 


7 


85 


7 


100 





12 


15 


70 


6 


88 


2 


Caroline 


8 


8 


88 


9 


88 


9 


2 


2 


50 





50 





Carroll 


16 


16 


80 





88 


9 


2 


4 


50 





100 





Cecil 


16 


13 


76 


2 


61 


9 


5 


3 


100 





75 





Charles 


9 


9 


100 





100 





19 


21 


95 





100 


.0 


Dorchester 


13 


15 


48 


1 


55 


6 


5 


10 


41 


7 


83 


.3 


Frederick 


17 


18 


54 


8 


58 


1 


4 


3 


50 





37 


5 


Garrett 


20 


26 


41 


7 


55 


3 














Harford 


23 


23 


76 


7 


76 


7 


8 


8 


72 


7 


80 


.6 


Howard 


9 


8 


81 


8 


72 


7 


7 


4 


87 


5 


50 


.0 


Kent 


11 


12 


91 


7 


100 





6 


6 


100 





100 


.0 


Montgomery 


41 


44 


97 


6 


97 


8 


20 


20 


100 





100 


.0 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


46 


47 


88 


5 


88 


7 


37 


37 


100 





100 


.0 


11 


9 


68 


8 


56 


3 


13 


13 


100 





100 


.0 


St. Mary's 


6 


6 


40 





40 





12 


13 


85 


7 


92 


.9 


Somerset 


13 


12 


100 





100 





8 


9 


88 


9 


100 


.0 


Talbot 


11 


11 


100 





100 





7 


7 


77 


8 


77 


.8 


Washington 


37 


38 


84 


1 


86 


3 


1 


1 


100 





100 


.0 


Wicomico 


12 


12 


75 





75 





10 


10 


90 


9 


90 


.9 


Worcester 


9 


10 


90 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100 


.0 



The parent (s) of the following number and per cent of county pupils visited the schools during 1947-48: 

Pupils Whose Parent (s) Visited School 
School Number Per Cent 

White Elementary 63,482 60 

Colored Elementary 10,939 49 

White High 15,022 26 

Colored High 2,389 29 

Teachers visited the homes of the following number and per cent of county pupils during 1947-48: 

Pupils Whose Homes Were Visited by Teachers 
School Number Per Cent 

White Elementary 14,693 14 

Colored Elementary 10,355 46 

White High 4,112 7 

Colored High 2,303 28 



Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 132 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1942-48 





Applicants 




Year Ending 






Number of 


June 30, 


Non-High School 


High School 


Certificates Issued 


Graduates* 


Graduatest 




1942 


64 




6 


1943 


70 




14 


1944 


55 




9 


1945 


72 




26 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


J1.525 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges. 

X Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



162 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



rS 



00 

3 

S3 



a-3 

fcO 



Ho 



§2 
fcO 



i 3 
HO 



3 

O 

feO | 



0) 

o «- 

feO 



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.c 2 

HO 



o 

feO 



HO 



oot--<*oeooc©-<#a>aa 



3 rt 
o u 
feO 









Frost- 
burg 


Four-Ye£ 
Graduatt 


CHOOOHTfMOt-W 




ear 
ites 




Total White 
Graduates 


i -3 
3 e« 
O i- 
feO 


HHHHNINHH 


Three-Yr. 
Graduates 





Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



-fi c 
rt o 



it 
° s 
*6 



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o 3 



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o3 o 



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00 <D O5C0<£> -iH <N 



is 



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=3 C o3 03 o3 



b 2 



a n, a> o oj 
03 O.C O £ 030300° 



c , 

ml 



£3* 

C'p 03 

£££ 



164 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 135 

Total Enrollment* at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 
Fall of 1938-1947 



Fall of 


Total White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 


1938 


1,013 


212 


239 


562 


177 


168 


1939 


1,067 


223 


273 


571 


131 


164 


1940 


953 


221 


221 


511 


150 


156 


1941 


823 


195 


209 


419 


155 


161 


1942 


638 


145 


159 


334 


120 


154 


1943 


537 


96 


154 


287 


109 


130 


1944 


440 


83 


120 


237 


110 


134 


1945 


580 


150 


163 


267 


121 


122 


1946 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


129 


125 


1947 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


152 


159 



* Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special 
students; see also TABLES 136, 137, and 138. 



TABLE 136 



Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1947 



Class 


Total 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 




White 










TEACHER TRAINING 


Total 


708 


118 


126 


464 


147 


159 


Freshman 


276 


43 


34 


199 


52 


67 


Sophomore 


201 


35 


41 


125 


36 


35 


Junior 


130 


29 


21 


80 


31 


23 


Senior. . . > 


101 


11 


30 


60 


28 


34 






JUNIOR 


COLLEGE 








Total 


401 


99 


156 


146 


5 




Freshman 


230 


56 


102 


72 


1 




Sophomore 


171 


43 


54 


74 


4 




OTHER STUDENTS 


Extension or Evening .... 


69 


41 


28 








Elementary School 


522 


173 


109 


240 


'99 


574 



Maryland State Department of Education 



165 



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lay: 



166 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



TABLE 138 



Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges by County-Class: 

Fall of 1947 



Area 


Total 


White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Grand Total 


230 


171 


OD 


A Q 

4o 


1 (\0 


KA 


no 


V A 


1 
1 


A 


Out-of-State 


6 


7 


1 


4 


4 


2 


1 


1 






Baltimore City .... 


48 


53 






1 




47 


53 






i otai counties .... 


1 net 

1 ( D 


ill 


55 


39 


97 


52 


24 


20 


1 


4 


Allegany 


46 


37 


46 


37 














Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore 


1 
19 


1 
15 


i 






i 

18 


i 

15 




i 
1 


Calvert 


1 


1 








i 


1 




Caroline 


2 


2 






2 


2 








Carroll 




1 












1 






Cecil 


'8 


2 






*8 






1 






Charles 


















Dorchester 

Frederick 


io 

2 


'i 


2 




io 












Garrett 


3 


l 


3 


1 














Harford 


8 


l 


1 




6 




i 


i 






Howard 




l 












1 






Kent 


i 


2 






i 












Montgomery . . . 


l 












i 








Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 


2 
3 

io 

6 


2 
'5 






'3 
io 

6 


*5 


2 






1 


Talbot 


6 






6 








'i 


Washington .... 
Wicomico 


2 
39 


1 

22 


2 


1 


39 


22 










Worcester 


12 


4 






12 


4 





























Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 139 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1939 - 1948 







Current Expenses 


Average 


Annual Cost Per 
Student 


Year 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees 


To 
State 



Frostburo 



1939 


204 


82,025 


33,895 


48,130 


402 


al66 


236 


1940 


214 


80,919 


37,869 


43,050 


378 


al77 


201 


1941 


210 


82,220 


36,535 


45,685 


392 


al74 


218 


1942 


186 


83,889 


33,398 


50,491 


451 


al79 


272 


1943 


116 


69,071 


20,757 


48,314 


595 


al79 


416 


1944 


75 


*85,257 


13,536 


*71,721 


1,136 


al80 


956 


1945 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


*71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 



Salisbury 



1939 


228 


89,119 


41,787 


47,332 


391 


al83 


208 


1940 


268 


93,633 


48,746 


44,887 


350 


al82 


168 


1941 


211 


84,281 


40,444 


43,837 


400 


al92 


208 


1942 


194 


92,625 


37,588 


55,037 


478 


al94 


284 


1943 


143 


68,922 


23,185 


45,737 


482 


al62 


320 


1944 


114 


*87,428 


22,572 


*64,856 


767 


al98 


569 


1945 


103 


*93,031 


21,157 


*71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22,184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98,266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 



Towson 



1939 


531 


218,699 


81,737 


136,962 


412 


al54 


258 


1940 


535 


224,929 


88,414 


136,515 


420 


al65 


255 


1941 


482 


219,112 


82,597 


136,515 


455 


al71 


284 


1942 


403 


222,487 


74,468 


148,019 


553 


al85 


368 


1943 


292 


187,934 


53,264 


134,670 


644 


al83 


461 


1944 


234 


*208,906 


43,145 


*165,761 


892 


al84 


708 


1945 


222 


*211,981 


46,227 


*165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


6164 


525 



Bowie 



1939 


158 


62,910 


19,069 


43,841 


399 


cl21 


278 


1940 


121 


57,695 


17,098 


40,597 


477 


dl41 


336 


1941 


140 


60,295 


19,270 


41,025 


431 


dl38 


293 


1942 


144 


63,134 


19,359 


43,775 


439 


dl35 


304 


1943 


104 


56,693 


15,960 


40,733 


545 


dl53 


392 


1944 


103 


*72,307 


14,939 


♦57,368 


702 


rfl45 


557 


1945 


103 


*76,536 


15,099 


*61,437 


743 


dl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


el41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


125 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1.073 


/151 


922 



* Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, aid men boarders $128. 

6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Law3 of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

e Resident students paid $110. There is no tuition fee. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

/ Resident students paid $171. There is a) tjitio.i fee. 



168 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 142 

Maryland Teachers Retirement System: Members in Active Service and Their 
Contributions* During the Year Ending July 31, 1948 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1948 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1948 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Junior Colleges 

Hagerstown 

Montgomery 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Department 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Md. Training School for Colored Girls 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School 



$845,845.69 
$794,563.26 



74,585.09 
54,544.10 

108,389.44 
10,630.93 
14,165.93 
26,870.44 
20,287.76 
13,298.79 
18,546.23 
35,066.90 
16,354.06 
29,870.13 
14,356.17 
12,019.83 

106,568.68 
87,938.96 
12,472.05 
8,075.11 
14,654.25 
11,297.76 
62,945.30 
25,902.89 
15,722.46 

$51,282.43 

$3,912.40 

616.54 
3,295.86 

$21,781.97 

2,704.79 
5,326.92 
4,243.20 
9,507.06 

$14,337.17 

1,177.40 
12,790.37 
369.40 

$11,250.89 

3,796.71 
3,588.54 
685.50 
1,556.34 
1,623.80 



5,554 
5,281 

463 
329 
745 
77 
90 
207 
148 
107 
139 
238 
114 
213 
105 
81 
598 
588 
87 
60 
108 
82 
408 
179 
115 

273 

20 

4 
16 

114 

16 

25 
23 
50 

74 

9 
62 
3 

65 

25 
18 
4 
9 
9 



* To the Annuity Savings Fund. 



170 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLE 144 

Appropriations By Source for Maryland Libraries Open to the Public and Amount per 
Capita: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City .... 

Total Counties .... 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Appropriation for Public Libraries 



Total 



$1,322,464 

1,004,536 

317,928 

17,680 
21,278 
49,099 

"4ii 

13,364 

2,6i8 
11,502 

6,296 
19,947 

6,163 
882 
48,679 
54,783 

6,267 

2,930 
13,016 
39,160 
3,424 
1,029 



County 
Funds 



$152,459 



152,459 



14,200 
42,219 



10,970 

'900 
1,000 
4,188 
16,000 
4,595 
100 

31,987 
3,900 

900 
5,000 
15,000 
1,500 



City or 
District 
Funds 



$1,058,490 

972,675 

85,815 

16,000 
450 



25 



500 
3,025 



44,095 
8,370 



200 
2,500 
10,000 
150 
500 



State 
Funds 



$39,105 
*13,591 
25,514 

4,i03 
2,ii3 



1,758 
*3,156 
1,374 



T10.369 
1,158 



1,483 



Other 
Funds 



$72,410 
18,270 
54,140 

1,680 

2,525 
6,880 

411 

256 

6i8 
7,477 
350 
791 
194 
782 
4,584 
4,057 
1,209 

1,830 
4,033 
14,160 
1,774 
529 



Estimated 
Popula- 
tion July 
1947 



2,096,979 

947,000 

1,149,979 

94,423 
82,826 
197,636 
11,388 
17,930 
42,430 
28,332 
19,859 
28,994 
60,569 
23,495 
40,874 
18,533 
13,719 
119,602 
130,500 
14,462 
32,318 
20,736 
19,056 
73,040 
37,926 
21,331 



* Includes funds for one year and a half. 

t Includes funds for two years. Library existed from July, 1946, but librarian was not on duty until 
February, 1947. 



172 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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173 



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174 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 148 



Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health— August 1, 1947 — July 31, 1948 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time* 
given to 
service 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Ex- 
amined by 
Dentist 


Treated 


Fillings 
inserted 


Teeth 
extracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 


Total 
operations 


Total 


26 




32,751 


4,891 


14,741 


4,762 


1,810 


4,496 


25,809 








1 


Full 


4,213 


730 


790 


898 


407 


1,568 


3,663 


Anne Arundel 


3 


Part 


1,832 


143 


1,635 


678 


4 


761 


3,078 




14 


Part 


9,029 


1,305 


6,012 


1,116 


535 


997 


8,660 


Calvert 


2 


Part 


709 


69 


225 


97 


8 


44 


374 


Frederick 




Part 


378 


288 


737 


160 


39 


64 


1,000 


Howard 




Part 


517 


124 


115 


255 


35 





405 


Kent 




Part 


1,292 


102 


188 


91 





50 


329 






Full 


12,587 


719 


1,726 


388 


49 


703 


2,866 


Prince George's 




Part 


93 


74 


327 


102 


40 


115 


584 






Full 


2,101 


1,337 


2,986 


977 


693 


194 


4,850 



* The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 



Maryland State Department of Education 177 



LIST OF FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL TABLES, 1947-48 

Subject of Tables 

Financial Statements 178-180 

I Number of Schools 181 

II Total Public School Enrollment 182-183 

III Catholic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 184-185 

IV Non-Catholic, Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching 

Staff 186-188 

V Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 189 

VI Average Number of Public School Pupils Belonging 190 

VII Average Daily Attendance 191 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance 192 

IX Average Days in Session; Per Cent of Attendance 193 

X Number of Public School Teaching Positions 194-195 

XI A. Receipts from State of Maryland 196 

B. Receipts from Federal Government 197 

XII Receipts from All Sources 198 

XIII Disbursements for All Purposes 199 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 200 

XV Disbursements for Instruction and Operation 201 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance, Auxiliary Agencies, and Fixed 

Charges 202 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service and Capital Outlay 203 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Schools 204 

XIX Disbursements for White High Schools 205 

XX Disbursements for Colored Elementary Schools 206 

XXI Disbursements for Colored High Schools 207 

XXII Cost, Teachers, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates, and Courses 

in Individual High Schools 208-213 

XXIII A. Enrollment by Subject in Each County Junior-Senior, Sen- 

ior, and Regular High School 214-218 

B. Enrollment by Subject in Each County Junior High School . 219-220 

XXIV Statistics of Public Libraries in Maryland 221-222 



178 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



179 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Maryland State Department of Education and the State Teachers Colleges, For the 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1948 



Source or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Frostburg 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Salisbury- 
State Teach- 
ers College 


Bowie 
State Teach- 
ers College 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1946-47 

General Fund Appropriation 

Special Fund Appropriation 

By Budget Amendment 

Total Funds Available. . . . 


$ 3,493.36 
326,453.00 

28,026.88 
16,032.00 


$ 4,597.68 
309,421.00 
103,339.90 
40,894.11 
8,980.00 


$ 25,537.24 
161,788.00 
38,666.64 
20,804.28 
1,020.00 


$ 677.07 
129,756.00 
56,670.52 
20,753.60 
21,980.00 


$ 6,715.24 
146,315.00 
22,972.22 
18,008.23 
33,080.00 


$374,005.24 


$467,232.69 


$245,776.16 


$228,483.05 


$227,090.69 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special Pay- 
ments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power, and Water . 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing Other than Office 

Supplies 

All Other Contractual Services. . 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies . 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning, and Disin- 
fecting Supplies 

Refrige ration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Sup plies 

All Other SuppMe s 

Building Materia jj- 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Material 

Materials for Equipment 

Highway Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equip- 
ment 

Live Stock 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment .... 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Motor Vehicles 

Non-Structural Improvements . . 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges .' .' .' 

Cafeteria 

Veterans Clearing Account 

Prior Year Funds, Etc 

Refunds of Students' Fees 

Summer Session 

Total Disbursements .... 

Unexpended Balance Returned 
to State Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1948 



$258,164.95 
499.65 
1,601.94 
42.00 
25,127.17 
154.09 
9,647.03 



492.05 



5,587.66 



8,381.70 



3,140.84 



411.15 



6,797.52 



443.07 



,736.00 



609.50 
427.52 



976.68 



$326,240.52 



$ 38,559.94 



$ 9,204.78 



$283,686.55 
8,065.32 
742.04 
7,347.62 
508.89 
28.50 
2,690.17 

2,379.04 
370.11 
61,311.07 
345.15 
14,090.42 
1,703.81 
313.29 

1,808.97 
80.38 

5,358.52 

382.34 
967.39 
156.70 
434.30 

4,090.04 
212.98 

1,819.18 



803.74 



944.85 



55.00 

52.69 
4,935.53 

16,252.69 
31.62 
239.45 



1,340.34 
269.00 
6,283.48 
18,851.66 
4,597.27 
1,442.00 



$455,060.73 



$ 6,190.76 



$ 5,981.20 



$140,905.13 
3,212.73 
258.40 
2,455.12 
767.40 
61.06 
1,193.52 

1,811.45 
2,621.41 
12,455.78 



4,126.44 
599.67 
1,339.11 

331.91 



3,489.29 



197.80 
633.75 



1,673.37 
47.54 
849.86 



205.88 
1,365.19 



2,178.99 

3,760.93 
32.25 

' 743. i9 
199.00 

' 258.45 

8,1 50.72 
762.64 
25,310.85 
1,630.00 
7,337.98 



$230,966.81 



$ 3,286.54 



$ 11,522.81 



$125,731.00 
4,354.74 
208.44 
4,928.55 
700.23 
19.00 
1,219.61 

828.42 
1,350.42 
32,196.19 



4,714.86 
580.11 
716.92 

753.92 
14.98 

3,293.50 



760.66 



3,100.74 
73.38 
1,177.96 



3.65 
544.79 



859.10 



2,648.53 



3,667.18 
30.37 



1,600.00 



392.70 



10,273.47 
427.51 
3,699.00 



$210,869.93 



$ 2,613.12 



$ 15,000.00 



180 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges, Fiscal Year Ending 

June 30, 1948 



Source and Purpose 


Total 


Bowie 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Balance Brought Forward from 1947 

General Bond Issue of 1939 


$97,735.85 
1,143.31 

23,244.00 

82,000.00 
35,000.00 
106,000.00 




$97,735.85 






General Construction Loan of 1941 


$ 17.30 

23,244.00 

17,000.00 
35,000.00 . 


$ 1,1^6.01 




Receipts 

Board of Public Works-Fire Loss Account 
General Construction Loan of 1947 

Deferred Maintenance 






15,000.00 




$50,000.00 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 






Construction of Dormitory for Boys... 
Total Available 




75,000.00 


31,000.00 


$345,123.16 


$75,261.30 


$112,735.85 


$76,126.01 


$81,000.00 






Disbursements 

General Construction Loan of 1941 


$ 1,143.31 

53,341.03 
32,190.61 
55,857.02 
71,269.79 


*$ 17.30 




$ 1,126.01 




Additions to Dining Hall; Other Im- 
provements 


$53,341.03 




Deferred Maintenance 


5,017.00 
55,857.02 


9,749.76 




$17,423.85 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 






Construction of Dormitory for Boys 




71,269.79 




Total Disbursements 








$213,801.76 


$60,891.32 


$63,090.79 


$72,395.80 


$17,423.85 


Balance as of June 30, 1948 

General Bond Issue of 1939 


$44,394.82 




$44,394.82 
5,250.24 






General Construction Loan of 1947 

Deferred Maintenance 


49,809.39 
2,386.98 
34,730.21 


$11,983.00 
2,386.98 




$32,576.15 


Reconstruction of Dormitory 




Construction of Dormitory for Boys.... 
Balance Forwarded to 1949 .... 




$ 3,730.21 


31,000.00 


$131,321.40 


$14,369.98 


$49,645.06 


$ 3,730.21 


$63,576.15 



* Reverted to General Fund. 



Maryland State Department of Education 181 



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183 



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Grades 1-6 


I 


21,923 

15,045 
14,665 
475 

6,878 

84 
576 
1,254 
12 

i3i 
143 
316 
38 
147 

325 
210 
240 

1,444 
246 
315 
455 
389 
95 
56 
479 






I 


42,340 

28,996 
28,391 
784 

13,344 

158 
1,142 
2,411 
15 

'263 
288 
620 
83 

'630 
387 
467 

2,87 i 
479 
575 
858 
726 
177 
114 
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County 


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Baltimore City* 

Elementary and 
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Senior High 

Vocational 

Total Counties* 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



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184 



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331.9 


283.5 
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197 



TABLE XI-B — Receipts from the Federal Government for Public School Purposes in Mary- 
land: Year Ending June 30, 1948 



From Veterans Administration 



County 



Total 
Federal 
Funds 



Vocational 
Education 



School 
Lunch 
Program 



Institutional 
On-the-Farm 
Training 



On-the-job, 
Related 
Training 



Schools 



Other 



Total State .... 

Baltimore City . 

Total Counties . 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline .... 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Pr. George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset . . 
Talbot 



Washington 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester. . 



$1,547,581.19 

656,839.54 

890,741.65 

183,900.72 
41,296.89 
61,850.90 
5,910.21 
13,566.95 

25,324.01 
6,032.69 
67,468.97 
23,404.30 
34,179.11 

14,953.98 
46,535.90 
18,265.44 
10,858.32 
99,935.74 

62,252.37 
9,774.89 
43,081.12 
15,087.41 
12,500.67 

71,818.52 
15,231.99 
7,510.55 



$254,185.55 

♦62,123.66 

192,061.89 

♦21,690.79 
*10,028.10 
♦19,245.93 
3,707.11 
♦2,133.72 

♦3,043.92 
♦1,477.25 
♦6,272.88 
♦5,767.07 
♦6,337.73 

♦8,949.40 
♦11,814.65 
5,884.50 
♦2,757.30 
29,630.61 

♦10,555.91 
♦5,391.68 
♦3,509.75 
♦2,967.98 
♦5,303.53 

♦20,747.04 
♦2,367.30 
♦2,477.74 



$617,748.13 

♦169,924.58 

447,823.55 

♦102,065.85 
♦27,965.36 
♦38,236.70 
♦2,203.10 
♦7,685.56 

♦11,832.57 
♦2,540.48 
♦8,970.16 
♦10,152.54 
♦23,252.75 

♦2,211.59 
22,435.91 
♦8,938.58 
♦3,822.81 
♦59,099.35 

♦44,982.47 
♦2,978.43 



$75,107.55 



7,619.27 
♦5,424.48 

♦40,690.18 
♦9,682.60 
♦5,032.81 



75,107.55 

♦3,425.86 
3,303.43 
4,368.27 

♦3,747.67 

10,447.52 
♦2,014.96 
690.67 
6,073.53 
4,588.63 

3,792.99 
2,785.34 
3,442.36 
♦4,278.21 
205.78 

♦6,713.99 
♦1,404.78 

4, 500. i 6 
1,772.66 

4,966.46 
2,584.28 



$7,423.81 



7,423.81 



$481,509.52 
424,791.30 
56,718.22 
56,718.22 



$111,606.63 



111,606.63 



♦1,411.16 



5,414.84 
597.81 



'51,535.26 



t9.500.00 
tl i ,000.66 



'39,571.37 



♦ Includes payments applicable to preceding year received after June 30, 1947 and excludes those of the current 
year received after June 30, 1948. 

t $9,000.00 from the Federal Works Agency and $2,000.00 toward the education of pupils resident on a military 
post. 

% From the Federal Works Agency for planning school buildings. 

° For salary operation and maintenance expenses at the Indian Head School in Charles County and the Frank 
Knox School in St. Mary's County. 



198 



Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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Gwynn Park 

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Hyattsville 

Mt. Rainier 

Maryland Park . . . 

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Douglass (Co!.) . . 
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Sudlersville 

Centreville 

Stevensville 

Kennard (Col.) . . . 


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Bani.eker (Col.) . . . 
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Cordova. 

Moton (Col.). . . 

Washington 

Hagcrstown 

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Clear Spring 

Hancock 

Boonsboro. . . 

Smithsburg 

North St. (Col.) . . 



218 Eighty-Second Annual Report 



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High Point Jr 

Brooklyn Park Jr. . . . 

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Randallstown, Jr 

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23 Elem. Schools 
with Jr. 7th 

Carroll 

Charles Carroll Jr. . . . 

Cecil 

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Indian Head Jr 

Hughesville Jr 

Ponionkey Jr. (Col.) . . 

Dorchester 

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INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 208-213 
Accreditation and certification, 25-29 
Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 128-129 
Expenditure, 200 
Per cent for, 126-127 
Superintendents, 2, 4-5, 195, 200 
Adult education, 10-11, 116-118, 136, 139-140, 202 

Reimbursement schedule, 15 
Age grade distribution, 54-55 
Agriculture, 32 

Adult education, 116-117 
Enrollment, 67-69, 79 

Each high school, 214-220 
Failures and withdrawals, 89 
Federal aid, 136-139 
Schools offering, 90, 214-220 
State supervision, 2 
Teachers, 90 
Aid from State and /or Federal funds: 
Counties and Baltimore City, 12 
Distribution by type of fund 
1947-1948, 124-125, 178, 196-197 
1920-1948, 122 
1923-1948, 123 
State teachers colleges, 167-168, 178-179 
Vocational education, 136-139, 178, 197 
Vocational rehabilitation, 121,ll78 
Appropriations 
County 

1947- 1948, 124-125, 178, 196, 198 

1948- 1949, 149-150 
1920-1948, 122 
1923-1948, 123 

State 

1947-1948, 124-125, 178, 196 

Art 

Enrollment, high school, 67-69, 81 
Each high school, 214-220 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 
Assessable basis, 152-154 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 192 

Average daily, 191 

Each high school, 208-213 

Index of elementary school, 47 

Per cent of, 45-48, 193 

Summer school pupils, 118 

Teachers at summer school, 93 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 119 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 130-133 

Expenditures for, 202, 204-207 

Per cent of current expense'budget, 126-127 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 82 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 178, 196 



B — (Continued) 

Belonging, average number, 190 

Each high school, 208-213 

Per teacher, 108-109 
Birth rates, 43-44 

Board of Education, State, 2, 178-179 
Boards of Education, County, 4-5 
Bonds outstanding, school, 13-14, 146 

Payment of, 14 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 130, 132 
High, 131, 133 
Expenditures 
All schools, 201 
Elementary, 204, 206 
High, 205, 207 
Per cent of current expense budget,*126-127 
Boys and girls 

Age grade distribution, 54-55 
Enrollment 
By grade, 48 
Total 

Nonpublic school, 184-189 

Public school, 182-183 
Graduates, high school, 60-66, 208-213 
Budget (s) 

Local, county, and Baltimore City 

1947- 1948, 124-125, 199 

1948- 1949, 149-150 
1920-1948, 122 
1923-1948, 123 

State public school, 178 

State teachers colleges, 178-179 
Buildings, construction and improvement, 14 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 111, 113-115, 181 

Value of school per pupil, 147-148 
Business education 

Adult, 116-118 

Enrollment, 67, 69, 77, 80, 136-137, 139 

Each high school, 214-218 
Failures and withdrawals, 88 
Schools offering, 90, 214-218 
Teachers, 90 
By-laws: repeal, enactment, revision, 15-16 

c 

Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 203 
By type of school, 130-133, 145, 204-207 
By year, 1920-1948, 122 
1923-1948, 123 
Case load action, rehabilitation, 36-37 
Certificates held by county teachers, 94-98 
Certification and accreditation, 25-29 
Child care centers, day nurseries, 16 
Child study, 21 
Classes 

Evening school, 116-118, 202 

Size of, 108-109 

Special for handicapped, 57-59 



223 



224 



Index 



C— (Continued) 

Summer school, Baltimore City, 118 
Clerk3, county schools, 106, 195 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1947 entering, 62-66 

of 1948 entering State teachers colleges, 61, 

208-213 

Junior, 164, 166 

State teachers, 3, 162-168 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 1947-1948, 91-92 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Conferences, division of instruction, 23-24 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 112 

Transportation of pupils, 141-144 
Construction accounts, State teachers colleges, 180 
Core program 

Enrollment, 67-69 

Each high school, 214-220 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high school 
pupils, 130-133 

By type of school, 129 

General control, 128-129 

Individual high schools, 208-213 

State teachers colleges, 167 

Transported, 141, 142 
Costs (see Expenditures) 
County professional assistants, 15 
Courses in individual high schools, 208-213 
Crippled children, services for, 57, 59, 174 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 128-133 

Individual high schools, 208-213 

Expenditures 
All schools, 199 
By type of school, 204-207 

D 

Dates 

Days in session, 39, 193 

Opening and closing of schools, 39 
Day nurseries, child care centers, 16 
Debt service 

1947- 1948, 147, 203 

1948- 1949, 149-150 
Tax rate for, 155 

Dental program, 175 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 136-137, 139 
Diversified occupations, 216, 217 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 83 

Schools offering, 90 

Teachers, 90 

E 

Election of officers, State Board of Education, 16 
Elementary schools, supervision, 105, 195 
Employment of high school graduates, 61-66 



E— (Continued) 

English, high school 
Enrollment, 67-69, 71 

Each high school, 214-220 
Failures and withdrawals, 88-89 
Schools offering, 90, 214-220 
Teachers, 90 
Enrollment 

Adult, 116, 118 

Atypical children, 119 

Elementary, 38, 40-41, 48-50, 182-189 

Grade or year, 48-50 

High school 

Course, each school, 208-213 
Growth in, 134-135 
Subjects, 67-69, 71-81 

Each school, 214-220 
Year, 48-50, 70 

Each school, 208-213 
Increase in, 40-42 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 38, 41-42, 

184-189 

Public schools, 38, 40-42, 48-50, 182-183 

State teachers colleges, 164-166 

Subject, high school, 67-69, 71-81 
Each school, 214-220 

Summary, 38, 41-42 

Summer schools Baltimore City, 118 
Equalization fund, 124-125, 196 
Equivalence examinations, 161 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 116-118 

Expenditures, 136, 139-140, 202 
Expenditures, 199-207 

(See also general control, instruction, operation, 

maintenance, auxiliary agencies, fixed charges, 

payments to adjoining counties, current expenses, 

debt service, capital outlay) 

Elementary schools, 204, 206 

Evening school, 136, 139-140, 202 

Health, 173, 202 

High schools, 205, 207 

Libraries, 202 

Rehabilitation, 37 

Salaries 

All schools, 201 
Elementary, 204, 206 
High, 134-135, 205, 207 
Vocational, 136-140 

State teachers colleges, 167-168, 178-180 

Total, by major classifications, 178, 199 

Transportation, 141-142, 202 

Vocational, Federal, 136-140, 197 



F 

Failures (see Non-promotions) 
Federal aid 

Federal Works Agency, 197 
Vocational education, 136-140, 178, 197 
Administration and supervision, 139 
Salaries of teachers 

Baltimore City, 136, 139 



Index 



225 



F— (Continued) 

County, day, 136-138 
County, evening, 136, 140 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 167-168, 178-179 
Financial statements 

County schools, 196-207 

State public schools, 178 

State teachers colleges, 178-180 
First grade 

Non-promotions, 51 
Fixed charges, 202 
French 

Enrollment, 67, 69, 78 
Each high school, 214-218 

Failures and withdrawals, 88 

Schools offering, 90, 214-218 

Teachers, 90 

G 

General activities, rehabilitation, 36 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 128, 129 
Expenditures, 200 
Per cent for, 126-127 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 82 
Grade enrollment, 48-50, 70 
Graduates, 

High school, 60-66 

Entering teachers colleges, 61, 62-63, 65-66 
From each school, 208-213 
Occupations of, 61-66 
State Teachers colleges, 162-163 
Guidance, 90 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 57, 178 

Home instruction, 57, 182-183 

Hospital schools, 57, 182-183 

Institutions for, 57, 119 

Opportunities for education of, 57-59 

Receipts from State, 57, 178, 196 

Transportation, 57 
Health 

Activities of State and County Departments of, 
22-23, 173-175 

Expenditures 
All schools, 202 
By county health offices, 173 
Service program, 22-23 
Hearing, conservation of, 57, 59 
High school equivalence examinations, 161 
High schools 
Aid for, 196 

Disbursements, 205, 207 

Individual, 208-220 

Supervision, 10, 21-22, 105, 195 
Home economics, 32-33 

Adult, 116-118, 136, 140 

Enrollment, 67-69, 79 

Each high school 214-220 

Federal aid, 136-140 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 
Home instruction of pupils, 57, 182-183 



I 

Immunizations, 174 
Income payments, per capita, 157-158 
Income tax, per capita, 156 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 150 
Index of school attendance, 47 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Industrial education, 33 
Instruction 

Cost per pupil, 130-133 

Expenditures, 204-207 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 201 
State teachers colleges, 167-168 

Per cent of current expense budget, 124-125 
Instruction, division of, 19-24 

Child study, 21 

Conferences, 23-24 

High school supervision, 21-22 

School health program, 22-23 

Special education, 24 
Inventories, 168 

J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, etc., 107 
Junior colleges, 164, 166 

K 

Kindergartens, 48-50 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 
Late entrants, elementary, 47 
Latin (see French) 
Legislation, 13-14 
Length of session, 39, 193 
Letter of transmittal, 7 
Levies, county, 149-150 
Libraries 

Expenditures, 172, 201 

Public 30-31, 171, 221-222 

School, 170, 172 
Library extension, 3, 30-31, 170-172, 178, 221-222 
Lip reading classes, 59 
Lunch program, 33-34 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil for, 130-133 

Expenditures for, 202, 204-207 

Per cent of current expense budget, 126-127 
Materials of instruction and books (see Books 

and instructional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 67-69, 76-77 
Each high school, 214-220 

Failures and withdrawals, 88-89 

Schools offerings, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 174 

Teachers, 178 



226 Index 



M — (Continued 

Men teachers, 92, 194-195 

Mentally handicapped children, 57-59 

Music, high school 

Enrollment, 67-69, 81 

Each high school, 214-220 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 82 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, adult educa- 
tion) 
Non-promotions 
Elementary, 51-53 
First grade, 51 
Subject, high schools, 
Each subject, 88-89 
One or more subjects, 84-87 
Number belonging, 190 
Each high school, 208-213 
Per teacher, 108-109 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 119 
Having one teacher, 112 
Nonpublic, 38, 184-189 
Public, 38, 181 

Elementary, 111-112 
High, 113-115 
Nurses, public health, 173 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 61-66 
One-teacher schools 

Cost per pupil, 130-133 

Decrease in, 112 

Number belonging in, 112 
Per teacher, 108 

Number of, 112, 181 

Per cent of attendance in, 46 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 130-133 

Expenditures for, 201, 204-207 

Per cent of current expense budget, 126-127 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 82 
Over age pupils, 56 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 160 

Parochial and private schools, 41-42, 184-189 

Parochial schools, transportation, 13-14 

Part-payment of salaries, 196 

Payment of bonds, 14 

Payments to adjoining counties, 127 

Pensions, 169, 178 

Physical education and health, 22-23, 173-175, 202 
Physical education and recreation 

Appropriations for, 178 

Enrollment, high school, 67-69, 81 
Each high school, 214-220 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 



P— (Continued) 

Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 57-59 
Pledge of students at State teachers colleges, 15 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 3 
Professional and clerical staff, counties, 15 
Private and parochial schools, 41-42, 184-189 
Property, valuation of 

County and Baltimore City, 152-154 

School, 147-148 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 4-5 

Supervisors, 105, 195 
Salaries of, 200 
Pupils 

Atypical, 119 

Nonpublic, 38, 41-42, 184-189 

One-teacher schools, 112 

Over age, 56 

Per teacher, 108-109 

Public 

Enrollment, 38, 40-42, 182-183 
Number attending, 191 
Number belonging, 190 
Per cent of attendance, 45-46, 48, 193 
Transported, 141-142, 143 

R 

Receipts from 
All sources, 198 
Federal government, 197 

Evening schools, counties, 140 

Federal Works Agency, 145, 197 

Teachers' salaries, counties, 136-139 

Vocational education, 136-140 
State 

Distributed by type of fund, 122-123, 178, 196 
Total and per cent, 122-123 
Teachers colleges, 167-168, 178-179 
Rehabilitation program in sanatoria, 36 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 2-3, 36-37, 120-121, 

178-179 

Repair, utility men, janitors, etc., 107 
Repeal, enactment, revision of by-laws, 15 
Resignations, State Department of Education, 

16-18 

Resignations, teachers, 99-100 

Retarded children, classes for, 57-59 

Retirement of teachers, 13-14 

Retirement system for teachers, 3, 169, 178 

s 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 134-135 
Per cent of school budget, 126-127 
Superintendents, 200 
Supervisors, 201 

Pupil personnel, 201 
Teachers, 8-9 

Average per teacher, 109-110 

Cost per pupil, 130-133 



Index 



227 



S — (Continued) 

Total 

Elementary, 204, 206 
High, 134-135, 205, 207 
Vocational, 136-139 
School bonds, 13-14 
School building, 14 
School health program, 22-23 
School lunch program, 33-34 
School plant, 11-12 
Schools 

For atypical children, 119 
Number of, 38, 111-115, 181 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 67-69, 74-75 

Each high school, 214-220 
Failures and withdrawals, 88-89 
Schools offering, 90, 214-220 
Teachers, 90 
Session, length of, 39, 193 
Sex of teachers, 92, 194-195 
Sight conservation classes and tests, 59 
Size of 

Classes, 108-109 
Schools 

Each high school, 208-213 
Elementary, 111-112 
High, 113-115 
Teaching staff, 111-113, 115, 194-195 
Social studies 

Enrollment, 67-69, 72-73 

Each high school, 214-220 
Failures and withdrawals, 88-89 
Schools offering, 90, 214-220 
Teachers, 90 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 57-59, 178 
Special education, 24 
Special high school teachers, 90 
State 
Aid 

Counties, City of Baltimore, 12 
To health, 173 
To schools, 12 

1920-1948, 122 

1923-1948, 123 

Showing various school funds, 178, 196 
Board of Education, 2, 178 
Election of officers, 16 
Excerpts from minutes, 15-18 
Resignations, 16-18 
Department of Education, 2-3, 178-179 
Department of Health 
Expenditures, 173 
School activities, 173-175 
Income taxes, 156 
Public school budget, 178-179 
Superintendent's review of 1947-1948, 8-12 
Teachers colleges, 3, 61-63, 65-66, 162-168, 

178-180, 208-213 
Teachers retirement system, 3, 169, 178 
Statistical tables, 177-222 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping, 80 
Subjects studied in high school, 67-83 
Each high school, 214-220 



S — (Continued) 

Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 93 

Pupils, 118 
Superintendents, 2, 4-5, 195 
Superintendent's review of 1947-1948, 8-12 
Supervision, Supervisors 

Cost per pupil for, 130-133 

Cost, salaries and expenses, 199 
By type of school, 204-207 

High school, 21-22 

Names of, 2-3, 4-5 

Number of, 105, 195 

Per cent of current expense budget, 126-127 
Salaries of, 201, 204-207 
State, 2-3, 10 
Surplus property, 35 

T 

Taxable basis, 152-154 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 126-127 

Tax rates, county, 155 

Teacher(s) 

Academic, high school, 90 

Certification of, 25-27, 94-98 

Colleges, 3, 61-63, 65-66, 162-168, 178-180, 

208-213 

Growth in number, 134-135 
Number of, 194-195 

For each high school subject, 90 
In each high school, 208-213 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 119 
Nonpublic, 184-189 
Public, 194-195 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 118 

Of atypical children, 119 

Pupils per, 108-109 

Resignations, 99-100 

Retirement of, 13-14 

Salaries, 8-9 

Growth in high school, 134-135 

Sex of, 92, 194-195 

Special subjects, high school, 90 

Summary, elementary and high, public and non- 
public, 38 

Summer school attendance of, 93 

Training institutions, 162-168, 178-179 

Turnover of, 99-103 
Teachers retirement system 

Financial statement, 169, 178 

Staff, 3 

Teachers contributions to, 169 
Trades and industries (industrial arts) 

Adult, 116-118, 136, 140 

Enrollment, 67-69, 79 

Each high school, 214-220 

Federal aid, 136-140 

Schools offering, 90, 214-220 

Teachers, 90 
Training centers, State teachers colleges, 164-165 
Training program, veterans, 34-35 
Transportation of pupils, 141-144, 202 

Cost, total and per pupil, 141-142, 202 



228 



Index 



T — (Continued) 

Nonprofit schools, 13-14 

Parochial schools, 13-14 

Per cent of pupils transported, 143 
Tuition charges, State teachers colleges, 167-168 
Turnover in teaching staff, 99-104 

V 

Vacations, county assistants, 15 
Value of 

Assessable property, 152-154 

School property, 147-148 
Veterans training program, 34-35 
Vocational education, 2, 4-5, 32-35, 136-140, 

178, 197 

Agriculture, 32 

Enrollment, day schools, 67, 69, 79, 137-139, 

214-218 

Evening schools, 116-118, 140 
Federal aid, 136-140, 178, 197 
Home economics, 32-33 



V— (Continued) 

Industrial education, 33 

School lunch program, 33-34 

State aid, 178 

Surplus property, 35 

Veterans training program, 34-35 
Vocational guidance, 2, 90, 139 
Vocational rehabilitation, 2-3, 36-37, 120-121, 

178-179 

w 

War emergency certificates, 94-98 
Washington county free library, 14 
Wealth back of each pupil, 153 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 47 

High, 88-89 
Withdrawals of teachers, 99-100 

Y 

Year, length of school, 39, 193 



Date Due 



I 3 ^0 OSfcfclS 




DC MT (5